My embarrassment never ends

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Ray of Sunshine, Jun 9, 2012.

  1. Ray of Sunshine

    Ray of Sunshine Meat Donut 2 Some

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    A few years back, I posted a message about going around an off ramp faster in my VW Golf than I did on my VFR. This was back when I was riding most of the time, so I had some skills.

    Recently, nostalgia got the better of me and I started riding again. Fortunately, a VFR requires a simple fluids check, a time on the Battery Tender and a push of the button.
    I came to the same off ramp, and ten pennied my way around it. Not a nice, smooth arc, but I did beet my beast time in the VW. I almost caught the guy ahead of me, too, until he pulled away. That damn FIAT 500. :baldy
    #1
  2. Forty Years Ago

    Forty Years Ago I'm not an alcoholic.

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    I glad you "ten pennied" around it and "beet your beast time". Apparently, your time away from riding was not spent in
    English class. :lol3
    #2
  3. KG6BWS

    KG6BWS Been here awhile

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    :lol3:lol3:lol3
    #3
  4. kraven

    kraven Hegelian Scum

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    Wow. Your embarrassment really doesn't end.

    You can drop your VFR at my house here in Western NC and I'll give it a proper ride. Leave money for gas, tires, and oil. :clap
    #4
  5. ph0rk

    ph0rk Doesn't Care

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    Was it an abarth fiat 500?

    I wouldn't feel that embarrassed about that, they can corner at .87 G's with stock tires.
    #5
  6. IheartmyNx

    IheartmyNx Ihave2draft

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    Is that supposed to be a high number???

    Cuz it's not...



    Maybe the VFR isnt quite the handler... Doesn't it weigh the same as the 500? Half the wheels half the brakes and 10% the contact patch is hardly fair. :lol3
    #6
  7. Dorzok

    Dorzok Long timer

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    :rofl
    i'm still trying to figure out what "ten pennied" was supposed to mean.
    #7
  8. Dcc46

    Dcc46 Been here awhile

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    :lurk
    #8
  9. rivercreep

    rivercreep Banned

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    ...someone who demands perfection from others, should first seek it in himself.:rofl

    I'm not too proud to admit, I'm not perfect and have very bad grammar/spelling. (it's a rare exception such as this that I point out anothers mistake, for obvious reasons):evil
    #9
  10. ibafran

    ibafran villagidiot

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    ALL: They don't take bikes to the skid pad for G numbers like they generate for the cages. Recently, Cycle World posted something like 0.82g for the BMW 1600. The Can-Am Spyder generates 0.53g before the electronic safety crap kicks in and stops the fun before it can get started. In the distant past, Cycle World has timed a very good rider on a stretch of secret road (Mexico?) against what was described as a cage enthusiast with mediocre skills. It was noted that there was a lot of wind blown sand in the corners on the test roadway. Results posted in the mag were that it took one very skilled rider to go fast and deal with the sand without crashing to barely beat the cager. It was noted that the cager has a much easier time 'recovering' from small driving errors with less consequence for errors than the bike (duh, added by me). Whereas, the biker very much needs to be skilled at the edge of traction while knowing that dropping the bike means loss of contest.

    From the above scenario, we can conclude that most cagers do not care to run at higher g-loads as it spills their coffees and makes for an uncomfortable ride what with complaints from passengers and barfing little kids. So it doesn't surprise me that the occasional solo cager might easily take an x-way ramp at a safe for a cage high g-load and stay out in front of a very good bike which is approaching its limits while being ridden by someone who is not on his game at the moment for a long list of reasons.

    Before the performance jockeys go nuts with this post and start telling me that the bike line on a ramp is much faster than a cage line, etc and that the bike should be faster, on and on; I remind them that the OP notes that he is sharing the ramp with the cage. Rolling on the bike's power for an easy pass on the ramp's exit line is do-able only if the rider wants to risk sharing a lane with an unknown cager who may merge early or do something unexpected in a risky place. So bikes are usually somewhat faster than the cages in most conditions due to other reasons but not because bikes pull better Gees by design. Most piss-poor cages can pull better g than most hot bikes on sticky DOT rubber. Good luck trying to stay with a Vette pulling 0.90g out 1.0g possible on a ramp. The Vette's tires won't even be moaning.

    And let us remember that itty-bitty, 2 seater sports cages of old used to come with very good bucket seats to allow for more comfortable support during high lateral g. And the cagers of old used to put good after-market driving seats in cages all the time when they wanted to have fun behind the wheel. As bikers, we should count our blessings that the cagers by and large do not have good lateral support. That kind of seating support would only encourage the cagers to drive poorly at a higher speed. Fortunately, most cagers do not know how to use their belts to get more lateral support. So, they rermain slow enough that it is still easy for bikers to deal with them.

    Thinking how I do, I am not embarassed that the occasional cager gets around a ramp better than me. And when it happens, I am grateful that the cager was moving fast enough to stay out of my way while I enjoyed my lean angle as I can on the day.

    And to the clowns who have nothing better to do than complain about enthusiastic forum users' english skills, fyyff; get some perspective. ibafran-not putting up with the usual forum crap today for who knows what reasons?
    #10
  11. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Flamed out

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    Hypothetically speaking, would it be embarrassing to have your buddy driving a Ford van catch you on a very tight and technical but excellently paved mountain road? What if, remember this is hypothetically speaking, you were riding on knobbies with maybe 15 psi? :lol3
    #11
  12. mrbreeze

    mrbreeze I keep blowing down the road

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    While you were away it went to 15 pennies due to inflation.

    I don't know about an Abarth, but if I get a Subaru WRX on my tail on a twisty road, I let him go by... :cry

    I had an RX-7 when I was in college, and I thought of it as a 4 wheeled motorcycle. It was an absolute blast!
    #12
  13. MotorradMike

    MotorradMike MIL-TFD-41

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    I think he meant "50 penced".
    A 50 pence British coin is not round but has 7 sides.
    If you "50 pence" a corner, you are changing line several times on the way through.
    #13
  14. TrashCan

    TrashCan Scary Jerry

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    [​IMG]

    :D:1drink
    #14
  15. Pappy541

    Pappy541 Been here awhile

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    Not sure how you calculate your time on the off ramp. Maybe if you concentrated on riding and not pushing some timer or watching a clock you could do a little better.
    #15
  16. atomicalex

    atomicalex silly aluminum boxes

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    Read ibafran's post. It covers it all. And yes, if you are running 15psi on knobbies, an Econoline with a good driver and a CG-Lock could outrun you in the curves.
    #16
  17. lethe

    lethe Long timer

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    Also, cars are typically more forgiving when they break traction in the corner.
    I've never timed myself on particular stretches of twisty road around here, but I'm sure I would tend to be more likely to push my Golf faster in some corners although the bikes would destroy it in between the corners. If I were feeling really "on" that day, it might be possible to push the bikes through the corner faster but no matter what it's sure a hell of a lot easier in a car.
    #17
  18. Forty Years Ago

    Forty Years Ago I'm not an alcoholic.

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    Mea culpa. Mea maxima culpa.
    #18
  19. rivercreep

    rivercreep Banned

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    I always just blame it on my ancient keyboard or not enough coffee.:D

    F.W.I.W. Back in 93 I had a Suzuki Swift GT that weighed next to nothing, made 100 H.P. and had sticky tires with a 49/51 weight ration...but what a little screamer it was through the turns. Very easy to outdo anything I could do on a bike on any tight twisty road, in that car. (magazines called it "The killer Flea")
    I can't even begin to tell you guys how much fun 4-wheel drifting was in that car and it was great fun embarrassing all of the muscle cars of that era. (until the road straightened out)
    #19
  20. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    Small, lightweight cars with moderate power are HUGE fun. Hence the Miata I've owned for over seven years. There is no doubt I drive that car through the twisties considerably faster than I ride either of my motorcycles through 'em. Better safety cage (literally), four tires on the ground and a very low CG all contribute to that.
    #20