Musings on the Whooo-sa-berg FE570

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by CodeMonkee, Jun 7, 2009.

  1. (sp?)

    (sp?) flaming ahole ;)

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    where do I start?

    - lack of cush drive
    - lack of fuel range
    - lack of rear subframe (to hold any luggage)
    - lack of oil capacity
    - minimal dealer service network

    all of these can be solved, with the exception of the last one. even that one can be mitigated somewhat by the fact that the bike is 90% KTM.

    if you want to make it a 610, you'll have to add passenger footpegs. :lol3
    #61
  2. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

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    IMO, converting it that way would be defeating purpose of the bike - at least if you do what most people do - farkelize it, put racks and panniers on it, put street tires on it, etc.

    I bought the bike because it was a light weight dirt bike in the 400 to 600cc displacement range, with good suspension components and an engine/trans that works across a wide range of situations. Stock, it doesn't have anywhere that you can put a rear rack or a pannier rack on it. You would have to get something custom made - starting with a different subframe. You would also need to spend money on different gas tanks.

    Not that I am not going to try to have 'adventures' on it, but I am going to try to keep those off-road as much as possible. It is an expensive bike for a dirt bike and it seems (to me) like a waste to put more hours on it on the road than is necessary to get to a nearby off-road riding area. I am seriously thinking of buying something to haul it (and other stuff) to riding areas that are not nearby rather than ride it on the road. I could ride it on the road, but I would wear out the knobbies on pavement when I should be wearing them out on dirt - not to mention the engine.

    I may put a Giant Loop bag on it for extended back country trips. But other than that no bags, no GPS, no radar detector, no bluetooth intercom, no iPod, etc.

    If you keep to the spirit of the intended purpose of the bike, sure, you could have some great adventures on it.
    #62
  3. (sp?)

    (sp?) flaming ahole ;)

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    I was with you until the "no GPS" part. Having a GPS is critical for a machine of this caliber which has so little fuel range. Knowing which route to head down can easily mean the difference between walking and riding.

    (or getting out of the woods vs. spending the night)
    #63
  4. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

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    I may eventually get a GPS to put in a pack, but not to mount on the handlebars.

    I've gotten along for the last 40+ years of riding without one. I never get lost, I just temporarily misplace myself. :evil
    #64
  5. (sp?)

    (sp?) flaming ahole ;)

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    unlike compasses, having a GPS in the pack does one no good. it's equally as important to know where you've been (tracks) as it is to know where you are (waypoints). it's the blend of waypoints and tracks that allows a GPS to do its magic. getting lost and then turning on your GPS is the equivalent of screaming "I'm here at the top of your lungs". It won't help much when you need it most.

    think of it as a survival tool. every time you head into the woods ask yourself: 'am I prepared to spend the night here?' if not, take steps to eliminate that possibility. I'm an amateur radio operator (ham) and often bring a handheld transceiver programmed with local repeater frequencies. if something turns to shit, I (or someone) can get to a location where help can be contacted. having accurate GPS coordinates is really important here.
    #65
  6. PowerT

    PowerT Long timer

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    Exactly and I would add once you get this tool learn to utilize all the functions necessary to maximize it's capacity for your needs.
    #66
  7. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

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    I am going to get a SPOT.

    Just because the GPS is a pack doesn't mean it can't track where I have been. But on the Husaberg I am not going to mount it (at least that is what I am thinking at this point in time). Like I've said - I've been out in the woods many times, on foot and in vehicles. I eventually get myself out. Not always the way I planned, but that is half the fun - to me at least.
    #67
  8. (sp?)

    (sp?) flaming ahole ;)

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    RTFM :nod
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  9. (sp?)

    (sp?) flaming ahole ;)

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    SPOT is a decent layman's tool. it's a bit expensive and rudimentary for my liking. it does serve a need and I can see why it sells. when I want to be tracked, I use APRS on my 2M radio, e.g. http://www.findu.com/cgi-bin/find.cgi?call=k4hg-8&terra=4

    once you have a license and own the equipment, it's free.

    GPS work inside a backpack? maybe.

    GPS depends on line of site to the satellite. in northern latitudes (like ours) it is often difficult to get a lock. this problem is exacerbated by tree canopies and mountainous terrain. in other words, your GPS is challenged to get reception on a good day in the PNW. why compound the problem by hiding its antenna inside a backpack?
    #69
  10. V8R

    V8R Been here awhile

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    no sure what model you use, but i run around the bush with my gps in my pack, recording track, just fine. start it recording when i go in, chuck it in my camelback and pretty much forget about it until i get suitably lost :) pull it out and reference where ive come from and make my way back.. im only using garmin software on a nokia phone, known to not be the most sensitive reciever out there..
    #70
  11. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

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    The main purpose for me is peace of mind for my daughter and my mom so they don't worry when I am riding, especially on a trip alone. For that purpose, except for the imperfect TX, it should work well.

    You can get external puck antennas and for most backpack material it should be virtually transparent. The main thing about forest cover, especially on wet days, is the moisture content and the tree branches/trunks. Backpack material should have no measurable effect on reception. We'll see.
    #71
  12. (sp?)

    (sp?) flaming ahole ;)

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    New South Wales is just slightly south of there, isn't it? :lol3 I've not been there but I'm guessing it's quite a bit less mountainous and quite a bit less forested than the Pacific Northwest. IOW, you missed the point entirely.

    As far as sensitivity, your Nokia (and most current handhelds) would likely have the SIRF III chipset inside - one of the more sensitive GPS receivers around. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SiRFstar_III)

    Think for a moment why your cellphone has GPS - it's for the authorities to find you in case of emergencies. Having a GPS receiver that can get a position from inside a building is key. Having cell coverage that also can get inside the building makes the system work. There's no cell coverage most places I ride. Compared to rest-of-world, the US is a wasteland when it comes to cellular coverage.
    #72
  13. Powder Muncher

    Powder Muncher Adventurer

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    Gps works fine through my Aircraft window 1/8" Plexiglas a backpack will not be a issue.
    Just a cheap small Garmin GPS is all one needs .
    Stick it on the bike and forget it in the dirt put it in a zip lock bag or if you have it on the mount put the bag over it and zip tie it to keep the dust and water/mud of it.
    #73
  14. datol

    datol n00b and improved!

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    My riding buddy and I used a Mercedes 300D for trailering for a few years, it was awesome, nice AC, comfortable, quiet, and nothing like showing up for a race all refreshed instead of beat to death by the pick-up you drove over night to get there.

    We built a small receiver hitch for it, but now you can buy some small ones for cars.

    http://shopping.yahoo.com/s:Trailers%20&%20Winches:4168-Brand=BMW

    The other key is a light trailer.

    http://www.discount-trailers.com/motorcycle_trailers.htm

    Very cool bike, good luck

    Dane
    #74
  15. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

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    Thanks, but I've talked to quite a few people about this and they just don't work well - in part because there is no frame, you wind up ruining the underbody and if nothing else you get rust and leaks from drilling holes in the car - not to mention seriously degrading the value of the car. Look around and see how many late model 3 series Bimmers (not an X3) you see running around with a trailer hitch. I have seen none, nada, zip.

    I want to haul both bikes - which means at least 750 pounds of weight, not to mention that of the trailer. I also want to haul back in to places I would never drive my car, with or without a trailer. So a truck it is.
    #75
  16. (sp?)

    (sp?) flaming ahole ;)

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    or an SUV.

    I hauled 3 bikes to Winthrop last weekend on a trailer pulled by our Mercedes ML500. Surprisingly I averaged over 16 mpg for the trip. The trailer I have is aluminum and weighs just over 300 pounds. With the 3 bikes, the total load was about 1100 pounds.

    I have an older Ford Ranger (2.9 L, V6) that I could have hauled two bikes with. It would have acheived the same mileage but without air conditioning and the creature comforts that the benz provided.

    I've thought about getting an Ultimate MX Hauler for those times when I'd only carry a single bike. http://ultimatemxhauler.com/index.php
    #76
  17. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

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    Almost all of the time it is just me, myself and I in/on my vehicles (I am divorced and my daughter has long since grown up and on her own), so passenger space is usually wasted and I want maximum hauling space instead without a trailer. I've hauled trailers of almost every kind before (except large RV types), and they have their own hassles to be considered. I will probably eventually get one, but right now I want just the truck.

    I was considering a super/extra cab with a short bed (to keep the wheelbase standard), but then thought about it and decided on a standard cab because that would mean the bikes would fully fit in the bed (length of 7 feet v. 6, 6.5 or 8 ft. bed). By getting a tall enough canopy and a long bed, the bikes can be inside out of sight when I stay at a hotel/motel/etc. overnight. Out of sight means out of mind for thieves and people who would just mess with them out of spite.

    I am thinking there will be times when I want to camp over night too and again having the longer bed (with the standard wheelbase) is advantageous.
    #77
  18. (sp?)

    (sp?) flaming ahole ;)

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    good luck on that. years ago when I did an exhaustive search, I couldn't find a canopy tall enough to take my bicycles standing up.

    this solution has van written all over it. my friend Sam used to haul his 'berg around in a Euro Van. I'd often stuff my KTM inside also and we'd travel up to Walker Valley.

    There are other vans but I'd doubt there are too many canopies which could accomodate a tall bike like the FE570.

    good luck on your search, do report back!
    #78
  19. CodeMonkee

    CodeMonkee Geek Adventurer

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    There are a lot of canopies that are tall, but they are out there. Basically you have to go with canopies/shells/whatever, that are meant for commercial trucks:

    http://www.4are.com/product/commercial.php

    So far, I have found about three candidates.

    I am actually having more trouble find a standard cab truck - almost all for sale are super/extra/quad cabs.
    #79
  20. Ray R

    Ray R Been here awhile

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    Have you looked at a Sprinter Van? Great fuel economy, TONS of room for you, your bikes, your stuff, etc. Heck...you could sleep in the back of the thing if you wanted to. And with the tall roofline model, you could stand up in it. Loading is easier. Lots of plusses there.
    #80