Motorcycle Industry is Doomed

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by HelmetHead Cycle, Jan 7, 2013.

  1. urbanXJ

    urbanXJ Long timer

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    go to any track day and I see plenty of young folks
    #81
  2. MOzarkRider

    MOzarkRider Adventurer

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    I disagree with this statement. Of course depending on your location a motorcycle is much cheaper form of transportation than a car.

    New car costs avg. around $25K insurance is $100 a month, and it gets an mpg avg of 25 (of course this is all reletive)
    Maintenance on the car costs around $500 a year, this factors in tires, oil changes, brakes, ect..

    New bike costs avg. around $9000 if your not buying a Harley, Insurance is about the same, Avg. mpg is around 45 with some going very high, and maintenance is about the same. Add gear for $1500

    If you live in a climate that allows for year round riding, IE no Ice and snow. Then the motorcycle is clearly a cheaper way to get around.

    If you look at the used market you can get a decent running bike that is capable of sustaining highway speeds for less than $2300. Add a decent helmet $150, a decent used jacket and pants $250 max, and some rain wear if the jacket and pants aren't waterproof. And you still come out with a dirt cheap mode of transportation. It costs pennies per day to opperate.

    I know because I did this for 3 years, only having my 92 yamaha XJ600 to get me to work, college, and abroad. I paid $1050 for the bike and have only put around $500 into it, maintenance wise in the last 3 years.

    Of course if you do not live in a climate where there is no snow/ice like where I moved to now, you kinda have to have a car.
    #82
  3. atomicalex

    atomicalex silly aluminum boxes

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    Not at all.

    Sure, riding can be a sport. But only when you want it to be. Otherwise, it's transportation. Or testing out your latest mod. Or looking cool on sunday afternoon in the park. Or whatever you want it to be.
    #83
  4. Sticky Throttle

    Sticky Throttle Happy wanderer

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    Wow. High marks for intelligent, broad-minded comments.
    #84
  5. Pantah

    Pantah Red Sox Nation

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    How is it that such an innocent comment as calling 'motorcycling' a 'sport', invites so many strong opinions?
    #85
  6. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    only if your motorcycle is less than 500cc and your comparing it to a 3/4 ton pickup


    compare a 600cc or larger bike to an economy car, the car wins with lower cost per mile every day of week
    #86
  7. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    We'll just put you in the "not a racer" category then. :D
    #87
  8. Sticky Throttle

    Sticky Throttle Happy wanderer

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    And then you'd be wrong again.
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  9. Ninja 1

    Ninja 1 Adventurer

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    I'm twenty six and been riding for well over ten years, only the last four years have I passed my test and got onto bigger bikes.

    One problem is too much redtape surrounding tests and motorcycle ownership which really doesn't help the situation. Most of my peers look into sitting their bike tests and are forever scratching their heads to the regulations. I totally agree, life is already complicated enough. Why make motorcycle freedom more complicated than it should be? FFS relax the rules abit. Make it more accessible to the masses for the industry's benefit!

    The costs involved in basic training aswell is totally unfair, I got in there early but prices have doubled in the last four years. Instructors have priced the training so it's now out of reach from the average joe. And is now more of a luxury for the well off as so to speak.

    As for fuel prices fluctuating, lets not forget you need to remember cars are forever getting more and more economical aswell, motorcycles will never replace cars solely based on fuel economy. I'd say the Nissan I drive is more economical than my 2008 FZ1N as an example. Keeps me sheltered from the environment, moves my dogs around etc etc.

    Motorcycles are just not playing such an important role as they use to in modern society and have no where near the importance as they did back in the day. Sadly, most people wont have that kind of exposure to the enjoyment from the interest to spur them on.
    #89
  10. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    So... What do you race? :ear
    #90
  11. tundra61

    tundra61 I wish I had a title

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    If younger riders are on the decline, I suppose price could have something to do with it, but I think all the restrictions on off road riding also has a big effect,

    I know for me personally, had I not ridden dirt fro the ages of 10-17 I would have probably never bought my first street bike when I was old enough.

    Also, I have many friends at BMW NA and their bike sales have never been better.
    #91
  12. MOzarkRider

    MOzarkRider Adventurer

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    :huh What part of the budget am I missing then? Cause cost per mile (if we're comparing a reliable car with a reliable motorcycle) the motorcycle is cheaper. Of course it may not be the most economical cause you cannot haul things like the rest of your family but that is not what I am claiming.
    #92
  13. viverrid

    viverrid not dead yet

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    Somebody looking for economical transportation and considering a motorcyle to save money, doesn't buy an average car. You can get a NEW economy car for $12,000 and it can get 30 - 35 MPG. It is enclosed from the rain and snow and dust and cold, and has heat. You don't have to get put on riding gear. It will be MUCH safer in a collision. It will have cargo space for a grocery run or shopping trip. Oh yeah, and less likely to get stolen.

    For the typical U.S. resident a car is much more practical as a single vehicle. A motorcycle would typically be an add-on for nice weather. (Don't bother posting up that you have a bike-only; you're the exception, you can even consider yourself a friggin' hero, okay?) For SPORT; in the U.S. motorcycles are seldom transportation and mostly sport or hobby.

    In Europe cities are chock full of scooters and smaller motos parked in every little corner. In U.S. cities people post all the time about theft or damage and parking tickets, so even though it is difficult and expensive to park a car, it is iffy if a motorcycle offers much advantage. Unless fuel here goes up to say $7/gallon, the fuel savings are not going to be enough to compensate for the reduced practicality.

    You can keep trying to preach to the choir on a moto forum, but bikes are NOT usually "transportation" in the U.S. Look around most any workplace parking lot. Cars, cars, cars. Motos are predominately for hobby or "sport".
    #93
  14. monkeythumpa

    monkeythumpa When I go slow, I go fast

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    There are a couple trends that are influencing the notion that the industry is in decline, but in no way (unless the health and safety nazis get their way) is the industry "doomed".

    First is economic. If by youth you are referring to the "millennials" or the generation who spent their formative years around the turn of the century, then their purchasing ability has been severely restricted by the worst economic climate in 90 years. Surveys have indicated that millennials don't want the hassle of owning their own car or motocycle and prefer public transportation or car sharing. But it is unclear whether it is really a cultural change or purely a result of a generation that is learning to be more frugal. 53% of recent college grads are un- or under-employed.

    The second trend is the rebelliousness of youth and blazing their own path. If you can, remember what it was like growing up. You didn't want to act/dress/drive/associate with brands like an old person, anyone over 30. Harley is intentionally chasing the Boomer generation and are succeeding in extracting their dollars. The number of "boomerang" riders out on the road are the fasting growing segment. On the other hand, millenials see H-D as bikes for their parents and are not interested. Instead I see them flocking to anything anti-cruiser; hipster mopeds and scooters or for those with some money sexy Ducatis, or the most recent trend, the motard.

    The decline is cyclical. As the economy improves motos will be an option for more young people. But don't expect the industry to look like what you are used to. The next generation will blaze their own path and will shape the future to fit their needs as their purchasing power rises and Boomers increasingly hang up their helmets.
    #94
  15. Sticky Throttle

    Sticky Throttle Happy wanderer

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    I used to race motocross. You?
    #95
  16. MOzarkRider

    MOzarkRider Adventurer

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    Sure you could make the argument that there are economy cars that get 35 MPG but I was taking an Average because you can also purchase a NEW Ninja250 or CBR250 economy motorcycle for $4000 and get 65 MPG. Add $1500 for gear and still be cheaper than an economy car.

    And again I cannot argue that a car offers protection against the elements and can carry your family. I own a car because I need to get stuff that my bike cannot carry like kids and groceries and such.

    The point I am making is that mile per mile a motorcycle will cost you less money to transport yourself around.
    #96
  17. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    So at one point riding was indeed a "sport" :1drink
    #97
  18. Bowtie76

    Bowtie76 Been here awhile

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    Let me fix that for you since your highlighter obviously broke:deal

    #98
  19. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    So you're saying your a poseur then. :lol3
    #99
  20. cybrdyke

    cybrdyke In the Dark

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    Is this your opinion or do you have stats to back it up?