My R1200GSA Step-by-Step Gearbox Removal Process

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by jdub, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. Guy Young

    Guy Young Long timer

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    Fook!, I'll be happy when I can get to that point.

    I've finally managed to get the front u-joint spline to move back about an 1/8", but it's not staying there. Like it's spring-loaded or something. Not so sure there may be something amuck on the butt-end of the drive shaft where the splines engage the final drive.

    I'm going to continue to slowly pull the rear frame section back and see what the front splined joint does. If it looks like it will continue to slide back and off, we may be okay. I can deal with the final drive splines later.

    .
    #61
  2. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    There is a snap ring inside the shaft the clips into a groove on the outside of the output shaft of the trans. It wull snap off with a firm pry from a screwdriver. It is not attached on the other end.

    Just makse sure you have the lower T-40 (IIRC) bolt removed. It is right below the swingarm pivot on a small bracket that attaches to the transmission. I had missed this bolt initially because it is not in the BMW manual, but had the same exact response as you!

    Jim :brow

    PS Pulling back the frame without disconnecting the driveshaft from the clip is what cause my shaft to hang up on the clip groove, Make sure you get it loose so the shaft comes out with the swingarm/frame.
    #62
  3. TXjames

    TXjames High Sider

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    +1

    You SURE you got all the bolts out Guy? :ear
    #63
  4. Makkan

    Makkan n00b

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    Great thread! I just changed the clutch parts on mine thanks to this guide. Everythiing went perfect until i went for the rear part of the bike and noticed that the drive shaft came of the splines in the rear end. its supposed to turn if i spin the wheel, right? :hmmmmm

    What to do now? How to i put the shaft back?
    #64
  5. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Once you get the bike apart the shaft will pull out the swingarm pivot side. Get the shaft back in, pull the rear gaitor aside and work the shaft bak on to the FD splines. It will then be ready for reassembly when you put the bike back together. I need to do the same and will photograph it next week.

    Jim :brow
    #65
  6. Guy Young

    Guy Young Long timer

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    I think this is the bolt you were referring to... Item 4 in the image:

    [​IMG]

    But then, there's always something.

    I purchased a Craftsman bike jack specifically for this job, and for general use in the shop. Came in yesterday and stuck it together last night. Tried to use it today and I'm peeved; danged jack won't hold pressure and stay up. Weight of the lift cradle itself causes it to creep down. I damn sure can't use it like this.

    I've used these lifts before and they always worked great, which is why I decided on this one. Local Sears had one and I did an exchange. New one is together and have the bike elevated now, but am just gonna let it sit there for a spell to see what it does. Unfortunately, kinda have to rely on the hydraulics to keep things elevated. The nearest safety catch notch will put the bike too high.

    So far so good. Bike has been elevated for about 30 minutes and it's staying put. Time to pull the frame bolts.........

    Which I did. It's a done deal now.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    FWIW - the front splined joint slipped right off as I was separating the two halves.

    Anyway, will pull the transmission tomorrow and find out just how bad off the clutch is. A little concerned with the face of the flywheel, but we shall see once we get in there.

    .
    #66
  7. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    I saw that, but the bolt I pulled looked like a normal bolt to me. Then again, the instructions are not that clear.

    None the less, glad you got it out. Good luck on the clutch.

    Oh, and this is how I supported the bike!

    [​IMG]

    Even it I had the jack under it, I doubt it would work well. It it too big and would be in the way. A small scisor jack would work better. The block I used is quite stable.

    Jim :brow
    #67
  8. Guy Young

    Guy Young Long timer

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    I have an overhead chain lift, scissors jack (too concerned with stability), and a regular (Panther) bike lift, but I didn't want to tie it up. I have several more bikes coming in over the next few days and wanted to keep it free. The Craftsman jack will allow me to move the whole front end section around if I have to. It's actually pretty stable... especially with the support straps snugged down. I have a little dolly with full swivel wheels I can put under the front wheel to provide extra support if needed.

    Fun and games, and life goes on. :lol3

    .
    #68
  9. Guy Young

    Guy Young Long timer

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    Well, I pulled the tranny a little while ago. And yes, the alignment dowels were corroded up and caused a little problem separating the tranny from the engine. We eventually got everything loose (at the expense of a good dead blow hammer), but guess that goes with the territory. And yes, the clutch is fried. ***Up to the owner to decide what clutch he wants to put back in it.*** Little bit of grunge around the input shaft of the transmission, but don't think there was enough weepage to cause the problem he had. As a precaution, we'll replace the seal upon reassembly.

    While yanking the transmission was a PITA, the biggest problem (and most time consuming) was pulling the clutch dust cover. The Torx side screws were in there so tight my bits just slipped and they wallowed out. The screw pockets were also pretty shallow and wouldn't allow the bit to get good purchase on the little suckers. Wound up having to use some vise-grips and back them out 1/8 turn at a time until they eventually came free.

    *** I know there is a number of aftermarket clutches out there, but am asking the collective for a recommendation. I don't think that the $$$ will be an issue (within reason); he just wants something that is far more robust than the OEM variety. This one, upon dis-assembly, was really, and I mean really, wimpy.

    All pix of this little adventure at:

    http://gbyoung2.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/Greg-GSA-clutch-problem/28598028_pnTXXt

    .
    #69
  10. TXjames

    TXjames High Sider

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    Don't feel too bad. I think they all do that. Mine certainly does.
    #70
  11. Guy Young

    Guy Young Long timer

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    The new one is holding pressure just fine.

    Put a Sharpie marker line around the piston/cylinder joint last night after I jacked up the bike, and it was holding fast this morning.

    We're happy with this one.

    I'm sure this one is also a China product, but wanted to avoid the issues I've had with some other Torin jack products (Northern Tool, Harbor freight, etc.) which is why I chose this one. Definitely disappointed with the initial jack, but so far so good with this one.

    .
    #71
  12. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Yeah, same with my guy's:

    [​IMG]

    I had one stick. We had to cut it off.

    Looks like you had the same fun as me!

    Jim :brow
    #72
  13. DELTATANGO

    DELTATANGO Motorcyclist and Dog Walk

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    It's horrible.

    It looks like some gigantic insect that has been bitten in half.
    #73
  14. Dracula

    Dracula Dilettante

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    Real interesting and useful thread. It helps me decide if I will have what it takes to tackle such major repair or take it to the dealer. My 07 GS 1200 has now 85,000 miles. I do all my maintenance - thanks also to Jim's DVD. Clutch feels normal still and no issues knock wood so far. But I started thinking maybe I should plan for a clutch inspection/replacement if I were to take a really long trip. Except for occasional stop light holding in, I never abuse the clutch, still wondering what it's expected life or the splines are. Talking to my brother who is an auto mechanic - he says no one ever lubes clutch splines on cars.
    I missed if you posted the mileage on this GS you are working on, although may not mean much about clutch wear - depends on usage and day of week the bike was built, as I gather from similar threads.

    Best,
    Vic
    #74
  15. Guy Young

    Guy Young Long timer

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    Vic, his bike has right around 77K on it.

    I will say this, and I have also mentioned it to the owner, whom I've ridden with quite a few times on his many bikes..... he seems to have a tendency to really slip the clutch when starting out.... whether it be at a stop light or whatever. He really brings up the engine RPM and feathers the clutch (IMHO - excessively) to get under way. I've found no real contamination in the entire clutch assembly, so I am sure his engagement procedure has helped contribute to the failure.

    I have found several more robust friction plates, but it appears the pressure plate assembly here in the US is locked up by BMW. I have asked the collective in the European community I know (through the Concours Owners Group) if there is an offering on that side of the pond that we aren't privy to here. Will see if anything comes back.

    .
    #75
  16. Dracula

    Dracula Dilettante

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    Thanks much for responding. On the GS during the years I find no need to rev the engine above 2,000 rpm to get started. Maybe even less. And I keep slippage time to a minimum, either engaged or disengaged for street riding. It just feels right this way. The motor has so much torque that it will not bog down and can be lugged without problems. Can also start in 2nd gear without much issue if needed.
    Only time slippage seems necessary is if doing trick uphill starts. Or if trailing rear brake in some tight turns. Off road may involve different techniques but other than uphill or deep sand starts and tight turns can't think of other cases. Seems slippage at slow clutch rotational speeds is what will put allot less wear. Some say it is better to keep stock clutch as it was designed as sacrifice wear item vs. other more expensive transmission parts.

    Thanks for posting your work, will follow along to see the project through.

    Best,
    Vic
    #76
  17. Guy Young

    Guy Young Long timer

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    Am looking forward to seeing this thing to completion too. My apologies for not being as detailed and organised as jdub did in his original write-up. Once my hands get greasy, the Powershot doesn't get used until I'm at a convenient stopping point. :lol3

    The GSA's owner also has these in his stable: '07 BMW R1200 GSA (one I'm working on), '05 Honda CRF230F, '62 Ducati 200 Elite, and a '61 BMW R50/2. I've ridden with him all all of them, and he uses the same slippage routine to get rolling. I really can't comment on the CRF230F. I was the one slipping the clutch on my KLR on some of the God-forsaken places he led me to. I was (and still am) nursing the mental image of busting my collarbone up in MT several years ago, and some of the places we went had my anal sphincter puckering big time. Never thought I'd get out of there fully intact with all limbs still functioning. :eek1

    Regardless, we'll keep the pix coming as we move forward. :deal

    .





    '07 BMW R1200 GSA,'05 Honda CRF230F,'62 Ducati 200 Elite,'61 BMW R50/2
    #77
  18. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Rode over to my friend George's shop [​IMG] Picked up a nearly new clutch for 1/3rd of new.

    Old:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    New and old:
    [​IMG]

    New:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Next it goes back in as soon as I receive the new seal for the leaky motor.

    For anyone needing BMW motorcycle work, george is the best!

    Jim :brow

    PS :spam
    Beemers Uber Alles
    9248 Mike Garcia Drive
    Manassas VA 20109
    (571) 318-2472
    #78
  19. Makkan

    Makkan n00b

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    How did you bleed the brakes? Almost finished now..:D
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  20. Lensgrinder

    Lensgrinder Long timer

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    When I did mine I used a "Mighty Vac" which worked fine.
    #80