motorcycle after scooter?

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by griff199, May 21, 2012.

  1. griff199

    griff199 n00b

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    I've been lurking here for some time, mostly in the "Thumpers" section. I have a 14 mile commute daily, currently on the Vespa S150. Wouldn't trade the 2-wheel commute for a car in a second, but there are a few nagging issues I'm looking to solve:

    1. A bit more weight (wind stability)
    2. A bit more HP
    3. Limited range

    Anyone gone this route getting a dual-sport or adventure bike, only to later regret spending the $?
    #1
  2. jesionowski

    jesionowski Chicagoland Burgman

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    I just sold my Honda Shadow 750 because i just wasnt putting enough miles on it. I switch up between my Kymco Agility 125 and my Burgman 400. The scooter are just so much easier. Faster start up, The honda took two or three minutes to warm up. Plus if it rained it was a pain to clean the bike. The scooter just start and go. I just let the rain wash them. I know what you mean about not having the range on a small scooter, and I do get blown around occasional. maybe think about getting a bigger scooter to give you the range and weight you want.
    #2
  3. Bsimon

    Bsimon Adventurer

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    I have the same type of commute as you and went from a Kymco 125 to a Piaggio BV250 and couldn't be happier.
    #3
  4. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    How do you like the S150? been thinking about getting one. Local dealer has a new '09 leftover at a good price. I already have a Vino 125 and a Genuine Stella 2 stroke. When it comes to scooters, I like them small. Much bigger, and I prefer a motorcycle. The Yamaha XT225 makes an excellent commuter, and in my opinion is the best small displacement dual sport bike ever made. I like it so much I have two, one set up for off road (but still street legal) and one set up for street use, with street tires. If you want new, I recommend the XT250. It is the most comfortable of the small dual sports. If you want a small street bike, I would definitely consider the Suzuki TU250X. If you are not over about 5' 4", the Rebel 250 is also a good choice.
    #4
  5. gogogordy

    gogogordy Long timer

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    I have both, a Vespa GTs250 and a DR 650.

    Sometimes you feel like a scooter ride, somedays you don't.

    Just saying...
    #5
  6. hugemoth

    hugemoth Long timer

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    IMO a scooter is a better commuter because of the weather protection. I ride a dual sport now though because I live in an area with lots of forest and desert roads to explore.
    #6
  7. btcn

    btcn Long timer

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    Either a big maxi scoot, or motorcycle.

    Yea, same here. My old 86 Elite 150 it's a rocket off the line for what it is, and its a blast. But on the open road its nearly gutless. It'll do 65 MPH GPS, but thats WFO and feels like abuse. 55 MPH is alright but its happier at 50 MPH and under. And yea the wind is a bitch.

    But heavy winds aren't always fun until you get to a Goldwing or bagger with loads of torque and protection where you hardly notice.

    Range? Yea many bikes suffer not just scoots. My Shadow 700 has a range comfortably only about 130 miles or so. 160 miles is about the limit, depends on how youse riding. Many bikes has the same problems.

    Just look at MPG [actual], and tank size. But hey, if you really want range, do what I do, get a lawn mower type 2 gallon gas tank and bungie it on!:deal Cheap, and big range, and more comforting on them long middle o nowhere rides.

    Or, you can get saddle bags and stuff a 1 gallon gas tank in each side. If you really don't feel comfortable you can buy them metal ones like you see on the back of jeeps. But I ain't had one blow up yet.

    HP? cc and bike type of course.


    For touring and my long distances, I pefer cruisers over scoots. But, for in town and zipping around hard to beat a scoot!
    #7
  8. CaseyJones

    CaseyJones Ridin' that train

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    I've found the Burgman 400 has higher top speed, better economy and equivalent power of small-to-midsize bikes. That, and better wind protection, too; and no messing with clutch or gearshift.

    I got on a Burg 400 from a Virago 250, great economy but much too small a frame for me. And much, much lower top-end speed. From there, I later had a Savage 650...temperamental on a cold start; MUCH lower power and economy in the low 40s. Top speed under eighty. And a TU250 wouldn't do over 65 without me tucking. Only a 1982 Honda Silver Wing 500, with the CX motor, came close - but the parts pipeline was shut off.

    No, I think the 400-class maxi-scooter is THE most advanced cycle design out there for all-around utility and economy.
    #8
  9. griff199

    griff199 n00b

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    I have no experience on a Stella, but vs. the Vino 125 it is night/day. The center of gravity is higher on the S150 vs. Vino, suspension is way better, brakes are better, and being what seems like 12" higher vastly improves ability to see and be seen in traffic.

    A lot of support for the scoots in here, and I certainly share the opinion that it makes a good commute - I've put 13,000 miles on the S150, probably 80% of that commuting. However - it's not an either or, I'm not selling the S150 and soon will get a '67 small frame 50cc back on the road.
    #9
  10. lifer

    lifer Been here awhile

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    I do not think a dual sport will give you any better ride in wind than your scooter. I have a DRZ400 and on the express way at 70 mph it gets blown around a lot. In rain it is even worse. You need to go to a large heavy bike to not be blown around. I would think you would need a silverwing or a burgman 650. Plus the tires on a dual sport do not help it from being blown around. That said I like having a dual sport, but I live in the middle of the woods and there are forest roads every wear. I have a set of saddle bags on my drz and that helps a lot to make it more versitile. I have dirt bagz, you can find them on the internet. I also do not like not having weather protection, something a scooter can not be beat at for their size. The milage on my DRZ is not great either it only gets about 47 mpg geared the way I have it and with stock gearing it is in the mid 50s so a 2.5 gal tank that has a 1/2 gal reserve does not get you very far.
    #10
  11. knucklehead90

    knucklehead90 Been here awhile

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    I have a 650 Burgman and find it gets blown around in the wind fairly easily. I'm comparing it against my last ride - a Harley Electra Glide Ultra which was quite stable even in hard side winds - and buffeting on freeways was minimal.

    I'm sure the lighter weight bikes/scooters are the more susceptible they are to side winds and buffeting on highways generally speaking - and I'm sure there are exceptions for those bikes/scoots that are lower profile. If someone were used to a 150/250 scooter or motorcycle and stepped up to the 650 Burgman they'd probably think it is quite stable. A matter of perspective of course depending on which side of the perspective 'lens' you're coming from.
    #11
  12. hexnut

    hexnut Been here awhile

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    My Kymco People S 250 gets blown around some, but nothing like the Kymco People 150 I had. I don't remember any of my Harleys getting blown around.
    #12
  13. Sportsman Matt

    Sportsman Matt Xtremely Bad Example

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    Unless you plan on going off road, the dual sport is not that great an option, unless you have a 36" in seam.
    Most Dual Sports have a high seat height because they have a high ground clearance, versus a streeet bike which usually has between a 4 to 6" ground clearance.

    I still run my Big Ruckus around, but the commuter has become a HD XL883N, and I will say this. It was money well spent, and the commute has become a little more fun, mainly because you can Ton Up!
    #13
  14. topless

    topless Been here awhile

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    I had a little bit of an unusual bike progression on my 12.5 mile commute: I started with a CT90, it did fine, but no highway ability. Moved to SL125, still highway limited with 60 mph top speed and no cargo, I had a box on the CT90. Then went to a DRZ400, converted to supermoto, with a small bag on luggage rack. It was kinda fun, had really loud exhaust and plenty fast. Then got a Zuma 125 and lost the highway, but really got into CVT and underseat storage. Now I'm on a Burgman 400 and it's the best of anything I've ridden. Has everything I need, huge underseat storage, plus easy to use cargo net on the back, fast, weather protection and I can use it like a car, where the smaller scooter and motorcycles just won't work running errands.
    #14
  15. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer

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    You can't beat a scooter for commuting. The only good reason to get a dual sport is if you want to ride off road or the roads you ride are in really bad shape. As for being blown around, I have owned many bikes of all kinds and never had that problem with any of them. For commuting I would recommend getting a larger scooter, at least a 250. My Aprilia 250 does just fine at highway speeds, doesn't get blown around but needs a windshield if you want good wind protection. For highway commuting I would consider one of the new Kymco 300s or the new Piaggio BV350. I really don't see the need for a 400 or larger unless you are planning some long distance highway touring.
    #15
  16. aidanpryde18

    aidanpryde18 Adventurer

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    I have a Honda Silver Wing and I put ~12,000 miles on it in the last year. It was my only bike and I commuted on it every day. I also used it for long trips.

    Just recently I went through the same issue and I recently picked up a Wee-Strom. I just picked up a 45L Givi top case for it and have commuted on it for the last couple of weeks. I also took the Strom on a couple of weekend rides. On back roads the Strom beats the Silver Wing hands down. Much more stable and planted through corners and gas mileage is roughly equivalent.

    In-town, I do miss the auto trans but not a great deal. Honestly, I have to remind myself to ride the Swing once a week just to run it.

    I might feel differently next winter if I miss the wind protection on cold mornings, but as of now, I am seriously considering selling the Swing because I don't see much use for it. My thought is that I might sell it and pick up a 250 scooter around winter time to use for quick hops to the store and rain/cold commuting only.

    I really like the idea of having a mid-size scoot for utility and an ADV for everything else.
    #16
  17. HandKPhil

    HandKPhil Been here awhile

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    I agree. I think a dual-sport and a mid-sized scooter covers just about all the bases for me. I have a KLR250 for dirt road exploration and trips out to the country, and a Yamaha Majesty 400 for blasting around in the suburbs.

    I just visited my brother last Sunday, and drove the Majesty. He lives about 18-20 miles away, and the road going to his house has speed limits ranging from 45-60 mph. Some of the drive is a nicely manicured, 4-lane boulevard with a limit of 45, and the rest is a smooth, 2-lane blacktop road with a 60 mph limit. The Majesty's right in the middle of it's powerband at those speeds, and has lots of power left over to pass. It's a great bike for moving through light-to-medium traffic.

    The only improvement I would want to make to my dual-sport/scooter combo would be to upgrade to a newer dual-sport (like a WR250R), and a faster scooter (like a TMax) :D
    #17
  18. HandKPhil

    HandKPhil Been here awhile

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    Here's a picture of my combo: (tank not included)
    [​IMG]
    #18
  19. ohgood

    ohgood Long timer

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    i went: learner > Dual Sport > sport bike > scooter > scooter & DualsSport

    I put the dualsport in the truck for stuff that is more than 100 miles away (usually dirty rides). Guess it's kind of a trailer queen ?


    No, you will not regret the dualsport on a commute. I'm not going to say you can't do x on a y bike, cause we all know that statement if false for the right people. ;-) ..... but hopping curbs and ROOSTING THE FUCK out of people instead of breaking their mirrors off is fantastic.








    I mean, i saw it on youtube. I've nevvvvvvvver done that.
    #19
  20. griff199

    griff199 n00b

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    Good input you guys, I really appreciate the feedback. Funny, I've never seen so much talk among men re: inseam. :rofl

    I'm 6'3" so I would guess I can hop on most factory bikes and make contact with the ground. RE the dirt road stuff, I feel like I'll never know until I have a bike that can make that journey fun (vs sketchy), but you've all got me wondering.
    #20