My free SL350!

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by Mr. Vintage, May 2, 2007.

  1. brockster

    brockster Despair & Repair Garage

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2004
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    2,042
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    Near Dayton, Ohio USA
    I'm going to have to learn to weld. Then I can drag home (car) body parts that I see along the shoulder.

    Not exactly running with the bulls, is it?
    #81
  2. Mr. Vintage

    Mr. Vintage Family Dude

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    867
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    The Palouse
    So I had a friend over last night to help me muscle the engine in, but it was not to be. Recall that this bike has a shade over 6k miles on it, and I just changed the oil and cleaned the filter. When I drained the oil during disassembly I thought the oil looked a bit funky, but I wrote it off to flushing out the bike after some years of neglect. My last task before engine install was to replace the seals, and the first seal I removed had a bunch of shiny metal in the oil trapped behind. Crap. So I pulled the oil filter again, and after only 50 or so miles, it's half full of aluminum. It's hard to get a good picture, but the snot on this rag is what came out of the filter.
    [​IMG]
    Note the glitter on my hand - it looks like metallic paint.
    [​IMG]
    I then pulled the right side cover to check the sump, and find similar shiny oil along with big chunks of timing chain roller rubber. Arg. Off comes the top end and I find this:
    [​IMG]
    Note the big groove worn by the chain - it's that way on both sides. The roller is so out of whack that during my tune up, it may have actually loosened the chain rather than tightened it, depending on where it was sitting (it isn't round). Interestingly I have two basket 350 engines, both with nearly identical grooves worn from a flappin' and slappin' chain. So this isn't a problem specific to this engine.

    On the up side, the wacky centrifugal oil filter was doing its job and none of the top end (where the cam rides in journal bearings) showed any signs of wear or the shiny stuff. The cylinders look great - there's some slight staining from water/rust in the left cylinder, but no noticable wear. Everything else looks brand new. I'm going to split the case and clean everything, and order a new chain tensioner. One step forward...
    #82
  3. Mr. Vintage

    Mr. Vintage Family Dude

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    I went to the local Honda dealer today at lunch and ordered a new guide (the wheel above is the guide, not the tensioner as I had thought) and they had a new timing chain in stock ($84!). I talked to Russ the service guy, who's been working on Hondas for as long as I've been alive. He stated that as long as the proper service interval for chain tension is followed, these things will last forever. But since no one ever bothered with them, the chain get slack and begin to flap around, destroying the chain, guides, and the insides between the bore. Makes sense. What's another hundred bucks? :umph Luckily a gasket set came with the bike, so this could be worse. Maybe the loose chain made for retarted cam timing and the lousy off-idle power in the thing before...
    #83
  4. kta

    kta Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2007
    Oddometer:
    594
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    Antigua, Guatemala
    This thing is looking awesome. :lurk

    Congrats on the cool project. I never see too many of these SL350s around. Lots of CB and CL's are available, but the SL's are harder to come by. Does anyone know approximately how many of each model were produced and sold? I'd love to get my hands on a vintage dual-sport like this. I'm glad you're doing it justice Jeff!
    #84
  5. leewildwater

    leewildwater rrrrRide Man rrrrRide

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2004
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    out riding my two legged horse near Bryson City NC
    great project!!!!!!! big thumbs up. please keep posting.
    #85
  6. Stagehand

    Stagehand Imperfectionist

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    Shawangunks

    would make sense about the timing. was the mark all over the place?
    #86
  7. Mr. Vintage

    Mr. Vintage Family Dude

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    I never did anything other than static timing on it, but my guess is yes...

    I decided that it's stupid not to put a set of rings in the thing while I'm in there too, so I have those coming. The very slightly rusty cylinder tested a bit low on compression before, so now is the time. I'll do a real light hone. This thing will be brand new by the time I'm done with it!
    #87
  8. EvilClown

    EvilClown Reality show stunt double Super Moderator

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    They always are. They always are...:deal



    :lol3

    Keep posting!:clap
    #88
  9. Mr. Vintage

    Mr. Vintage Family Dude

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    867
    Location:
    The Palouse
    I got some shop time last night, and finished splitting the case halves - check out the sump:
    [​IMG]
    I think it's a good thing I decided to clean it out. Not a lot of evidence of routine oil changes either.... I suppose this is progress:
    [​IMG]
    #89
  10. Stagehand

    Stagehand Imperfectionist

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    every step further away is really one step closer to the end.

    Good job, love the pics.

    Sympathize :deal :lol3


    Oh, yeah, any idea what the slurry is from? anything in particular coming apart> or just neglect?
    #90
  11. Mini Trail

    Mini Trail n°°b

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    Be sure to hone those cylinders if you are putting in new rings. They won't seat if you don't.
    #91
  12. Mr. Vintage

    Mr. Vintage Family Dude

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    Today's main course is a pleasant medley of oil sludge and aluminum, with rubber morsels of cam chain guide. I think the cam chain has been shredding the motor's insides for a long time, and no one bothered to change the oil and notice the problem. If you only change oil every 3000 miles, this bike might have been changed once or twice??

    Definately, I'll give it a quick once over just to take the glaze off, maybe try and get rid of the tiny rust spots in the one cylinder if it doesn't take to much.
    #92
  13. Stagehand

    Stagehand Imperfectionist

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    what a way to wad it.
    #93
  14. Mr. Vintage

    Mr. Vintage Family Dude

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    This picture sucks, but this is the new (left) and old (right) timing chain side by side and lined up at the other end. The old one is stretched about a half a link - that couldn't have helped the cam timing.
    [​IMG]
    I cleaned all the ooze out of the sump - no signs of frequent oil changes there. See the 5 studs, two of which are threaded? These hold a sheet metal baffle between the crank and the sump, with two machine screws and three peened nipples (I just got a little excited writing that). Honda must not have figured on this coming out very often, but I re-peened the nipples and I think it'll be fine. I almost drilled and tapped the other three.
    [​IMG]
    Monkey poop (Indian Head shellac-based goo) applied just before mating the case halves.
    [​IMG]
    I forgot to take a picture after this, as I was too busy discovering that my side cover gaskets are the wrong ones, and trying to stop the bleeding after jamming a razor blade into my thumb scraping off gasket material. :hack
    #94
  15. Mr. Vintage

    Mr. Vintage Family Dude

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    I haven't posted much lately, but I have been working on the bike. I have the wiring pretty well in order, and have attached most everything that can be without the engine in. I threw the panniers on too:
    [​IMG]
    The engine is in one bigger piece rather than many smaller ones:
    [​IMG]
    And I started to resurrect the gas tank. Why kreem sucks:
    [​IMG]
    Besides the nuts I used to break it loose, that is all kreem chunks colored with rust. Maybe kreem works if you clean the tank and apply it right, but this is a mess. I'm going to go the electrolysis route to clean this up...
    #95
  16. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    I've had such lousy luck with Kreem and the mess it makes, I've just resorted to getting the tank as rust-free as I can and installing an inline fuel filter. Change it out every 2K or so and live with the rust problem.

    Also, on that cam chain tensioner problem, I've rebuilt a couple 350's and a common problem is that some ham-fisted mechanic installed the tensioner rubber upside down. It works for awhile and then the chain wears through the rubber and you're off to the races.

    - Mark
    #96
  17. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

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    Delaware Ohio
    You can try a radiator and fuel tank repair shop. One near where I used to live would clean the inside and coat it with RedKote a hard shell coating. They didn't guarantee they wouldn't damage paint, but if you're doing paint no biggie. The stuff works great and the cost may be just a bit more than a Kreem kit (which does suck) or a POR15 kit (which uses a similar hard shell coating).
    #97
  18. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

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    I had a 1970 version with the 19" front wheel and the crank with the throws 180° apart, which gave a bit more low end due to staggered firing order. It was a fun ride, would be neat to have now. I like your project - especially being a freebie to start.
    #98
  19. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    Yes, I had a radiator shop near me do a fuel tank one-time and it seemed like a pretty good job overall, although it wasn't cheap and, of course, the paint on the tank is toast. I didn't keep the bike long enough to know if it was going to be a good solution long-term.

    I think overall the Kreem and POR treatments are just too variable to be worth the trouble - it's just too hard to get down to bare metal so you're usually end up coating the rust and that lasts a season or two at best and then you've got a worse mess than what you started with.

    - Mark
    #99
  20. rthuey

    rthuey twist your wrist!!!

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    insanity is not as easy as i make it look

    Did you lose em' or forget about em' ??? "The PO had planned to rebuild the thing (not sure why - compression is good) so it also came with pistons, rings, gaskets, and a basket CB350 engine!"

    sigh ... the joys of a garage. :cry quit whining about the temperature in there, put another jacket on. :D