Need help removing alternator bolt

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by matteo, Oct 30, 2005.

  1. matteo

    matteo HPM

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2005
    Oddometer:
    519
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    I am looking for some help. I have a seeping oil seal behind my alternator. I'm trying to remove the bolt in the center of the alternator, and it is a being a SOB.

    I have the bike in 1st gear and have a foot on the rear brake. I can't a real good jerk on the bolt and it won't come out. I tried rapping on the bolt with a hammer. No luck. I tried to get my manual impact hammper in there, but there is no room.

    I've done this on my /2 and it was not this hard. Please, I need help.

    Once I get this done, I'm thinking of replacing the alternator with the EnduraLast alternator.
    http://www.euromotoelectrics.com/EDLBMW.html
    I've read some good reports on this product. Anyone have a bad experience?
    #1
  2. Frank Warner

    Frank Warner Traveller

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    Try it with the engine hot.
    Use yer gloves or you'll burn yourself on those flamin exhaust pipes.
    #2
  3. Donkey Hotey

    Donkey Hotey De Jo Momma

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    The hot engine is a good idea. You also know that you need a puller to get the rotor off, right? If you're not prepared for it, you can make your own (I did). The inside of the rotor has threads that are larger than the center screw. I forgot the diameter.

    The puller looks like a normal bolt with a long threadless nose. It fits those threads in the rotor and goes all the way to the bottom of the threaded hole in the crankshaft. You screw it into the rotor, the long protrusion bottoms in the crank and you keep cranking until it pushes the rotor off the crank.

    The trick is making your own puller. All I did was get a bolt that fit the rotor threads. Next I measured down into the crankshaft with a straw or something for reference. I cut the shank out of a smaller diameter bolt, pushed it down into the crank hole, then followed with the bolt. Crank away and the rotor pops right off.
    #3
  4. bcostell

    bcostell Been here awhile

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    As the other guys say...you need a puller, but first you need to get the bolt out. I find that a air impact wrench removes just about anything....the alternator bolt would be NO problem. The bolt is torqued to less than 20ft/lbs so I just tap the end of my ratchet and it breaks free. I only need to worry about being in gear for tightening it up again.

    If you're removing all of the stuff to upgrade the alternator you might want to think about replacing the timing chain and tensioner - it's only about another hours work once you have all of the electrics out of the way.

    On the upgrade, I've fitted both of the 400 and 450w systems.

    400W System - a neat system with an upgraded diode board on solid mounts with an uprated voltage regulator. Same basic configuration as stock, just higher spec and some of the stock systems weakness's ironed out.
    [​IMG]

    Three rotors - stock, 400W and 450W. The 450W rotor is the lightest. It's a lump of aluminum with permanent magnets - no brushes

    [​IMG]

    450W System. All of the controls are external to the timing cover.
    [​IMG]

    Location of 450W Rectifier/Regulator Unit (on a GS). This replaces the regulator and rectifier combo used in the stock and 400w systems.
    [​IMG]
    #4
  5. sharkey

    sharkey XLV750R

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    Put it in 5th. The engine has less leverage against the rear wheel
    that way, and there's less play. Buy a set of allen key sockets
    and a breaker bar ... it'll come out.

    Just installed mine tonight ... all good so far.

    -----sharks
    #5
  6. jtwind

    jtwind Wisconsin Airhead

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    A note on removing the rotor. You can't just put the remover bolt in and crank away. At least half the time you will bend the puller and get nowhere. The trick is to turn the puller so it is very snug and rap the end of the puller with a hammer/rock etc. The rotor will pop off. Be prepared to catch it! JT
    #6
  7. matteo

    matteo HPM

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    Absolutely fuckin' fantastic. I got the bolt off. Putting it into fifth gear was the trick and a foot on the brake. There was no play on the crank while I gave the allen wrench a few jerks. It came right out. :rofl

    I have the puller I used from the /2 rebuild. Worked just fine.

    Now that the alternator is off, I can replace the seals. I have the EnduroLast on order.

    Thanks to everyone for the help.
    #7
  8. matteo

    matteo HPM

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    That is one clean engine. It is going to take me some work before mine will look so good.
    #8
  9. sharkey

    sharkey XLV750R

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    Glad to hear it worked!

    The puller I've got came with the bike, it's just a M8x1.25x80mm bolt with the last 28mm turned down to 6mm diameter and the end rounded off nicely. Took almost no torque to make the rotor pop off.

    -----sharks
    #9
  10. LoFlow

    LoFlow Long timer

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    So guys, I now carry a spare rotor, diode board, and regulater with me at all times on my pd.

    My question is, with the 450 watt system do you have to carry any spares? It seems like a really nice system. Thanks for any info. bye
    #10
  11. sharkey

    sharkey XLV750R

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    Spare 30A blade fuse?

    In theory, there's nothing to burn out: no brushes, no rotor windings, no toasty-hot diodes. If you're planning on traversing the icy plateau of Leng, far beyond the reaches of mortal postal deliveries, you could presumably obtain a spare regulator and a spare set of stator windings -- they're OEM (Ducati Energia?) units and the fancy EME machining is the rotor adaptor and the stator winding mounting rings.

    Only time will tell how reliable these units are, but given that they're a hell of a lot simpler and better cooled than the stock setup, I'd be amazed if they don't prove more reliable.

    -----sharks (Disclaimer: just a happy customer)
    #11
  12. bcostell

    bcostell Been here awhile

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    I'm taking a loooong trek next year. The only spare I'm taking is this regulator/rectifier unit. I've wired it so I can do a quick swap - my guess would be a half hours changeover - lift the tank and undo a couple of bolts and connectors. Apart from that only the field coils could fail and I question the chances of that.
    [​IMG]
    #12
  13. Frank Warner

    Frank Warner Traveller

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    That would be stator coils (the field comes from the magnets).

    The usuall failure mode (for this entire charging system) for the regulator/rectifier falure - it also will boil the battery dry. Monitoring the battery voltage while riding (just like a standard airhead system) is a good idea (saves the battery if your are quick enough).

    Stator failures are less frequent.

    The fues holder on the orange wire is not splash proof. Water proof ones can be had (and have much better contact to the fuse) [Sharks - Dick Smith has them about $5 each - I've changed over to them from the previous $3 ones due to the contact problem {yes on the K75G/S}].
    #13
  14. sharkey

    sharkey XLV750R

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    My kit came with a rubber fuse holder with waterproof snap-on lid ... seems like
    pretty good contacts, too. So I just used that. At some point I'd like to get hold of a waterproof fusebox though, and put all three circuits (main power, light power, generator) through three 30A fuses in the one box ... it'd save having three seperate ring lugs on the battery, if nothing else.

    Rode the bike into work today, the generator has added a faint whine to the engine noise, only really audible when stationary and wearing an open-face. Presumably the fins on the rotor whirring around, or maybe it's just echoing around in that
    vast open space :-).

    -----sharks
    #14
  15. SmutMug

    SmutMug Banned

    Joined:
    May 29, 2004
    Oddometer:
    40
    I got my kit on Monday night. It's going in my '83R80T first for a few months and then will be transplanted in the R80G/S. In the RT, there's not a lot of space (complicated due to the fact the voltage regulator decided to have spun screws), so I am going to attach the rectifier to the front right frame tube. This locates it invisibly right behind the grille. It's directly in the airflow that way as well. I bought a car-quality ground cable that will go to the battery negative and I'l get another ground somewhere as backup.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>

    <o:p></o:p>

    As well, I bought a voltage meter from Datel that is very accurate. They are for sale here: http://tinyurl.com/7h5os This will allow me to keep an eye on things.<o:p></o:p>

    <o:p></o:p>

    When I transplant this unit to the G/S, the real test will begin. I'm leaving April 10, '06 for Europe for a 2 year around the world trip. A big part of the incentive for the Enduralast is reliability. I'll take an extra rectifier, but I can leave rotors, diode boards and the like behind.<o:p></o:p>

    <o:p> </o:p>

    As well, I’ll be charging a laptop and batteries from the bike battery, so maximum charge after a day of loitering through Eastern villages is going to be needed for all this. I ride a lot too, so it’ll be nice to have one less worry during my regular motoring around here. <o:p></o:p>
    #15
  16. matteo

    matteo HPM

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    We'll be expecting a travel blog here.
    #16
  17. sharkey

    sharkey XLV750R

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    I've got to be honest with you, it's a pretty easy install but removing the
    old bits and installing the new rec/reg is involved enough that I'd just bung
    it on the 80G/S right away if that's where you want it ...

    Well, it's up to you but I can't help reckoning that carrying a laptop everywhere would be a pain in the arse ... camera gear is bad enough, but laptops get shaken to bits ... and if you're busy worrying about your stuff getting stolen you can't ever quite relax. Internet Cafés seem a better bet to me ...

    -----sharks
    #17
  18. SmutMug

    SmutMug Banned

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Sharkey, I'm not worried about rigging it up on the G/S. That bike just got rebuilt from the ground up, so the bits are all fresh and can easily be taken apart again. I ride a lot and the RT will be the test machine for the next five months. The G/S will only see a few thousand miles before I leave, to break it in and shake out the tuning. As far as a laptop goes … I’ve got one that can withstand the vibrations (Fujitsu P5020, it’s lived on the G/S for the last few years). As well, I have a backup hard drive with a mirror image IF the one in the machine fails. Backups are on 4 Gig SanDisk memory sticks and CD’s to be created on the road and sent home for safekeeping. Needed for thousands of pictures and travel writing … not something I want to do in internet cafes… I suspect the Enduralast to be ok, but I want to clock 20K or so on it before I trust leaving with it … replacing stock parts is not going to be a deal killer if you’re in India or Pakistan, but if the Enduralast dies … I debated upgrading earlier to the Motorrad Electric 400 Watt system, but it’s basically the same as stock, except that the rotor is a tad bigger and it has all the old failure points of the stock system. A new stock rotor won’t help there either, as you have to use the one supplied by Motorrad. I think the Enduralast is the way to go for what I want.
    #18
  19. sharkey

    sharkey XLV750R

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    Ah, fair enough, horses for courses and all that.

    I suspect that one's a bit of a furphy ... even if your bike rolls to a halt outside the biggest bike shop in Bangalore, the odds of them stocking a BMW rotor are ... vanishingly remote. It's probably quicker and cheaper to order it in from Europe or the States anyway. So you might as well be ordering from Motorrad Elektric or EuroMotoElectrics or whoever anyway.

    -----sharks
    #19
  20. Frank Warner

    Frank Warner Traveller

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    Yes and no.

    I did a fork seal out of Alice Springs. The bm dealer did not have one in stock. But the Suzie dealer did - he was doing up an old bm and they used the same seal for 20+ years?

    Oh - the rotor maybe the same as ones used by MotoGuzzie.
    The oil pressure switch is the same as used by airhead beattles.
    And so on.

    I'd think in Bangalore you'd find a craftsman to make almost anything. Probably cheaper than the postage too.
    #20