Need help

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by clang, May 4, 2004.

  1. clang

    clang Not lost, Exploring!

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Oddometer:
    2,815
    Location:
    Denver/Aspen
    I am going to pick up my new (to me) R100GSPD tomorrow after work, and I am going to trailer it home :hide

    I have never had my bikes on a trailer before, and I want to make sure I secure it properly. I have rented a motorcycle specific trailer from U-Haul, and I have 4 heavy duty ratcheting tie down straps. Where and how do I attach them? How tight do I make them? It doesn't seem right to cinch them down so tight that I am compressing the suspension fully or almost fully, but I don't want bumps in the road to produce slack in the straps from suspension compression either.

    Any and all help is appreciated........ :ear
    #1
  2. Jim Bud

    Jim Bud Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2003
    Oddometer:
    3,439
    Location:
    Castle Rock, CO
    attach from the front handle bars ( both sides) and the rear both sides. You want to pull the bike toward the front of the trailer with the front wheel up against the fornt of the trailer.

    Compress about 50% of the travel in front and less in back.

    Start out lose and equally tighten around the bike.

    Watch out for places where the tie downs will rub on stuff and either move the tie down, re-route it or pad the tie down as if travels accross the part of the bike it is touching.

    The bike will bounce up and down as you drive and from side to side; so leave room on the sides of the bike.


    Adn SMILE as you drive home...the fun is just beginning :thumb :thumb
    #2
  3. ImaPoser

    ImaPoser adventure imposter

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2002
    Oddometer:
    16,035
    Location:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    #3
  4. Waco

    Waco Renegade Sickle Hound

    Joined:
    May 16, 2002
    Oddometer:
    14,973
    Location:
    Waco, Texas
    I would say compress most of the travel. DAMHIK Use at least 4 tie-downs. 5 or 6 is better. I like to run one through the front tire and strap it directly to the front rail. Make sure the straps aren't rubbing on the bike. Rubbing the paint off sucks. Remove bodywork if necessary. Tape the ends with duct tape so they can't fall off if they get loose. Stop and check them every few miles. I hate hauling bikes. I get a sore neck from checking the mirror and looking over my shoulder.
    #4
  5. terry.mc

    terry.mc Stop ruining my vacation

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2003
    Oddometer:
    5,819
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Don't leave the sidestand down.

    DAMHIK

    :1drink
    #5
  6. Infracaninophile

    Infracaninophile Finding My Way..

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2001
    Oddometer:
    7,524
    Location:
    New England, USA
    Clang:

    First of all, you are welcome to borrow my 3-rail MC trailer. I live in COS> It is very easy to move any bike with this kind of trailer.

    Second, use something called a Canyon Dancer. It is a $20 device which is made of nylon webbing and fits over the handlebars by fitting over the handgrips. It then allows you to fasten tie downs to the ends of this w/o damaging the bike. They can be had at almost any bike dealer. In fact, I can lend you one if you like. I have 2.

    On a GS/PD with the OEM luggage racks I would suggest:

    1. Canyon dancer over the bars with tie downs fastened to it. If no canyon dancer, then use soft ties on the handlebars and then use ties downs on these.

    2. On the rear, fasten tie downs to luggage rack, or if you have more soft ties, fasten the soft ties to the rack and then tie downs to them.

    And yes, if using a Uhaul or such put the sidestand and centerstand up. Compress > 50% and less than 100%. I think 75% is fine since it's not a long journey. Four tie downs is plenty.

    I always try to remember to remove the key from the bike's ignition and bring it inside the car....

    I hope this helps.

    Tom
    #6
  7. irazu

    irazu Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2003
    Oddometer:
    214
    Location:
    Seattle/Houston
    As has been allready mentioned. You definitly want to compress the front end.

    I have seen a bike that was sinched down pretty good come loose when the trailer hit a bump and the forks compressed enough so that the tie-downs came loose (hook came off handle bars) and the bike fell over.

    Enjoy the new ride :thumb
    #7
  8. Hair

    Hair Outside the boxer

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2003
    Oddometer:
    14,320
    Location:
    Northern New Mexico
    I would pickup as may tie downs as you like.
    Four might hold the bike just fine.
    But four more will do it better.
    I once hauled a bike 1200 miles. I used 16 tie downs.
    Still one managed to break when I hit an unexpected bump in the road. No damage. But in your case. Brake one, left with three.

    Just before you tie it down. Pitcher a spider web. Hold that thought for a bit. Then go to work and tie that bike down.
    #8
  9. TonyA

    TonyA beta tester

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2003
    Oddometer:
    1,159
    Location:
    East of Bonneville, North of Moab
    I use 4 for starters: 2 in front pulling down on the handle bars right next to the risers, pulling the bike forward into the chock, and two in back hooked to the pillion footpeg mounts. Everything pulls outward from the bike's center in X fashion. These really should be the ratchet type. Forget about the simple cam type unless you snug them with two people on the bike compressing the suspension. I have a difficult time getting the cam-style into a strong tension.

    Then add redundant straps in case any of the first 4 break or come undone. You want independent connection points both on the bike and on the trailer if possible. Anything can break. These straps can be the non-ratchet kind if that's all you have left. If a main strap fails then it's backup will be in tension right away, good enough to let you stop and fix the problem.

    Yeah it takes a while to do but then it frees my mind if I'm trailering through Owl Canyon's potholed dirt. Most trailers have little if any damping so the bike needs to be secure to the trailer for those times that the trailer goes temporarily airborne. We've got some deep storm water drainage channels crossing the intersections in town here and if I cross at an angle there can be a terrible waggling shake. If the bike's shaking it's working it's way loose.
    #9
  10. clang

    clang Not lost, Exploring!

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Oddometer:
    2,815
    Location:
    Denver/Aspen
    Thanks for all the tips and info :nod I really appreciate it. I'm off in about 45 minutes to go get the beast :thumb
    #10
  11. harpoon

    harpoon Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Oddometer:
    2,734
    Location:
    Out-of-pocket
    This is not the voice of experiance since I prefer to ride, but I have tied mine down once and tied the front from the forks just above the fork brace over the finder. Wasn't compressing the suspension at all. Snerked it down good against the front tire and seemed pretty dang stable.

    Is this not good????
    #11
  12. Marc

    Marc Just sayin...

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2001
    Oddometer:
    8,967
    Location:
    PNW
    I use a brace between the top of the front tire and the bottom triple clamp to keep the suspension from compressing when I tie my DRZ down for towing (don't trailer or tow the GS). I've been told it's bad to compress the suspension fully for an extended period of time...but that could be Urban Legend. :dunno
    #12
  13. Rad

    Rad Just me

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2001
    Oddometer:
    12,176
    Location:
    Santa Cruz, Calif
    Not a big deal, use common sense.

    Stop after a mile or two and double check everything.

    The front two straps are the important ones, the rear just keeps it in line. Make sure the front two straps go forward not just to the side.

    It helps if ya don't have a wheel chock to secure the front wheel so it can't move side to side.
    #13
  14. FatChance

    FatChance Road Captain

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2003
    Oddometer:
    10,796
    Location:
    Durango, Colorado, USA
    I just towed my GS from Denver to Durango, in addition to the other advice, I put a tight safety strap holding the front tire to the front railing of the trailer, "just in case". That way, worst case, it might tip over, but will not fall off the trailer.
    #14
  15. Waco

    Waco Renegade Sickle Hound

    Joined:
    May 16, 2002
    Oddometer:
    14,973
    Location:
    Waco, Texas
    I shipped my bikes once. They used special wooden pallets and tied to the forks without compressing the suspension. It looked less stable to me, but it seemed to work fine and the straps were still tight when they delivered them. The pallet prevented the tires from moving side to side, so I don't know if I would try this with a flat trailer.
    #15