Moving to Auckland for 2 years

Discussion in 'New Zealand' started by shocker2000, Jan 21, 2014.

  1. shocker2000

    shocker2000 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2014
    Oddometer:
    35
    Hey everyone,

    So long story short I am getting transferred for work and as apart of that I get a moving allowance. Naturally like any responsible adult I will be using that allowance to ship my motorcycle (2005 Suzuki GSXR-600), purchased and ridden in Canada.

    I am not too concerned about the process of the move (there is a moving company that handles all of that). However, I am more concerned with passing inspection once it lands on the island. The bike is completely stock except for flush mounted lights (turn signals). Unfortunately the moving company is completely useless when it comes to information about passing inspection on the island, and I just had a few questions. Also I have owned the bike for years so taxes are a non-issue.

    1. Should I have any concerns about passing emission tests? Or sound tests?
    2. Different moving companies have told me different things 1 has said I need to ship the bike completely dry (except for a bit of guess so I can ride it home)... not sure how I do that with no fluids. Another has said I can ship it with all the fluids and ideally a small amount of gas in the tank.
    3. Will the flush mount lights pass inspection? I know here they would fail inspection, should I purchase some stock lights to put on in order to get past inspection?
    4. Is there anything else that I should be concerned about? I would hate to have my baby arrive only for her not to be allowed.

    Thanks for any pointers you all can give me much appreciated.

    Cheers
    #1
  2. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

    Joined:
    May 17, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,936
    Location:
    Rotoiti, North Is, New Zealand
    Hi Mate, check out the govt LTNZ website for the rules. IIRC you will have to get it vinned which requires an inspection that is a bit stricter than the normal yearly WOF. I would work out exactly where this inspection will be done - A VTNZ place somewhere in Auckland I would guess, then get in touch with them & ask about the specific requirements as I don't think the LTNZ site is too detailed. You will probably need to get a headlight that dips left at minimum.

    Cheers
    Clint
    #2
  3. Chasio

    Chasio n00b

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1
    Location:
    New Zealand
    I hope the company is also paying your accommodation. It's getting pretty pricey here these days...

    There are some useful links on importing in here: Adventure Riding NZ.
    #3
  4. Voltaire

    Voltaire Titanium and Ceramic Hipster

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2,057
    Location:
    Auckland,New Zealand
    Hi, you may need to have some ownership history as they are always keen here to clip the tax ticket of 15%.
    Make sure its spotlessly clean, under the guards etc as they will no doubt charge you to steam clean it again if not.
    I see US spec bikes for sale here with MPH speedos so can't be too hard to get on the road.
    Obvious one is headlight needs to dip left.
    I bought a used Ducati light from Italy as the dip was done by the reflector not the lens.
    Indicators I would not worry about until you get pinged on them.
    Question I'd ask is is really worth the effort?
    Bikes are pretty cheap here, registration is not, $500+
    Maybe buy an adventure type bike and go touring, its pretty small compared to Canada.
    cheers
    John
    #4
  5. shocker2000

    shocker2000 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2014
    Oddometer:
    35
    I am not too familiar with the NZ economy yet or avenues of buying or selling.
    My train of thought is it will be very hard to sell the bike here right now as it is winter, so no one can ride. I am not going to be able to use all of my moving allowance regardless, and I want to have a bike while over there. Seems to be the easiest to ship the bike and then sell it before I come back. Unless trademe is completely out of whack I should be able to turn a nice profit, as long as the costs to get it on the road are not to bad.
    #5
  6. Voltaire

    Voltaire Titanium and Ceramic Hipster

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2,057
    Location:
    Auckland,New Zealand
    Sounds like a plan. Here you can ride all year round.:D
    #6
  7. shocker2000

    shocker2000 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2014
    Oddometer:
    35
    I guess I should also ask are there any parts I should consider importing when I come over? I plan on bringing all my tools to do the regular work on the bike, how hard/expensive is it to get your hands on hardware on the island?
    #7
  8. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

    Joined:
    May 17, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,936
    Location:
    Rotoiti, North Is, New Zealand
    It's not too hard to get parts in NZ, but often there's a 3-5 week wait while stuff comes ex Japan, Europe etc. Like pretty much everything parts are expensive compared to USA prices (not sure on Canada) . Since you have a shipping allowance I would load up a couple of sets of tyres, chains, sprockets etc. http://www.partsmonster.co.nz/ is a good site to compare the retail price of OEM parts in NZ with what you're paying at home. http://www.cycletreads.co.nz/default.aspx is a good one to look up tyres, accessories etc.

    Cheers
    Clint
    #8
  9. kiwipeet

    kiwipeet Uber Cyber Loafer

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,046
    Location:
    Gizboooooring
    Mate... :lol3

    I know it's just a couple remote islands, but we don't live in the dark ages. Any typical tools you would want you can buy here. However, if you want a whole toolkit and/or quality stuff it will of course get very expensive very quickly. Soo.. If you already have tools you like, and your work is paying for your relocation expenses... then I'd suggest you bring your own.

    FYI if you want to know about tools and hardware stores we have 2 common automotive chains. (<cite class="vurls">www.supercheapauto.co.nz</cite> and <cite class="vurls">www.repco.co.nz</cite>) and we have several Building/DIY/hardware store chains ( Bunnings, Mitre10, Placemakers, Carters and the Tool shed.) and there are dozens of more specialised shops if you're wanting top spec tools.

    As for bringing thngs, the stuff thats hard to find in NZ and Aus is Bike specific parts. We often resort to buying things off the net from the US because they're fatsre than ordering thm in NZ or in many cases significnatly cheaper. I've even heard of groups buying in a pallet of tyres from the US because they were out of stock in Aussie. (ie, Dunlop 908 RR's). If you've got a container and are feeling generous or want to bake a few bucks you could post on here if anyone wants tanks/fairings etc bought in. (freight on large individual items can be a killer).

    Back to the bike. As part of the import process you will need to show when you purchased it and evidence of ownership. If you've owned it for more than 12 months there won't be any import duty/tax on it.

    I've bought in a couple of bikes. In my experience the process to get the bike on the road will cost you about $600-$1000. Assuming your bike meets the requirements. (i.e you've swapped the headlight.).

    After market exhausts shouldn't be a problem provided they're not obnoxiously noisy. But if you've got the originals it will just make life easier. The closer the bike is to standard the less hassles you will have.

    What else.. Oh yeah.. Insurance. Insurance in NZ is not a legal requirement. Thats right. You don't have to get it. However it's a smart idea. Assuming you have a clean license (they'll have no way of knowing otherwise) you should be able to insure ~10K bike for about $500-$700 a year for comprehensive insurance and $100-200 if you only want 3rd party. However as you don't have any history in NZ you'll probably be looking at a bit more... and.. Insurance companies love sports bikes. Anyways my advice to you is get a letter or statement from your current insurer if it shows that you have a long claim free history or a "no claims bonus". You might not need it, but in the past in other countries, that has meant i've started my insurance on the maximum no-claims bonus which has saved me 60% on my insurance.
    #9
  10. shocker2000

    shocker2000 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2014
    Oddometer:
    35
    Real noob question what exactly is required for the headlight? I want to get this swapped out before I leave. From reading the Registries website all they say is a good headlight that can be dipped. I believe this is the only thing I will need to swap out and would prefer to do that now while I still have a garage and full access to tools.

    Cheers
    #10
  11. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

    Joined:
    May 17, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,936
    Location:
    Rotoiti, North Is, New Zealand
    Many cars & bikes have headlights dip off to one side to suit which side of the road you ride on. (often they'll have an 'L' or 'R' on them) Checking the part numbers online for your GSXR headlight it looks like they are the same here & in the USA, so that shouldn't actually be a problem for you, point it at a wall & check though.

    Cheers
    Clint
    #11
  12. Voltaire

    Voltaire Titanium and Ceramic Hipster

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2,057
    Location:
    Auckland,New Zealand
    The headlight dip thing is pretty subjective, I have had 'discussions' with the Testing Station guys on my side of the Island :rofl and they made me change the lens. However I have two other bikes that have Euro lens's and no one has ever picked up on it.
    Personally I would not bother until they tell you to. I don't know about the latest headlights but my 99 Ducati had the dipping bit in the reflector.
    With Insurance documentation from your current insurer would be helpful.
    #12
  13. motu

    motu Loose Pre Unit

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2001
    Oddometer:
    4,913
    Location:
    New Zealand
    A motorcycle headlamp should dip straight down, cars dip to the side, or have a asymmetrical beam on dip. I have a 7'' sealed beam in the shed that has ''motorcycle'' on it - dips straight down. My bike has an H4 bulb with a horizontal cutoff for dip - real stupid thing to have on a bike. It's legal to have these car lamps, but not really what you need on a bike.
    #13
  14. shocker2000

    shocker2000 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2014
    Oddometer:
    35
    Thanks for all the feedback, much appreciated.

    One more question for all you fine gentlemen. The old lady is going to want to get a cage while we are there as well, approximately how much would we be looking at for monthly payments on a 2 year lease? We would be looking for pretty much the cheapest new car possible.

    Cheers
    #14
  15. Voltaire

    Voltaire Titanium and Ceramic Hipster

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2,057
    Location:
    Auckland,New Zealand
    #15
  16. kiwipeet

    kiwipeet Uber Cyber Loafer

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,046
    Location:
    Gizboooooring
    Maybe a better way to think of the headlight issue is that on low beam the light pattern should not be able to shine into the eyes of an oncoming motorist. If you shine your light on a garage door you will see the shape of the light pattern. If you wheel the bike backwards you should see the line drop.

    If the pattern shines upwards (and/or) to the right you will have problems getting a cert/wof in NZ.

    Some vehicles influence the beam pattern by the shape of the lens. Others have little metal shapes that act like shields. Like my ktm. Some lights even have coatings on the bulbs themselves.

    My ktm was actually UK (Left hand drive) model, but had euro pattern (right hand) lights. It passed certification (they didn't notice) but it failed on my next wof inspection. The lights are a sealed unit, but I managed to cut my light open and twist the housing enough to adjust the cut-off pattern just enough to squeak through.

    You can see the shape of my light pattern (once I fixed it) in this post here: http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=19171712&postcount=257

    From the centre of the pattern to the right it's flat. (Points at 3 o'clock). From the centre of the pattern to the left it slopes up. (Points at 10 o'clock). If your light does the opposite ie slopes up to 2 o'clock. You'll need to do something about it.

    I agree with Clint, check it before you get too worried.

    If you do need to replace your lens, you might find it easier to do in NZ. You can probably get one from a wrecker. Swapping a headlight shouldn't be a big deal. You can probably do it with the standard tool kit on your bike. If you got a bike shop to do it i'd expect it to take about an hour so $60-100.
    #16