MOTUS: New Sport Tourer to be built in Alabama

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by Reverend12, Sep 23, 2009.

  1. Mobiker

    Mobiker Long timer

    Joined:
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    Been there done that. Had a great time everytime, except the time I decided to pound across on I-70. State of mind and all that.

    Nothing against cc BTW.
  2. 10/10ths

    10/10ths Road Trip Fool

    Joined:
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    ....This new Motus appears to be a fantastic Sport-Touring Motorcycle.

    I am a big fan of ABS, Traction control, and other electronics that make riding safer and more fun.

    While I'm still not convinced that an electronic throttle is better than a steel cable on a motorcycle, I do understand the engineering argument FOR such systems. I don't know if I want one, but I understand how they can make the bike perform better, and that can't be a bad thing.

    As far as the Motus having factory cruise control, this machine is a brand new engineering effort from the ground up. I think they have their hands full just building a brand new engine, fuel management system, and chassis, without adding cruise control to the "to do" list.

    In my mind, cruise control, satellite radio, GPS Navigation, communication systems, everything that is secondary to the act of riding the motorcycle, is better handled by aftermarket farkles. I have a communication tank bag from RKA Luggage that handles my GPS, Sat Rad, telephone, two-way radio, CB radio, etc., all blue-toothed with no wires into my helmet. I can take it from bike to bike. It's better than ANY factory system.

    So, Cruise Control, here is a SIMPLE, CHEAP, cruise control that you can put on your new MOTUS.

    Stop crying about the OEM fitment and just buy this:

    Go Cruise Throttle Control

    [​IMG] <ins style="display:inline-table;border:none;height:280px;margin:0;padding:0;position:relative;visibility:visible;width:336px"><ins id="aswift_0_anchor" style="display:block;border:none;height:280px;margin:0;padding:0;position:relative;visibility:visible;width:336px"></ins></ins>


    GoCruise Throttle Control Review
    by Brandon Jackson for webBikeWorld.com
    More:
    &#9642; wBW
    Reviews Home
    &#9642; Owner Comments (Below)
    &#9642; wBW Motorcycle Cruise Control Reviews
    Summary
    A simply elegant throttle lock device for motorcycles.
    Introduction
    I live in the southeast United States, an area with a great variety of different roads on which to ride.
    Do you like to cruise and enjoy the scenery? We've got it.
    Do you prefer twisty, technical riding? We have that as well.
    One problem around here, however, is that getting to those fun and interesting ribbons of asphalt requires some time on the interstate. It’s not a necessity but it does save a lot of time.
    I have no objection to riding on the interstate highway system but it can be a bit boring and monotonous.
    As a result, even after only 20 or 30 minutes of riding on the "Superslab", I'm moving around in the seat, stretching my legs, flexing my hands -- I mean hand -- the left one specifically.
    Of course, when riding a motorcycle, that right hand must remain on the throttle at all times on the highway.
    Sure, you can pull in the clutch while you let go of the throttle for a moment -- but a moment is about all you’re going to get and remain safe.
    If you do a lot of long-distance travel, then the obvious solution is a cruise control or throttle lock. For large touring rigs, such as Honda’s Gold Wing, there are real cruise control units that actually monitor the speed of the bike and maintain a consistent speed through the use of servos and electronics. These cruise control systems are similar to what one might find in a car.
    For most motorcycle owners though, a simple throttle lock will do the job, providing relief to that right hand for a minute or two during a long ride.
    Throttle Locks
    A throttle lock is just what it sounds like: a device that simple holds the throttle grip in place at a set point through the use of pressure or other force applied to the grip.
    This approach keeps the fuel flowing at a consistent rate, but of course the motorcycle may speed up or slow down, depending on changes in the angle of the road over hills and valleys or even changes in wind speed and direction.
    Over the past several decades, lots of different designs and approaches have been developed to hold that right hand grip in place. These have ranged from simple and low cost solutions to complex and surprisingly expensive ones.
    Today we’re going to take a look at a device that is low cost, very simple, and dare I say, elegant.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    BUY YOUR
    &#9642; Go Cruise Throttle Control[​IMG]
    &#9642; Motorcycle Throttle Locks
    At the wBW Amazon.com Store!

    The Go Cruise Throttle Control
    A small, lightweight piece of plastic. That sums up the Go Cruise Throttle lock. One piece, no moving parts, no springs and no electronics. It really doesn’t get simpler than this.
    The only accessory is a broad silicone rubber ring, included with the Go Cruise to help improve grip on certain throttle grips.
    The Go Cruise is available in two different sizes to accommodate 7/8" or 1" handlebars. It is also available in different colors to suit your taste; black and silver are available in both the small and large sizes and there is a new chrome version available in the large (1") size only.
    The Go Cruise is 3-7/8 inches (97 mm) long and has an opening at one end where the "jaws" can be spread open to fit around and clamp onto the motorcycle's throttle grip.
    Go Cruise includes simple instructions, warning you about the "wrong" way to grab it and open it. Heeding this warning will keep you from breaking the device when putting it on your grip.
    To engage the Go Cruise, simply hold the throttle at the desired position and then use the index finger to rotate the device until the end is resting on the brake lever. To disengage it, simply rotate the throttle grip forward to close the throttle.
    Doing so will rotate the Go Cruise back to a neutral position so it is no longer holding the throttle grip and it is back in an easy to access position for its next use.
    The design is so simple that I'm surprised that no one else has come up with this concept until now (if someone did I missed it!). Many throttle lock systems require removal and re-installation of some of the throttle parts, replacement of the bar-ends, and/or other similar "hoops" to be leapt through. The Go Cruise has no such requirements save for installing on the silicone band on the throttle grip if needed.
    [​IMG]
    Installing the GoCruise Throttle Lock: 1. This is the silicone ring included in the kit.
    [​IMG]
    2. Install the silicone ring on the throttle grip.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    BUY YOUR
    Posi-Lock Connectors
    From webBikeWorld.com!

    Posi-Lock Kits and Assortment Packs
    Read the wBW Posi-Lock Review

    [​IMG]
    3. Place the GoCruise Throttle Lock over the throttle (shown from in front of handlebars).
    [​IMG]
    4. Go Cruise Throttle Control installed on the grip.
    [​IMG]
    BUY YOUR
    &#9642; Go Cruise Throttle Control[​IMG]
    &#9642; Motorcycle Throttle Locks
    At the wBW Amazon.com Store!

    The "Perfect" Motorcycle Cruise Control?
    Sounds nearly perfect, and it almost is. The issue I’ve run in to is that on my bike, with my grips, is that the Go Cruise can slip a little bit after it is set. Also, I have a set of Oxford heated grips on my Suzuki SV650 and, as it turns out, these have both a good and a bad side effect when using the Go Cruise.
    On the plus side, the heated rips are a little larger in diameter than standard grips, and this helps ensure that the throttle lock has sufficient pressure on the grip.
    On the negative side though, the rubber surface of the heated grip is harder than average. As such, the Go Cruise doesn’t grip as well on the smooth, hard surface.
    Using the included silicone ring does help, but sometimes the GoCruise slips a little bit anyway. Engine vibration is also a factor, as the vibes making their way to the handlebars can make this worse.
    I can set the GoCruise on my throttle and it will hold there all day sitting in the driveway with the engine off. On the road with the engine running however, I’ve noticed the throttle can slowly slip on occasion. As the saying goes, "Your mileage may vary" and that’s quite appropriate here.
    I know people who use the Go Cruise and it holds steady on their machines even without the silicone accessory ring. In fact, Lee Conn, President of Motus Motorcycles (and the person who first introduced me to the GoCruise), has been using a Go Cruise on their MST Sport Touring prototypes during their tours around the country (read the Motus MST preview).
    When I noticed this issue with the GoCruise, I contacted the manufacturer, who suggested I try the included silicone ring (which I already had done) or even an additional one. He also offered to accept it for return if I wasn’t happy with it. I decided to keep it and possibly modify it myself if the slippage became a real issue.
    wBW Video: GoCruise Throttle Control


    <ins style="display:inline-table;border:none;height:60px;margin:0;padding:0;position:relative;visibility:visible;width:468px"></ins>Conclusion

    The Go Cruise Throttle Control is easy to install and use and the price of $19.95 with free shipping is very reasonable.
    The only problem is the compatibility with the particular grip material that might be found on your particular motorcycle. The manufacturer does state that the GoCruise is designed specifically for OEM grips, so perhaps it may have performed better if I didn't have the Oxford heated grips.
    The included silicone ring does help, especially on metal grips or grips that have a hard surface that is likely to slip against the plastic of the throttle lock. I think that maybe adding some sharp "dimples" or other type of rough texture to the contact points on the Go Cruise might be enough to overcome the slipping issue.
    As it stands I still have my Go Cruise installed on my bike and I do use it regularly on the highways. If I do decide to make some modifications I’ll be reporting back on how that works...or doesn't.


    I have two of them, and they are spectacular!!!




    :deal
  3. ObiJohn

    ObiJohn Screaming Banshee

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    I get all of the 'Buy American' vibe... but what will this bike honestly do better than a VFR1200? Yes, it's 100 lbs lighter, with about the same horsepower, but it's a largely unproven motor (Chevy small blocks aren't designed to live at above-3000 RPM for most of their service live) that has some design issues in a motorcycle. Like, headers that seem to be prone to damage or burning the rider due to the engine/chassis layout. I also wonder how the bike reacts to torque/revving the engine... does it want to twist around the crankshaft?

    It's an interesting bike, and I'd certainly like to look at one in person, but I guess I don't see enough of a differentiator to make me really lust after one. What am I missing?
  4. rocker59

    rocker59 diplomatico di moto

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    I'd say "not very", once you get down the list from Electra Glide/Goldwing/K-LT.
  5. rocker59

    rocker59 diplomatico di moto

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    It'll probably jump right out of your hands and lay down on its side, just like those damned Guzzis do...
  6. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Likely Lost.

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    ....and Rocket IIIs

    Honestly, its a non-factor, usually what they do is counter-spin the tranny (and shaft in the case of the rocket) which minimizes the torque over from the parallel mounted motor.

    On the Rocket you only notice motor pulling at idle, that is a 2300cc engine, so I doubt the Motus will be terribly intimidating.
  7. Gordon Bennett

    Gordon Bennett At least I tried

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2004
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    Rutland
    No they don't. Guzzis just nudge your thigh and say "come on, lets go"
  8. Lornce

    Lornce Lost In Place

    Joined:
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    That's enough to pique my interest, right there.

    :deal
  9. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin?

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    A whole bunch more torque is one thing your missing.

    Beyond that, if a small block chevy can't spend most of its life above 3000 rpm someone needs to tell 10's of thousands of boat owners that Mercruiser hosed them with an inadequate engine.

    It's all in how they are built - bore, stroke, cam grind, etc. You can make a small block chevy spend its life at 6000 rpm if that's what you want.
  10. RedRocket

    RedRocket Yeah! I want Cheesy Poofs

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    +1, and other than the basic design dimensions like bore spacing, crank spacing, etc, don't anyone think that a single part on this motor carries any Chevy part numbers. As for the 'fragile' exhaust positioning, how often are dumping your bikes?
  11. DynaSport

    DynaSport Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
    Oddometer:
    482
    I am heading over to Daytona on Wednesday and wondered if I would be able to see the Motus bike again this year. Last year I saw it in Daytona at the IMS. I went to the Motus web site and couldn't find anything on there about them being in Daytona. I clicked the Contact Us link and sent in a question about whether they would be in Daytona or not.

    This is the reply I got:


    Yes, Dan, we will definitely be there. Come by Daytona Ducati/Triumph/BMW Thursday-Saturday 3/15-3/17 and hang with us. The address is: 118 East Fairview Avenue, Daytona Beach, FL 32114 and it is really easy to find.

    We will have a couple of bikes on their patio and, if you can do me a big favor when you roll up- please tell one of the staff members that you came to see the Motus! The more grassroots interest/inquiries, the better chance that they will carry the brand for us.

    Files attached.

    See you down there.

    Lee Conn president



    I thought it was pretty cool to get a reply from the president. Very Buellish imo. So, I will be riding my Buell over to look at the Motus and make sure the dealership knows I am there to look at the Motus. Meet me there Thursday and say hi.
  12. DynaSport

    DynaSport Been here awhile

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  13. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    All right. Sounds like all the questions about pricing will be answered by bike week.

    It's gonna be expensive, but I think they're going to sell every one they make.
  14. DynaSport

    DynaSport Been here awhile

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  15. apessino

    apessino Long timer

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  16. Moronic

    Moronic Long timer

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    Damn!

    And with it, any likelihood of superior fuel economy, along with superior range from the 23L tank. :cry

    Still likely a great bike, and less chance of long periods inactive due to unfixable fuelling failures.

    Nevertheless, a key feature gone, IMO. Can't see how they'll make port injection work better than anyone else's.
  17. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Likely Lost.

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    I'm of two minds about it really.

    ...but I wasn't in the market for a sport tourer anyway.
  18. GB

    GB . Administrator

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    I was wondering the same thing too. For a sport tourer, GDI would have given it an even better range.

    GDI is on the cutting edge of the latest advancement in fuel injection and I hoping other manufacturers would follow Motus' lead on this.

    They're saying they dropped GDI after their extensive testing with it on the bike because they talked to dealers and enthusiasts and they want to offer a bike that owners can tinker with? :huh It's most likely a cost cutting thing, than a modification to let owners add a power commander. It's too bad GDI is gone.
  19. Moronic

    Moronic Long timer

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    Have to admit, that does sound more than merely plausible. :lol3
  20. omnivore

    omnivore SuperSportTourer

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    Remember, with GDi, fuel pressure is enormously high. The injectors are insanely expensive to repair and replace, and are very highly susceptible to damage and deterioration from water or other contaminats in fuel. At high pressure, water can become as damaging as a laser, and etch the balls, valves and pintles in the injector, causing them to leak or fail.

    Last I checked, the average direct injector nozzle that my buddy replaced due to water contamination in fuel cost $560 each.

    Wandering around god knows where on a bike, it wouldn't be a bad thing for the bike to run on whatever kind of gas you happen upon.
    Maybe that's just me.