Motorcycle for Kids?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by wiseblood, Dec 1, 2012.

  1. wiseblood

    wiseblood Hall Monitor

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    Hey All!

    With the wife's blessing, I'm thinking of getting my 8-year-old some sort of motorized motorcycle, and I could use your help!

    Here's my situation:

    1. I live in New York City, so I don't have easy access to a big yard or land. I do live in a very residential area, so the streets are quiet enough for her to go around the various blocks (on the sidewalk for now, I guess). FYI, I also do not have a garage (though, I do have a private backyard, and may erect a shed).

    2. We do have relatively easy access to her school playground which is mostly empty on weekend. Also, there's Flushing Meadow Park nearby, as well as at least one other medium-sized park. None of these areas would (legally) welcome a dirtbike.

    3. My daughter has been riding a bicycle for about four years, and she's asked NUMEROUS times for a motorcycle. However, she's never been on one, and kids are fickle.


    So, my first thought is to get an electric bike. I've been looking at the Razor MX650:

    http://www.amazon.com/Razor-MX650-R...?ie=UTF8&qid=1354397347&sr=8-1&keywords=mx650

    [​IMG]

    Here's a bad video of a few future ADV members and their probably very responsible parents watching:

    <iframe width="480" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/AugCk35id0Q?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    :lol3


    So, my thoughts are this: If I get electric, it's silent, and I'm likely to be able to let her ride in all sorts of local places which would otherwise frown upon a gas bike.


    Any thoughts? I'm trying to keep this within about $500 (not including gear).

    Thanks!
    #1
  2. Bucho

    Bucho DAMNrider

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    OSET electric trials bike

    Maybe more expensive then you are thinking of (even used). But electric is definently the way to go for your purposes. I also have a tiny yard. Have one for my son. We use it on a local elementary school field.

    Goodluck
    #2
  3. viverrid

    viverrid not dead yet

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    If it was my neighborhood I would NOT want an 8 year old (or anyone) riding a dirt bike on the sidewalk which even smaller kids, baby carriages, and adult pedestrians would also be using. But yeah, electric in a field and you are more likely to get away with it than with a combustion motor.

    You live in a big city, it's not the best place for that sort of thing.
    #3
  4. JRP

    JRP Old guy

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    This doesn't sound like a really good idea for an 8 year old


    "New York State's Vehicle and Traffic Law defines a limited use motorcycle as a "low-speed vehicle with two or three wheels." Under this interpretation mopeds and scooters are considered limited use motorcycles which means they must adhere to motorcycle registration and licensing laws.
    Mopeds and Scooters

    Even though non-owners may not treat mopeds and scooters as serious bikes, the New York Department of Motor Vehicles (MVD) treats them very seriously. Mopeds and scooters, just like motorcycles, require full registration and a driver's license to operate.


    To register you must visit a DMV office and bring:
    • Proof of ownership. A Manufacturer's Certificate of Origin (MCO), a bill of sale, or a previous registration that was transferred over to you will suffice as rock-solid proof.
    • Cash, check, or credit card to pay all applicable fees.
    Moped and Scooter Classifications

    The DMV divides mopeds and scooters into three classifications (A, B, and C) based on top speed. Each class comes with specific requirements and restrictions.
    Class A reaches top speeds between 30 and 40 mph, requires a class M/MJ license, and can operate in any traffic lane.
    Class B reaches top speeds between 20 and 30 mph, does not require a specific license, and can only operate in either the right hand lane or along the shoulder.
    Class C reaches top speeds of 20 mph or less, does not require a specific license, and can only operate in either the right hand lane or along the shoulder.
    Other Bikes

    The good news is that go-karts, mini-bikes, dirt bikes, and motor-assisted bicycles do not have to be registered. But the bad news is that none of these contraptions can operate on any public street, highway, sidewalk, or parking lot."
    #4
  5. wiseblood

    wiseblood Hall Monitor

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    Class C: Less than 20 mph. :deal

    As far as "sidewalk versus street": Yes, nobody wants a dangerous situation. However, under 12 you are permitted to ride a bicycle on the sidewalk.

    All that being said, my goal would be to wean her off that ASAP. (We already do family bike rides in the street.)


    Still, I haven't decided. Another open question: What would I do for transport? My car is a Mini (which is extra-hilarious if you ever met me -- I'm 6' 11" tall. :lol3). Any did suggestions for a super-small trailer?
    #5
  6. JRP

    JRP Old guy

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    All require a license, Class A requires a motorcycle one and the other classes do not.


    http://trailerinabag.com/index.html

    You can get a hitch for the Mini also
    #6
  7. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    Being stuck in the big city and in your situation, I'd be looking for something electric for the kiddo to ride in the parks. I think you could get away with that a LOT easier than something with an IC engine.

    I would not feel comfortable having her riding around in the street, even in neighborhoods, on anything resembling a motorcycle.
    #7
  8. Hurricane Bob

    Hurricane Bob Long timer

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    I don't think it's going to be an issue.....:*sip*



    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/TIizKuv2yfY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>



    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/YtZlljZ4CTE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    #8
  9. dualsportride

    dualsportride Been here awhile

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    What I did for this same situation was got my son an electric bike like your talking about, but the crotch rocket type. I got a used one on craigs list for under $20 because they didn't want to replace the batteries. I then got the batteries from Battery Shark for $35 for the pair of batteries.

    Battery Link
    #9
  10. Idle

    Idle Been here awhile

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    I think a trailer might be too big of a hassle for you. Just ride to the riding area on your bicycle. If you keep the speed down around 10-15 or so you shouldn't have any problem with LEO at all.
    #10
  11. Seth650

    Seth650 Been here awhile

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    Those "riders" endanger themselves and everyone around, and the dirt bikes are always stolen property when LE seizure is so risked [as well as running-hours wasted on enduro motors by riding straight, flat, cager-tarmac], so the idiots :lol3 can just dump the bikes if a LE pursuit ends down a no-outlet sidestreet. But being it's NYC-Bronx where there's no clear evil, just shades of good, for certain groups :deal, a taxpayers' mess results instead:

    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20120820/hunts-point/passenger-fatal-dirt-bike-accident-suing-police-for-20-million :muutt

    #11