MSF Recongnizes YCRS for instruction of Riders

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by ZiaThunder, Aug 8, 2014.

  1. ZiaThunder

    ZiaThunder Go big or go home

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    I love this: As a RiderCoach and as YCRS school graduate. This school did more for my riding then any other school that I've done.




    http://www.roadracingworld.com/news/msf-official-recognizes-yamaha-champions-riding-school/



    Yamaha Champions Riding School Receives Official Recognition from the Motorcycle Safety Foundation

    School Provides High-Performance Training to Motorcyclists on Actual Racetracks

    IRVINE, Calif., August 7, 2014 – The Motorcycle Safety Foundation today announced its recognition of the Yamaha Champions Riding School, making it only the second third-party curriculum to receive this distinction by the MSF. The YCRS is a descendant of the Freddie Spencer High Performance Riding School and is now led by Spencer’s protégés Nick Ienatsch (pronounced "eye-notch") and Ken Hill. The school has recently relocated to the New Jersey Motorsports Park in Millville, NJ.

    The Yamaha Champions Riding School earned the recognition by meeting MSF criteria to be considered a responsible system of coaching for motorcycle track riding, and by being actively involved with the MSF and aligned with its key principles. The MSF further recognized the school as complementary to the MSF philosophy and approach to motorcyclist training.

    According to Dr. Ray Ochs, MSF vice president of Training Systems, the recognition is the result of a longstanding relationship between the YCRS and the MSF. The recognition was conferred following a collaborative process that included a rigorous examination of the school’s approach to teaching by Dr. Ochs and other MSF staff, plus an extensive review of the overall course methodology and curriculum materials. More than 25 specific aspects of the program were evaluated during this process, including maintaining a high-challenge/low-threat environment, integrating safety with instructors' talking points, and the degree to which instructors evaluate and provide feedback to students during drills. This review culminated with Ienatsch agreeing to incorporate key MSF instructional concepts and terminology.

    The mission of YCRS is to promote safe and precise riding by teaching riders world-class racing techniques. Nick Ienatsch and the other instructors accomplish this goal through a mix of classroom and on-track instruction. YCRS provides a comprehensive curriculum that covers topics such as U-turns, trail braking, foot-peg loading, and blind corner entry. A variety of drills are employed to help students refine their skills, and discussions, on-track demonstrations, and on-track video recording reinforce important mental strategies. Although the curriculum is based on racing techniques, the skills and strategies presented and practiced include risk management, self-assessment, using better judgment, and identifying escape paths, and are therefore applicable to street riding. Riders of all skill levels can benefit from this course.

    About Nick Ienatsch

    With a successful professional racing career and eighteen years of motorcycle instructing, Nick Ienatsch is highly qualified to teach the YCRS. Ienatsch’s professional racing career includes two AMA SuperTeams national championships, four top-three annual finishes in AMA 250 GP competition, two #1 plates from Willow Springs, three WERA Grand National Championships, and top-three finishes in the AMA 600 SuperSport competition. Before becoming the lead coach at YCRS, Ienatsch spent many years teaching under Freddie Spencer at the High Performance Riding School. Thirty years as a motojournalist for Cycle World magazine and authoring the book Sport Riding Techniques have further enhanced Ienatsch’s credibility as a world-class motorcycle instructor.

    About the MSF

    The Motorcycle Safety Foundation® promotes safety through rider training and education, operator licensing tests and public information programs. The MSF works with the federal government, state agencies, the military and others to offer training for all skill levels so riders can enjoy a lifetime of safe, responsible motorcycling. Standards established by the MSF® have been recognized worldwide since 1973.

    The MSF is a not-for-profit organization sponsored by BMW, BRP, Ducati, Harley-Davidson, Honda, Kawasaki, KTM, Piaggio, Polaris Motorcycles, Suzuki, Triumph and Yamaha. For safety information or to enroll in the RiderCourse nearest you, visit msf-usa.org or call (800) 446-9227.
    #1
  2. SRG

    SRG SRG

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    So a group of amateurs officially recognizes a group of professionals?

    I hear the driving instructors at the local high schools are considering awarding members of the grand prix drivers association honorary degrees.

    :lol3
    #2
  3. dwoodward

    dwoodward Long timer

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    So the MSF now endorses Yamaha. I wonder how Kawasaki, Honda, Suzuki, etc. feel about that.







    :hide
    #3
  4. Jim Moore

    Jim Moore Long timer

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    I wouldn't mind a discount for ridercoaches.
    #4
  5. double_entendre

    double_entendre Ticking away the....

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    What differentiates an "actual" racetrack from non-actual ones?
    #5
  6. catweasel67

    catweasel67 RD04

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    Hehe, yeah, I was wondering that :p
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  7. JohnCW

    JohnCW Long timer

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    No, this can't be allowed to happen, they're all going to DIE. :cry Keith, Keith where are you, go tell these bozos that foot-peg loading does nothing .......
    #7
  8. Bill Harris

    Bill Harris Confirmed Curmudgeon

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    So what does a world-class motorcycle track riding school have to do with teaching noobs to ride safely so they can get their MC endorsement? Are we training Squids? How about Pirate school, or motorbike Dude school while we're at it?

    Sounds like Dr Ray of the MSF decided to do his buds at YCRS, a descendant of the Freddie Spencer High Performance Riding School, now led by Spencer’s protégés Nick Ienatsch (pronounced "eye-notch") and Ken Hill, which has recently relocated to the New Jersey Motorsports Park in Millville, NJ, a promo favor.

    MSF sold out. The shame... :cry

    :)

    --Bill
    #8
  9. JohnCW

    JohnCW Long timer

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    It's possible they may be professionals that know a lot about how to ride a motorcycle, have a lot of experience developing effective training programs, and are effective at communication these concepts to riders. No????
    #9
  10. rebobd

    rebobd rebobd

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    If you rely solely on MSF to teach you "next level" skills on a bike I think your just limiting what's possible. It's nothing even near a sellout to encourage all of us to continue our development as riders beyond the basics. Those are the skills we will all need to get out of danger and keep us in control. I'm a big YCRS fan, here's my story:

    http://youtu.be/kYpo11zr1mQ
    #10
  11. steve68steve

    steve68steve Long timer

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    What DOESN'T it have to do with it?

    This notion that there are "basic techniques" and "advanced techniques" is a bunch of moosh to me. "Save it for the track"?

    If a technique is used on the track to enable a rider to go FASTER, what that really means is that it's enabling them to carry that speed SAFER. Racing puts one at the limit of the envelope - which is something that should never be done on the street - but racers sure aren't getting around a track so quickly and finishing races by employing techniques which make the bike crash.
    If they were, every moto GP event would end at the first turn with a pile of bikes.

    I think my own personal ideas about what (ought to) constitute a MC endorsement are a little more stringent than the State's. Dumbing down the syllabus so inexperienced people who shouldn't be out there can get out there is a flawed premise. Designing training to accommodate that flawed premise is somewhere between irresponsible and unconscionable, IMHO. The State gets this one wrong.
    #11
  12. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    Shhhh, now you're just trying to throw logic into the mix. That's not how this place works. :lol3
    #12
  13. catweasel67

    catweasel67 RD04

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    Aren't you against training in general because it's "spoon feeding"? :evil
    #13
  14. ZiaThunder

    ZiaThunder Go big or go home

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    I was thrilled to see this. As a RiderCoach I know that what I've give 99% of those students, is just the basics of how to ride a moto. Hopefully, I've encouraged them to think about their riding and to CONTINUE their education.

    YCRS is another way to advance your skill set. It's not encouraging people to ride like idiots, it's about how to ride safer with less drama.
    #14