MOTUS: New Sport Tourer to be built in Alabama

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by Reverend12, Sep 23, 2009.

  1. kirb

    kirb should be out riding

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    To be fair, they sourced the euro version headlight....
  2. Mr. Canoehead

    Mr. Canoehead Taste Gunnels!

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    I doubt it. The Euro light wouldn't be DOT approved (or KTM would be using it).

    Sent from my Droid Tablet using Tapatalk
  3. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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  4. KMC1

    KMC1 There is no spoon.

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  5. 10/10ths

    10/10ths Road Trip Fool

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    ....the riding position combined with the V-4, make this a really desirable machine. If it had the original direct injection and ABS, it would be a no-brainer.

    Without.....

    I still can't get over how PERFECT the riding position was when I sat on one in Houston:

    [​IMG]
    Motus by Shooter158, on Flickr

    I have a 29 inseam and could flat foot that bike with Piloti driving shoes on.:deal
  6. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    It does have a "built from pieces" hot rod look to it that is very attractive. Not smooth and seamless like the Japanese or BMW sport tourers. I don't see it being a boring bike, but oh that price. That price is way above many very capable machines from several different manufacturers that have proven reliability, an established dealer network, and local service and parts availability.
  7. GI_JO_NATHAN

    GI_JO_NATHAN Long timer

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    Can y'all quit quoting him, so he's easier to ignore.
  8. Sierra Thumper

    Sierra Thumper Been here awhile

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  9. Sierra Thumper

    Sierra Thumper Been here awhile

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    At this point I'll be suprised if one can ever be bought......they really seem to be dragging their feet on this bike, makes me wonder if there's problems behind the scenes.
  10. eatpasta

    eatpasta Lawnmower Target

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    wait a sec - I thought that was the whole thing behind this bike?? When did the Direct injection and ABS get dropped? The ABS I kinda get but wasn't half the point of this bike that it was going to have a super modern American motor in it?
  11. rocker59

    rocker59 diplomatico di moto

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    Define "Super Modern".

    If pushrod V4 based on a Corvette's engine meets that criteria, then I guess they have it...

    :lol3
  12. Mr. Canoehead

    Mr. Canoehead Taste Gunnels!

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    GM's V-8 engines can reasonable be called "super modern". They are competitive in every way (power to weight, BSFC, flexibility) to other "super modern" V-8 engines (Ford, Toyota, Nissan, Chrysler). Even BMW, Audi and Mercedes have little advantage unless you look at M, RS or AMG engines and those engines cost a lot more to manufacture and service.

    Interesting article link comparing the GM V8 to the AMG V-8.

    I'm not a GM guy, I'm a Ford guy, but the Ford OHC V8 engines have no advantage over the GM pushrod engines and they are much harder to service and package in the vehicle. I think it is funny that pushrods are such a hot point for people. 40 years ago, the lowly pushrod was a mark of shame but not today. BMW R-bikes had pushrods up to the camhead. Guzzi has always had pushrods.

    I do think it is unfortunate that Motus dropped the DI system, though - GM's new V8's do have that, along with cylinder deactivation.
  13. Sierra Thumper

    Sierra Thumper Been here awhile

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    The whole selling point for the Motus seems to be the engine, which is a sweet piece indeed :evil
    But why couldn't they base a much more cost effective bike around that same engine, bring the price down around 10 grand, and still have a VERY unique bike that piques everybodies interest, and that more folks could actually afford? If it was competitively priced with its competitition, it would sell like hotcakes based on its uniqueness alone.
  14. rocker59

    rocker59 diplomatico di moto

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    Something tells me the engine in the MOTUS would set you back ten grand. Plus.
  15. rocker59

    rocker59 diplomatico di moto

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    I have three Guzzis and a V8 powered Chevrolet Suburban.

    :evil
  16. Moronic

    Moronic Long timer

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    Unfortunately for those wanting a 65 per cent discount on this bike, the producers do not want it to sell like hotcakes.

    If it sold like hotcakes, they would have to build it like hotcakes. Which would mean investing enough money in plant, parts and people that they could cast, weld, screw together and ship 10 or more bikes a day instead of just one a day.

    Suddenly they have a lot more at stake and are selling bikes with cheap cycle parts that they would not want to own and ride themselves.

    Sure, IF all went well for long enough they could possibly rake in more money that way, eventually.

    But something tells me they are not doing it just for the money. :lol3
  17. Cakeeater

    Cakeeater Been here awhile

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    Good article. Pushrods sure seem to be having renewed respect in the automotive world. Five inches in height difference between a GM and an AMG V8? that's a lot. Sure makes it easier to have a lower hood on the Vette.

    I've got four GM v8s in my garage. Two cars, a suburban, a ski boat... Never a single problem with any of them. Couldn't be simpler to maintain. I wonder how much money it would cost to keep the valvetrain on an AMG v8 in spec over say, 150,000 miles? (Yeah, I know...i know...most of those are garage queens, but still). I know how much it's cost on my suburban: zero dollars.

    Judging engines by displacement has always been silly imho. It's generally for tax reasons. Who cares what the internal size of the cylinder is? What matters is the external size of the motor, and the fuel economy, power, etc. I saw another article that a Vette v8 had better power to weight compared to a Ferarri engine. Pushrods are light, compact, simple and durable as hell.

    Yes, you give up higher RPM, and a tad less torque for same CC compared to overhead cams etc. But If govt's taxed engines by external volume you'd see more of 'em on the road. That will never happen, of course.

    I've said it before and I'll say it again, I would LOVE to ride the Motus. That kind of torque (and HP) down low would be addicting on the street. I hope they make money and stay in business.

    Cakeeater
  18. Moronic

    Moronic Long timer

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    Good point and nicely stated.

    In the bike world, the other reason for the focus on displacement, of course, has been racing.

    Four-valve DOHC heads and six cylinders worked for Honda in the 60s because the point of the exercise was to get maximum propulsion out of 250cc. If he could have made the engine as big as he wanted, likely he'd have done something different.
  19. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Likely Lost.

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    The Japanese (and a lot of European) automakers got VERY good at small displacement because of tax reasons. Ever wonder why the 1.8 liter is so prevalent in Japanese cars? At 2.0L they are in a different tax bracket that makes them significantly more expensive.

    In the US we never really had that, so the classic "bigger is better" mentality always held sway. You still see it, how many premium models have +6.0 liter displacements?

    If GM is getting 30mpg from 6.3L great. I have bikes if I want a high revving barely steetable engine.
  20. Cakeeater

    Cakeeater Been here awhile

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    I'd argue in the US we had the mentality of Customer is King. In europe and japan, it has long been avoid the tax man.

    I've got a 6.2 liter v8 in a (Holden) Pontiac g8, manual trans. It's a big car, holds five adults, monster trunk. If I baby it on the interstate I can get 27 mpg. That's about the same as a five-passenger mid-size FWD 'crossover' with much smaller engine. However, my car is a blast to drive. Such a fantastic kick of power from idle to redline. (I rarely come close to spinning the engine fast...it's just not needed to really haul).

    I like high-revving engines too. But I like engines that produce more power at all RPMs. This motus is cool. the corvette endurance racers that used this engine would clean up against the competition.

    cakeeater