Motoport Air Mesh Kevlar Not Impressed

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by mdloops, Mar 17, 2007.

  1. TallRob

    TallRob Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,395
    Location:
    Agoura Hills ,Ca
    When i got got my air mesh pants. They were stiff, the armor was as flat as a pancake. The knee armor was too low and the butt area was too baggy. That was until I actually sat on the bike. Then EVERYTHING fit perfectly. The knee armor was in perfect postion and the butt area was no longer baggy. Now aftger a month of riding in the gear. The armor is now perfectly contoured to the curves of my body. Also the mesh is much more flexible and broken in. I get asked about the gear all of the time. Bikers ask what it costs and non bikers ask if im a fire fighter. :rofl
  2. GypsyWriter

    GypsyWriter Sarah

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,745
    Location:
    Visalia CA
    I've been trying to get ahold of MP but nobody returns my calls or emails. I live in Cali so would like to get fitted for a pair of air mesh pants but am unsure whether to get the jean or overpant. This probably won't be everyday wear for me but for longer dedicated jaunts I want something to wear that both fits well on the bike and when I'm walking around taking pictures etc. For those who have the pants which do you prefer, the jean or the overpant? I'd be getting the liner too for cold weather days, if that makes a difference. Also does anyone know their store hours? Would I need an appointment for a fitting or can I just show up?
  3. Bill 310

    Bill 310 Poser Emeritus

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2002
    Oddometer:
    3,289
    Location:
    Hopefully Upright
    I just had Wayne build me a suit to fit, becuase I was concerned about the Darien Armour and how it flops around and falls out of place. I had crashed in a Roadcrafter with good results but they leak and I live in Vancouver and I replaced it with the Darien which is great for touring but not as protective for crashing in - especially in the largest sizes where the armour speads out

    I have BMW Street gurad suit and it fits me OK but the motoport suit seems far better fit wise for both my bikes that have a sit up and beg riding position (KTM 990 and BMW K 1200GT)

    I first saw Wayne`s gear (the summer kevlar on a rider who crashed at a good clip on the haul road on his FJR and went for a bounce roll and slide).I was sold at that point. I am tall 6`4`with 38.5 inch arms so I had to pay a size premium and I am very pleased with the outfit I bought

    I found the fitting to be complicated and my wife who sews was on the phone with Wayne measuring me for an hour. The fit was perfect right out of the box and I told Wayne how I dress under my gear and he made allowances for that.

    His gear is not cheap but I feel it is worth the cost, time and effort. I live in BC but had I had the time I would have ridden in for a custom fitting.
  4. poonbean

    poonbean gottago

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Oddometer:
    44
    Location:
    Orinda, CA
    My Marathon and Air Mesh Pant arrived the other day, and the clothing is much more comfortable than my cycleport airmesh jacket and jeans - which are both rather snug. The Marathon and Air Mesh pant are designed to be looser and more comfy. They are. The jacket, unfortunately, was built with pockets that I did not ask for, so I'm shipping it back to be rebuilt and to have the waist taken in 2 inches or so (no charge) - the waist was built about the same diameter as my chest, but my waist is smaller than that. I'm also going to get the velcro suspenders added to the pant - then I'm ready to go!

    I will have air mesh jacket and jeans up for sale.
  5. RichardU

    RichardU Let's Ride

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2004
    Oddometer:
    904
    Location:
    Marietta, GA
    I prefer the jeans style, and they will make them any size you want. Just send them a current pair of pants and they will copy them. If you want looser jeans, send them a pair of looser jeans.
  6. Josh69

    Josh69 Uhhh

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2007
    Oddometer:
    594
    Location:
    Euroland
    OK, I'll preface this by saying I'm planning on buying Motoport gear.

    However - I am an engineer, I do stress analysis and impact analysis for a living and Wayne doesn't know what he is talking about when he describes his armor or criticises the European standards.

    I believe his armor works very well and I believe this is shown by the numbers of people who have crashed in his gear and walked away, but his technical statements are wrong. His gear works but not for the reasons he claims it works.

    From the Motoport website QUOTES IN ITALICS:
    http://www.motoport.com/quadarmor
    Transfer of energy is not the same as impact absorption. Instead of placing the armor on top of the steel plate, if another steel plate was used as armor instead, even less transfer of energy through the steel plate to the sensors below would occur.

    This is wrong. Steel is very stiff. If you want to transfer energy, using a lump of rigid steel to do it is a good way. A plate of steel would be very BAD at absorbing impact. It may have excellent abrasion resistance but it has very poor impact absorbing properties. This is a fundamental mistake in the above statement, which means Wayne does not really understand what is happening.

    Direct vertical drop is extremely rare when in a crash (talking about the Euro test standard where they drop a lump of metal on the armor).

    Irrelevant. The Euro test is designed to find out how much energy is absorbed. Dropping a lump of metal on the armor is the best way to do it.

    If sensors were also placed on the metal anvil along with full encapsulation around the outside edges of the armor, more impact would be measured. Even with more sensors the impact would not be measured the same as crashing a motorcycle.

    Wrong. The only thing that matters is the energy transferred. To use the motorcycle crash equivalent, the sensors in the Euro test measure the energy transferred to your body. Wayne's statement is equivalent to testing how much energy the pole you just hit feels by putting sensors on the pole. Who cares about the pole.

    Quad-Armor, the Best Impact Protection in the World

    This statement is guaranteed. It is possible for you to test it, here at Cycleport, or at your home. Take a piece of armor out of any other motorcycle apparel. Put your fist up against the armor and punch a concrete wall, metal pole or any sharp hard object. Now perform the same experiment with Quad-Armor. This is a primitive test but, in reality, it is better than the impact testing Satra performs. Cycleport performs this same test with customers at Cycleport’s store. Currently the highest rated EN-Certified Back Protector is called the T-Pro Force Field. Cycleport has this T-Pro here in the showroom. After customers punch a sharp aluminum door frame it is evident that the Quad-Armor outperforms the T-Pro considerably. Most customers comment that Cycleport’s Tri-Armor feels more protective than the T-Pro.

    Wrong. If you took a pillow and tried to punch out your wall, it would feel pretty soft. Is a pillow a good bit of armor? No. The forces in a bad bike crash are so large that the armor needs to be reasonably stiff - or not feel soft to the touch - to absorb the impact. The energy in a crash is much larger than someone trying to punch out their wall or a door frame. And anyway stastically, people do not crash into anything as small and sharp as a door frame. The smallest thing you are likely to hit is a pole, which is a lot wider than the edge of a door frame.

    So - Motoport gear appears to work but you cannot take any note of the technical claims on their website.

    Josh69
    MIEAust, CPEng
    15 years experience in stress analysis including designing impact frames.
  7. makinwaves

    makinwaves Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,888
    Location:
    Travelling in South America!
    Thanks for providing a more scientifically defensible response to claims I always knew were over the top and at times, outrageous. Empirical evidence suggests the materials work in terms of abrasion and seam burst strength, as well as impact absorption.

    It's unfortunate that the claims made by Wayne or his website serve an injustice to a product that works. Not to mention, an equal injustice to a very rigorous European process that has developed scientifically defensible protective standards.

    For the record, I own Motoport kevlar pants with quad armour and I love them. :dunno :thumb
  8. spaceharrier

    spaceharrier Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2008
    Oddometer:
    97
    Location:
    NorCal
    Wow. Nicely summarized and much better than I've seen in some of the pissing contests. I'm not currently using any Motoport gear but have in the past, and I was always a little troubled by the ways these threads played out; the gear seemed to work very well in crashes but the explanations given seemed wobbly.
  9. poonbean

    poonbean gottago

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Oddometer:
    44
    Location:
    Orinda, CA
    That is quite helpful - you bring some clarity to Wayne's world. I'm just on my second set of CP clothing and really like it, but never quite bought into all of Wayne's descriptions. As a different kind of engineer and geologist, his descriptions did not make complete sense to me either.

    Anyways - I do have a question from your discussion:

    You initially say that "Steel is very stiff. If you want to transfer energy, using a lump of rigid steel to do it is a good way."

    I think your comments on Wayne mix up the perspective. In this case, the test is using the moving steel to transfer kinetic energy to the armor to see how much energy is absorbed. However, when I'm moving and my kinetic energy hits sufficiently thick steel (a bridge girder comes to mind), instruments on the steel are unlikely to measure much, if any, transfer of my kinetic energy. What little kinetic energy that is absorbed occurs by subtle flexing, friction, heat, deformation, or if it is perfectly rigid, it is transfered to and absorbed by the ground at its attachments. The rest of the energy is, unfortunately, absorbed by the "weaker" item that hit it - the bike, me, and the quad4 armor. Obviously, the less energy the body is asked to absorb the better. If I were to hit a girder, clearly not enough of that energy from that impact would be abosrbed or transfered out of the impact by the girder and I and my quad4 armor would have to absorb the rest. Just like a hammer hitting the girder - the hammer bounces back and absorbs (along with the arm that swung it) much of the kinetic energy in that impact, and just a little kinetic energy is absorbed by the girder in heat or transfered to the ground.

    Your steel statement seems to contradict your comment further down that says "The forces in a bad bike crash are so large that the armor needs to be reasonably stiff - or not feel soft to the touch - to absorb the impact."

    So, which is it - does steel transfer or absorb?

    It does seem to me that armor needs to find that balance between soft/flexible to absorb as much energy as possible while remaining somewhat stiff for durability and strong enough to spread (transfer) what it can't absorb over aa wide an area on the body as possible. All, of course, without sacrifcing comfort and good looks.
  10. Josh69

    Josh69 Uhhh

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2007
    Oddometer:
    594
    Location:
    Euroland
    First off, since you were talking about hitting metal bridge beams and I was talking about hitting a pole - if you hit a hard object like these head-on, then the crash is probably not survivable.

    Look at it this way: people in cars wrap themselves around poles or trees and with a metre of crumple zone in front of them plus airbags and they still get killed. 20 millimetres of foam padding, no matter how good it is, in a motorcycle jacket is not going to save you.


    I'm also going to stop referring to 'energy' and refer to force. Energy absorption is hard to measure which is why the Euro test standard measures force transferred.

    The Motoport Quad Armor from what I've read is about 20mm thick.
    Case 1: 20mm thick steel plate. It is essentially completely rigid. Whatever you hit it with gets transferred direct to the other side.

    Case 2: 20mm thick quilt full of duck feathers. Really soft and comfortable. However even minor impacts fully compress the feathers so it is ineffective as armor.

    Case 3: 20mm Motoport armor or EU spec armor. Relatively stiff; takes a lot of force to fully compress it. This is the happy medium which reduces the force transmitted from one side of the motorcycle jacket to your body on the other side.



    Wayne or whoever wrote the Motoport website does not appear to understand the physics of impacts. It does however look like Motoport have looked at a very large number of real crashes and even if they don't have much of an idea technically, they have seen what works and what doesnt.






  11. TallRob

    TallRob Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,395
    Location:
    Agoura Hills ,Ca
    If memory serves, I believe wayne told me that the quad armor works on deceleration of an impact first and then spreading the force second. Whereas armor that has a hard plastic does not decelerate and impact nearly as much and can move internally much easier due to its slick surface. It made sense to me as when I crashed My hard plastic CE pads moved and actually speared my knee and elbow. They were tightly bound in the jacket and pants but the poppers to seat everything down came undone in the crash. Series 2 Transistion Jacket and Pants. Dont buy'em.The bruises were not fun to deal with for the following month. Obviosly i am not an engineer. Nor did I stay at a Holiday Inn.
  12. TallRob

    TallRob Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,395
    Location:
    Agoura Hills ,Ca
    "you bring some clarity to Wayne's world."

    Way!, Yeah Way! Pshah! Awesome!
  13. poonbean

    poonbean gottago

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Oddometer:
    44
    Location:
    Orinda, CA
    Well - I just finished up a 2.5 week 5,500 mile trip from San Francisco to Alburq to Helena and back to SF. The trip north was with Rawhyde on their northbound Great Divide Ride - roughly 2,200 miles along the Continental Divide and I'll guess 500 or so miles on slab, the rest on dirt, gravel, mud, roads, water crossings, two track, and single track. Awesome fun and challenging.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    The motoport gear performed extremely well, took a beating, saved my knees, back, elbows, and shoulders and survived some pretty solid impacts to gravel and rock and dirt and sage brush without a scratch - unlike my KTM, which looks even better, now. I crashed at least 6 times on day one, perhaps 3 on day two, and once or twice on days 3 and 4 - then no more dumping after I got my skills dialed in. Last year during 4 days in the Mojave I wore a compression setup with strap on knees, and neither I nor the geared faired nearly as well. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    The cycleport marathon jacket and overpant setup, all air mesh, was super comfy, breathable and cool in CA, NV, NM, CO, and WY and with the liners was fine in the rain and wind above the snow line in WY and MT and ID. I blasted through death valley at noon on Aug 3 and was fine - of course moving at about 95-105 mph helped, too. This gear now replaces my shorter and tighter air mesh jacket and street jean setup - currently for sale. Highly recommended.[FONT='Verdana','sans-serif']<o:p> </o:p>[/FONT]
  14. frog13

    frog13 Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,378
    Location:
    SW Ohio
    Sounds like you should have done more research.I have the overpants and there just fine.Wayne advises on the site as to which pair fits in a particular way.....you should of done better homework!.:deal:D