My problem: Triumph Scrambler vs. Suzuki V-Strom

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by CharlesRC, Oct 6, 2007.

  1. CharlesRC

    CharlesRC Adventurer

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    I don't have a bike right now, and am shopping. My problem is that I think I've fallen in love with the Triumph Scrambler. However, my practical side tells me that objectively the Suzuki V-Strom (650 or 1000) is both the far better value and a far better bike.

    All prices are quoted for new bikes OTD (out the door) from ads in the the Los Angeles / Las Vegas Cycle Trader or the Cycle Trader website.

    Triumph Scrambler
    2006 OTD $ 7,999
    2007 OTD $ 8,999
    Engine: 865 cc
    Transmission: 5 speed
    Twin carburettors
    Dry Weight: 451lbs
    Fuel capacity: 4.4 gal.
    Single disk brake in front.
    Seat height: 32.5in
    Height: 47.3in

    Suzuki V-Strom 650
    2007 OTD $ 6,299
    Engine: 650 cc
    Transmission: 6 speed
    EFI
    Dry Weight: 427 lbs
    Fuel capacity: 5.8 gal.
    Dual disk disk brake in front.
    Seat height: 32.3 in
    Height: 54.7 in

    Suzuki V-Strom 1000
    2006 OTD $ 7,899
    2007 OTD $ 7,999
    Engine: 1000 cc
    Transmission: 6 speed
    EFI
    Dry Weight: 462 lbs. (CA. model)
    Fuel capacity: 5.8 gal.
    Dual disk disk brake in front.
    Seat height: 33.1 in.
    Height: 54.9 in

    Other than the Scrambler being (to my eyes) the far more beautiful bike, am I missing something? Would a passenger be more comfortable on the Scrambler? Does the fact that the height of a Scrambler is 7 in. less than that of the V-Strom make it appreciably easier to handle? (I'm 6'3" and 210 lbs.)

    Reading the above, I feel almost compelled to get a V-Strom. (I don't want to be a hoser who buys an over-priced, inferior bike soley because of its looks. Um, do I? :huh)

    Also, is it true that Suzuki is dropping the V-Strom for 2008? If so, what would the mean re: parts availability, service, etc.?

    Also, I posted the following questions on the separate Scrambler thread and have received one helpful reply in PM, but guess it would do no harm to repost them here:

    I was looking for racks for both sides of a Scrambler. Can you tell me who makes these racks, and where you got them?

    I wouldn't want bags over the pipes all of the time, most of the time, or even very often. I just think it would be nice to have the capability for a long trip. So I guess the next questions are:

    1) Are the racks somewhat "quick release?" I don't mind a bit of wrenching. I'd just hate to have to remove, say, the exhaust system in order to remove the racks. :)

    2) Can you remove the rack on the right, pipe side, while retaining the rack on the left side? If I'm not going on a long trip, I'd like to see the pipes without the rack or the bag on the right side.

    3) If you can remove the rack on the right, pipe side, while retaining the rack on the left side, can you do it "quick release?"

    Not, of course, that I have a Scambler yet. I don't have a bike right now :(, and am in the process of shopping. I have to say I've fallen in love with the Scrambler, but the luggage is issue is one of my concerns.
    #1
  2. NateLePain

    NateLePain Long timer

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    Well, let me be one of the first to chime in and say that you are on your own... :lol3

    Seriously, you have come to the right place for reviews and so forth. In the last 18 months I have put 15K miles on an '06 BMW F650GSA and wouldn't trade it for either of the bikes you mentioned. I have ridden the scrambler (who's pipes were very well taped) and the heat off the exhaust was awful, especially in stop-n-go traffic. Lots of folks love the Strom but you might consider the Triumph Tiger, KW Versys or a F650GS, if you can find one.

    Ps. Don't forget a Motorcycle Safety Course, if you haven't taken one yet. :clap
    #2
  3. BikePilot

    BikePilot Long timer

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    Get what makes you smile, I tried the practical bike thing ones, it lasted about 28 hours (honda PC800, worst 2-wheeled experience of my life), I went right back to my TL1000S (fast, raw, uncomfortable, thundering twin) and smiled:D

    I'm pretty sure suzuki won't drop the wee and most likely won't drop the vee, even if they drop both parts will still be available for many, many years to come so no worries there:)

    The suzuki's are more modern bikes and probably the best dollar/utility ratio of any bike made. The Kawak Verseys is also up there and should be quite a bit more fun on the street. I tried to convince myself a wee would be the bike for me but just couldn't get excited over it. I'd love a scrambler, they are uber cool but its a bit out of my price range and not quite practical enough for me at the moment. If I were buying another street bike I'd probably go with a Versyes - really practical but still has a bit of a sporting side - that or a big sumo (which is what I really want).

    Eventually I'll have a scrambler and something like a highland SM950/duc hm sorta thing and who knows what else, but I gotta finish school and get a job first.
    #3
  4. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod I want to do right, but not right now

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    No, it's not true.


    Otherwise, get what moves you.
    #4
  5. kluts

    kluts The Lost Tourguide

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    These bikes are so different. Not like a, say, "I'm looking at a ULY vs. GS" thread.

    Scrambler really is in name only. Not too many riders will do dirt on them and I suppose you aren't looking for DS (dirt-street) rides. The pipes are a concern to me. They are just something to contend with, but why contend? Why not just a bonnie. Or a Thruxton (drool).

    As for the Strom it will still be a strong bike even if they discontinue. I rather think for 2008 there will be a replacement for this sort of bike, maybe it will avoid the ugly stick.

    At 6-3 and 210 you are well suited to the Strom and if you decide to go pillion it is the better passenger choice. On the Scrambler you'd certainly be taking up more space which your pillion would have wished for. On the Strom she'd fall asleep in comfort if you have a backrest.
    #5
  6. BikePilot

    BikePilot Long timer

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    The pipe thing is easy enough to solve and I suspect it will do as well or better off road as most any "adv" style bike (and probably quite a bit better than a strom, versy, uly etc)
    [​IMG]
    #6
  7. CharlesRC

    CharlesRC Adventurer

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    More complications. :D

    Triumph Tiger is a bit pricey for me. I don't believe the Versys is available in California because of our tighter air-pollution laws.

    I've looked seriously at the F560GS. It is in the right price range and looks like a great bike. I'm a bit leery of it being a one lunger. All of my background is street riding. Because I've recently moved to a more rural area, and like a lot of people here, I'm looking for something that will handle dirt and gravel roads, fire roads, etc., but not real off-road, trail bustng stuff. Most of my riding will still be highway and street. I'm probably going to be a 70/30 or 80/20 guy.
    #7
  8. BikePilot

    BikePilot Long timer

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    Any bike will do dirt and gravel roads if it needs to. I road my sport bike on some pretty bad dirt roads without issue. Its not as good at it as a bike made for such things, but it will easly go anywhere most cages will go:)

    I used to be very focused on specs and performance/utility/dollar ratio and have since become decidely less so oriented. I've found that most any bike will get you whever your going, might as well ride something that turns you on and makes it the most fun:clap

    here's another stolen scrambler pic;) Its an awsome looking bike imho, makes me wish I were old enough to remember it the first time around. As it is, I'd feel slightly weird riding a retro bike that harkens back to a period long before I was alive:)


    [​IMG]
    #8
  9. CharlesRC

    CharlesRC Adventurer

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    Could you or someone else elaborate? This is the first time I've seen someone say that a Scrambler would do as well, or better, off road than a strom, versys or uly. I have to admit, the strom looks a bit high and top heavy to me....
    #9
  10. acejones

    acejones Long timer

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    You've got to get the bike that lights your fire. If you don't you will always regret it. I still miss my Triumph Thunderbird Sport. I only sold it because size and powerwise it was so much like my R1150R and I couldn't rationalize having two similiar bikes. My wife told me not to sell it because even she liked it, and she doesn't ride. Get the one that sings to you.
    #10
  11. mudbogdad

    mudbogdad Been here awhile

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  12. kevrider

    kevrider Been here awhile

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    i agree with everyone else who says get what moves you. get the bike that makes you smile when you peep into the garage to see if it's still there. you will not regret it.

    you can spend a week in this thread, but at least read the first post and watch the video:
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=141616

    fwiw, i've ridden my VFR and my Hawk on quite a few dirt and gravel roads. i don't go in search of dirt with these bikes and will not go exploring on unpaved roads. but when it's just dirt and gravel, not mud and boulders, they get me to where i'm going just fine. the Scrambler will certainly be better offroad than those two.
    #12
  13. Big_John

    Big_John Ridin 4 the King

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    Go for the Strom!
    #13
  14. boxermoose

    boxermoose Now fully goosed

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    Last week you could get the scrambler for $7,200.00 with noproblem

    This week, now that the '08 specs have been published, I'll bet you could haggle to $7,000.00
    #14
  15. scorch

    scorch Poser

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    Scrambler is a cool bike. Vstrom... not cool at all.

    I could care less about how practical a bike is, the scrambler is cool. And it just needs a cool rider.

    Did I mention the scrambler is cool.

    :D

    Bikes aren't meant to be boring. Ride what makes you FEEL good. To me it would be the scrambler. I can see myself waking up at night to go to the garage to look at the scrambler.
    #15
  16. leftfield123

    leftfield123 leftfield123

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    I've had a wee for two years now and am still looking for some reason to move up to a GS1200. So far I haven't found one. The wee is easy to ride, has tremendous versitility and bullet proof. I have a Givi top case and with it, my wife says it's the most comfortable bike she's been on. I commute each day on it and have taken it on a 2K trip and never found it wanting. So, as mentioned above, it may be the best bang for the buck on the market.:evil
    #16
  17. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    I think you've already done a pretty good job of defining the ying/yang of the choice. The Scrambler is the "cool" bike and the Strom is the more practical choice. Only you can decide where you stand on the coolness vs. practicality scale. It's a little like who you marry - you want the looker or do you want someone who's nice and knows how to cook?

    Is there another bike that doesn't have such strong compromises? If you've got the wallet, GS's are pretty cool and very practical. Or how about the new Tiger? Or does the Versys not look so dorky to you?

    - Mark
    #17
  18. mleem1

    mleem1 n00b

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    I went with the V-Strom a couple months ago and am very happy with the bike. I have put on 5,000 miles in just about 2 1/2 months. Is it perfect? No is it close OH, Yeah! I do not think there is a PERFECT bike, just the one that fits your riding best and your body (ergo) best. I needed a more upright position due to back surgery a few years ago. Most of my riding is highway and have been averaging 50+ mpg. Go with your gut and what your pocketbook can afford.
    #18
  19. kars

    kars n00b

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    Follow your heart. Bikes are a passion. I am a very practical person and for most things in life follow function over form but not with bikes. It's not about "cool" for me. The wee is certainly a good bike but lacking character. The scrambler is not a bad bike by any means. I own a Triumph twin. It is a modern motor, a good bike and after 20k in two years has proven to be bulletproof. An easy to ride bike that is easy to maintain and inspires passion. If you truly want to be practical about your bike purchase go for the wee but it sounds to me like you already have passion for the Trumpet.
    #19
  20. Cupid Stunt

    Cupid Stunt Been here awhile

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    Yep, what most of these peeps said
    Biking is emotive, you have to go with what makes you grin
    Personally I'd go for the Triumph absolutely no question, you'll get admiration from all other bikers as well as cagers, Hell even Harley riders have respect for a Triumph, also I bet it'd be easier off-raod than a Strom due to it being lower down in the tank and seat yet still has good ground clearance
    You could ride along imagining yourself as Steve McQueen jumping over that prison fence to escape to freedom

    Oh bollicks, now I want one


    Just get the damned Triumph and stop thinking of practicalities (not that there's ANYTHING impractical about the Scrambler)
    #20