My R1200GSA Step-by-Step Gearbox Removal Process

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by jdub, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. jogo

    jogo Been here awhile

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    :nod

    Thanks so much for sharing!! :clap I'm grateful for every information that makes me feel more independant from dealership.

    Amazing to see in what excellent condition (even dry) you found the clutch splines.

    I have two questions:
    In what condition did you find the splines at the gearbox outlet / driveshaft and did you lube those at any earlier occation?
    Is it really neccessary to disconnect the rear brake from the system or is there a way arround? With the servo ABS system I'm not sure if there is any magic needed to get possible air out of the system if one disconnects it.
    #21
  2. jdub

    jdub Dawg bytes reel gud

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    Disco - Thanks, this is exactly the kind of additional feedback and advice I hoped my original post would generate. :clap

    Your comments on #5 certainly sound several steps quicker than my attack-from-the-top method, and I'll give that a try next time.

    For #9, please share your method as I had anything but an easy time with those clamps. Partly due to where the actual clamp points were positioned on my bike, but I had a very difficult time squeezing each clamp's small "bumps" with pliers (I even tried several different types) to then allow release of the catch mechanism. Even while taking them off, I knew they'd be tough to get back on. I spent about 30 seconds trying to get one back on at reassembly before admitting it just wasn't worth the effort (fight?), tossed them in the trash and got worm-type hose clamps out to replace them. My OEM clamps are gone, but hopefully your info will prove helpful to others. Even BMW used worm clamps in this area on my other bikes to the best of my recollection, so I figured I'd go back to them.

    Absolutely right that my removal of the right side air box-to-TB manifold, and probably the TB itself, was unnecessary, one of those trial and error things I saw in hindsight that I won't remove again.

    Thanks again!

    For others who have asked, I did this write-up in the hopes that it might be useful to others, so please use whatever info you find may assist in your undertakings. Also, thanks to all for the positive feedback!
    #22
  3. jdub

    jdub Dawg bytes reel gud

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    All splines (clutch/GB input shaft, GB output shaft/driveshaft front u-joint, driveshaft rear u-joint/FD input shaft) were in excellent condition with no wear evident. Of course, I lube the driveshaft rear u-joint/FD input shaft splines every 12k miles at FD oil change time. At about 35k miles, the GB output shaft seal was replaced under warranty so the dealer lubed those splines at that time. I don't know if they were dry when he pulled it apart.

    On the other bikes I mentioned on which I've done this task, it was not necessary to disconnect any rear brake lines. That was just not possible on my '07 GSA, as the two hard lines I disconnected were routed through the subframe in such a way that they had to be removed altogether or just removed at the front like I did. Believe me I studied this before doing it, but it was really very quick, easy and painless. Can't answer for servo-assist ABS-equipped bikes, or those without ABS at all, as mine has ABS but is servo-free.
    #23
  4. Disco Dean

    Disco Dean Long timer

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    It really is a feel thing and a proper/good set of pliers that work. Fst - my father had a set of old curved end adjustable pliers that could go wide enough and still keep a perpendicular angle to the little tabs on the clamp - which meant i could grasp the tiny little tabs with a good "purchase" Then it seemed like I had to squeeze really hard and then they just gently popped open - the next one I didn't struggle so much - squeezed and gently angled the pliers and they came off - The trick to getting them on is sort of the same - it feels like you have a lot of force but you realize that they are already clamped and it didn't even feel like they were on. Now I realize this doesn't say to much but I guess what I mean is that it works without a big struggle so be gently but firm - :wink: and the right pliers help immensely. Now I did scratch them up a bit learning but I figure they will be nice enough looking and good for a few more tries.

    I wanted to note about the brake lines - (servo assist - my bike and abs equiped) you have to take the hard lines off like you said and the easiest way is right at the transfer box where you did it. The process for bleeding the brakes is highlighted in JVB's video and on his site - it is pretty simple but more complicated than a non abs/servo - system. It is not rocket science but again the proper tools (ie beemerboneyard funnel) makes the job so much easier.

    And, yes - keeping the swing arm attached with the drive shaft in - is the easiest way as the rubber hood on the drive shaft - to tranny - is a real PITA to get your fingers in when it is all attached - much easier to just clip in the drive shaft and then slide the swing arm over it and align the rubber cover... much much easier.

    Double check your center stand bolts as both of mine were broken - it was a common problem on 05-07 bikes with bolt upgrades and mine proved that.
    #24
  5. jogo

    jogo Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the answer to my question. I do have Jim's DVD and with help of that I renewed the brake fluid some weeks ago. Have not ridden since but I think I got it right. :eek1
    However, during that procedure no air gets into the circuit as the new fluid just pushes out the old.
    When disconnecting the lines one has to assume to get some air in there and I am not sure if one would get that out just by following the procedure of fluid exchange?
    What is your view?:shog
    #25
  6. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    It depends. On a servo-ABS bike the servo pressure will allow an easy flush, even with air in it. On the non-Servo bikes it is still often doable to get the air out, but sometimes you can't get the fluid to flow and need a tool like a mightyvac.

    Jim :brow
    #26
  7. farmerger

    farmerger Snowed in Adventurer

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    I replaced my clutch pressure plate last fall and went through a similar experience. Overall, this is not all that hard to do. Like jdub I replaced the BMW hose clamps with worm style ones. They were easy to take off but mine self-destructed trying to put them back on.

    Here are a couple things I noted during this procedure:
    1. The BMW manual says to replace the top bolt on either side mounting the rear frame to the engine with headless ones, as these also support the frame coming from the front head stock.

    [​IMG]

    This is the bolt I fabbed up. I used my dremel to cut off the head and cut a slot for a flat blade screw driver.

    [​IMG]

    This is the left side bolt, the top one, that is replaced. The one on the right side is in the same spot. Here is a pic with the replacement bolt in place.

    [​IMG]

    2. Here is a picture of the hidden bolt below the air box that holds the rear frame to the engine. Its the one top right in the picture.

    [​IMG]

    3. When you are pulling the rear frame away, if you don't want to mess with your final drive have someone slide the driveshaft of the transmission otherwise, like mine, it may pull forward and slide off the final drive shaft. When reassembling this is also the spot to have a helper guide not only the drive shaft but also the rubber boot onto the transmission. I didn't have a helper and needed plenty of expletives before I had that boot slid over the transmission output.

    4. If, like me, you are in there to do work on your clutch, you just need to remove the six bolts mounting the clutch and pressure plate to the engine output plate. These should be replaced when reassembling. I didn't have the tool for aligning the clutch, so I centered the clutch plate by eye, finger tightened the six bolts, then slid the transmission with the clutch release rod onto its guide pins and tightened up one of the clutch bolts accessible above the transmission. Then I carefully pulled the transmission back of and torqued the bolts properly in the usual criss cross order. Worked like a charm.

    [​IMG]

    That's my contribution to jdub's excellent write up. I have a bunch more pictures, so if someone want to see something not already in pics, let me know and I'll see if I have it.
    #27
  8. Eagleavn

    Eagleavn EagleAvn

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    Now his ego will never be the same.....:freaky

    The Eagle

    PS....nice job...You want to do my 1100GS.....:rofl
    #28
  9. jogo

    jogo Been here awhile

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    Thanks a lot Jim! :D
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  10. bigjohn66

    bigjohn66 Been here awhile

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    About the top bolt "special tool", what's the bolt diameter and length needed? Thanks!
    #30
  11. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    I have a set at home, I'll measure them tonight if no one else chimes in.

    IMHO they should be a little longer than the ones shown here.

    Jim :brow
    #31
  12. farmerger

    farmerger Snowed in Adventurer

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    Its an M10x40, so 10mm diameter 40mm long.

    Jim, not sure what you mean that they should be a little longer? I bought a 40mm and cut the head and a bit of the threads off, came out to be around 35 mm long.:D

    [​IMG]
    #32
  13. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Here is a photo of mine:

    [​IMG]

    As you can see, substantially longer, and my pictorial says 80mm, so I am guessing that was correct. Might be different for an R1200, and I used mine on the bottom, but more length is good IMHO.

    [​IMG]
    With the trans in place.

    [​IMG]
    If you look hard you can see them here.

    1150 pictorial: http://www.bmwbmw.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=10801&hilit=spline+lube

    Jim :brow
    #33
  14. farmerger

    farmerger Snowed in Adventurer

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    Jim,

    I think these are two completely different applications. Yours look like they act as guide pins for aligning the transmission to the engine. The ones I was referring to replace the top bolts that connect the rear frame to the sides of the engine. You don't slide anything over them, but they need to sit flush once inserted so that you can pull the eyelet from the rear frame past them.
    #34
  15. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Ahhhh, sorry, you are correct!:deal

    Sorry for the confusion!

    Jim :brow
    #35
  16. jdub

    jdub Dawg bytes reel gud

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    farmerger - Thanks for posting the additional photos that continue to add good info here. I did my R1100S gearbox removal solo like you did on your GS, and I vowed not to attempt that again during the subframe splitting and remating phases. Like me with the S, you probably made up a few new cuss words along the way. :lol3

    And thanks to all the other contributors as well! :clap
    #36
  17. jdub

    jdub Dawg bytes reel gud

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    Hey, you know I'll work for SB coffee or single malt Scotch. My rates for doing your GS clutch splines should keep me supplied for at least a year or two. :D
    #37
  18. Usmc1968

    Usmc1968 Adventurer

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    Excellent info!!
    Thanks for posting it :freaky
    #38
  19. bob393

    bob393 Been here awhile

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    This took a lot of effort! Thank you for enlightening us. :clap
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  20. wjherrick

    wjherrick Long timer

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    Booked Marked for future reading!

    Bill in OR
    #40