New 2012 Honda NC700X 700cc Parallel Twin!

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by Two Plugs, Sep 27, 2011.

  1. Cortez

    Cortez BAZINGA!

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    +1 but bare in mind that all street legal exhausts are as quiet (and some
    even quieter) as stock at half the available revs with the dB killer insert in.

    I've seen a couple of measurements for my ex 650 going from 86 to 89dB
    for different pipes, and stock was 90dB (and rather loud subjectively) at
    4750 revs.

    But yeah, money, a freakin' Leo Vince for my scooter is $500+.
    :huh
  2. L.B.S.

    L.B.S. Long timer

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    Heh, heh :D

    I have an EU certified street legal Giannelli full system with dB killer intact on my CBR125R, and ooh boy. It says "Giannelli Silencers" on the plate riveted to the carbon can, but it should totally say: "Giannelli Loudeners" lol :lol3

    It's incredibly loud. And if I take the baffle out, OMFG! I can easily compete with Harleys, and no car alarm within blocks is safe! :eek1 How that much noise can be produced by an engine with a piston the size of a Jiffy Marker cap, is beyond me...
  3. flatboarder

    flatboarder Been here awhile

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    The Akrapovic sounds nearly identical to stock exhaust which is perfectly nice. I like it very much. No noise pollution, perfectly suited for long distance, relaxed riding without any loss in performance. 2.1kg of weight and a perfect fit at installation. I have got a video comparing stock sound to akrapovic sound inside of my garage (which makes it seem louder than it actually is). There is a slight difference concerning the structure of the sound. The akrapovic has got slightly stronger "side noises" but is not louder at all. When riding you will not notice a big difference, no matter whether riding at slow speed or full throttle. I have been using mine for 6000km and it did not increase its noise up to now.
    In my opinion it is very well suited for the NC, because it does not change its riding quality and relaxed attitude, while offering a more technical and up to date look and 1,7kg of loss in weight.
    By the way the Akrapovic (and AFAIK the Leo Vince as well) does not get hot when riding. You can put your hand on it after a lengthy ride. Never try with the stock exhaust!
  4. opmike

    opmike Choosing to be here.

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    The NC doesn't sound too bad at all for a parallel twin. Dear Honda and motorcycle manufacturers in general: Please, stop using 180 degree twins. The awful sound is enough bring a dragon to tears.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuf9HAagqqw
  5. DeejayP999

    DeejayP999 Adventurer

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    Sadly, I noticed exactly this issue when I test rode a DCT model.

    I wasn't sure if it applied to all NC700X's, just the example I rode or whether it was related to the DCT 'box (which seemed to have some odd shift points which may have exacerbated the problem).

    I pointed it out to the dealer and told him that I'd have to test ride a manual version before I could make a decision. He became a deal less friendly after that - and so lost the sale.

    I still haven't ridden a manual as yet, although it remains on my "To do" list.
  6. oldenuf

    oldenuf Been here awhile

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    Good you got a test ride, now you can move on to a machine you like.

    Art
  7. Fidl2n

    Fidl2n Adventurer

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    I've really enjoyed this monstrous thread, I gotta say. Especially all the modding and add-ons of Beemerphile. Really looking at this bike hard lately with a couple reservations: My current bike, a CB600 which I have loved and modified in minor ways over the last four years, has been turned into a little not-so-naked mini tourer. Other than being a bit beat up on the open slab due to basically no protection (except for an aftermarket Givi screen), I've been happy with it.

    Then I realized I was lusting for something with a bit more range, maybe a little more power or protection, but at bargain basement, since I've only ever bought the three bikes owned used (Reflex, Buell Blast and the CB600). Toyed with the idea of getting a two cylinder Beemer 650 gs, but they seem dear and hard to find (and potentially a mechanical nightmare) and not meant to be a touring rig really even with a lot of modding, which I would do. There's a very good Honda shop up the road for when I need any heavy duty work (or I blow it). The only real competition for me at the moment is the Wee. But totally different machine (my indecision). But lots out there used for the patient, which I could be.

    My only worry with the NC, is that I'll miss the HP on the SoCal freeway in and outa town, which, though I'm unmercifully buffeted on my hornet, has the oompah to get on past the crazies. But sorta unpleasant as it gets over about 70mph for any duration. Only considering the X, btw. I'm looking to retain the fun of the hornet in the twisties and sweepers, but have more comfort on the open road for some weekend/light touring. Looking to see if more touring is for me with more of a bike meant for it. And, a smaller bike appeals, as I'm a smaller person (hornet is just right, size wise). 5'5", 140lb, 32" inseam. I like to not be on my toes.

    I have not had a chance to try either the DL or the NC, yet. Tried the Versys this summer and was disappointed at the engine feel. Way too shakey/vibratey, though it seemed to ride the rail on turns. Also tried the FZ6, which I sorta liked, but didn't improve range and wasn't quite upright enough for my ergos, though I did enjoy the engine by comparison.

    Rowdymoose! You are exactly the person to give me your additional thoughts, as I see you have owned a Wee and live in SoCal. Any allaying of my HP fears as far as real world performance? I just like the "idea" and look of the adventure rigs (thus the Wee), but don't seriously think there's any more than a fire road or two in my future. The HP on my hornet is far higher and I worry a bit about being able to get around the wackos on the fwy.

    Thanks for your perspective.

    Blah, blah, blah, Tapatalk.
  8. Cortez

    Cortez BAZINGA!

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    All the pictures of the NC I posted are of my cousins bike who went from
    the 06 599 to the NC700x this year. Put 20k miles on the Hornet.

    He never looked back.
    The NC is a lot slower, but that's about the only advantage it has
    over the NC.

    And about vibrations.. I hated my 650R (Versys engine is the same) because of the vibes,
    and while the NC700X also has some, they're completely different and there's a lot less
    of them - I could live with that.
  9. Fidl2n

    Fidl2n Adventurer

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    Thanks, Cortez. Exactly the sort of input I'm looking for. Did your cousin go for any of tha factory add-ons (esp any of the rider pro bits)?

    And here's the crux: what exactly is the experience of "a lot slower"? As in, I can't drag against a hornet, or I have difficulty passing on the fwy w/o hitting the rev limiter? I know it's hard to quantify without an actual demo. I just like to get a better idea.
  10. Cortez

    Cortez BAZINGA!

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    None!
    He had only a pair of leovince exhausts on his 599 and a tiny windscreen,
    and he's saving up for an exhaust for his NC700X, not planning to add
    anything else.

    Hitting the rev limiter is something very familiar to any owner of this bike,
    but that has nothing to do with it being slow, it's just the way it is with it's
    low redline and effortless revving.

    I can overtake without much trouble on my 30hp scooter, so you'll be
    fine with 50hp on the NC, just make sure you're not in 6th gear.
  11. awork13

    awork13 Gas was made to burn

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    This is my bosses bike, he hand made the skid plate and yes that is a winch on the back. He is working on an aux gas tank for it now. Steadily getting 68-70 mpg. We cut the tack weld out of the can insert on the Akro can, sounds really good in person and not loud at all with the cat still in place



    [​IMG]

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  12. beemerphile

    beemerphile Long timer

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    Regarding the lack of speed on this bike, I think you just have to be at a point that you are ready for that. Heck, it will run high-13 second quarter miles which would have been a hot car to be proud of in the seventies. I have hit the rev limiter three times, but two of them were on the drive home from the dealer. You learn not to drive it that way. It will pass slow traffic. You wont hit the rev limiter passing someone in 5th or 6th gear. It has enough acceleration to satisfy me but every other 650+ except for a few thumper dual sports is going to kick its ass. BFD.

    I just put a heated leather Russell seat on mine and upgraded the driving lights. As (greatly) modified, it is the most thoroughly satisfying bike I have owned in 45 years of this hobby. I can't kick anyone's ass on it, but at this stage in my riding career that is fine. If I want to get there sooner I will start earlier.

    I was considering either this bike or a KTM 990 SM-T. I finally decided that most of the things that the KTM did better were either illegal, or dangerous, or both. I "accepted" the bike on a test ride but I lamented leaving the red-headed temptress at the altar until a nice long trip to upstate New York this fall that cemented the relationship. I hardly ever think of what's-her-name any more. Well, only every time I see one, but this girl is better for me.
  13. Mike Cash

    Mike Cash Been here awhile

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    Percisely!

    (What a shame your passion for "percision" doesn't extend to English usage).
  14. oldenuf

    oldenuf Been here awhile

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    So, I take that you bought one and just could not deal with this "lack of soul" and sold it?

    Art
  15. oldenuf

    oldenuf Been here awhile

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    Since taking delivery of my NC700X, I just want to get out and ride it, and it is totally stock. It will cut and dice traffic, wear the tires to the edge and eat up miles. I could care less if you don't like how it looks and the HP numbers.

    Art
  16. Mike Cash

    Mike Cash Been here awhile

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    What makes you think that?
  17. oldenuf

    oldenuf Been here awhile

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    Just seemed, that to agree that the Honda NC700, has "no soul" and is just a mechanical piece of transportation should be based on personal experience. But you are certainly allowed to make that conclusion.

    Art
  18. beemerphile

    beemerphile Long timer

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    Before you guys get crossways, I think Art's comment was in response to Skapegoat's diatribe.
  19. Kart22

    Kart22 Adventurer

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    Regarding power, I have an NC with 2000 miles on the clock. It pulls harder than the G650X-moto I traded in for it.
    The torque is just wonderful: it throws me back every time and is quite amazing for such an 'economical' bike.


    Let's get one thing straight here... This isn't a bike to take to the track. It's not an annoying 4-cylinder turning 18000 rpm.

    This is a bike that just makes sense. It fills the gaps where other bikes don't. As an engineer, I appreciate the thought process behind the design/manufacture of the NC.


    • The amount of liquid in an engine's short coolant loop is nearly directly proportional to the warm-up time and amount of pre-expansion wear that an engine obtains. By running the water pump off the cam, you eliminate additional parasitic losses and inertial elements of a shaft to run the impeller and greatly shorten the coolant loop. Your engine heats up faster to its operating temperature at which it runs at a higher thermodynamic efficiency. Carrying less fluid attributes to a weight savings and less environmental impact with the reduction of propylene glycol.

    • One of the highest maintenance costs of my BMW motorcycle was adjusting the valve lash of the Rotax single of a nearly vertical cylinder orientation. Removing the valve covers required the removal of the airbox, fairings, battery, and the rest of the top of the bike. Also, the valve actuation was of a shim-on-bucket kind and required specific shims to get my valve lash set properly. What was a design engineer thinking when that BMW was designed? Tools every engineer should utilize is DFMA (design for manufacturing and assembly) and serviceability. I understand the BMW market doesn't target customers that like to turn wrenches, but providing this hassle is just a poor design. Shim-on-bucket does typically hold tighter tolerances but is just a pain in the ass. Fortunately, Honda swept they cylinders forward on the NC so only the radiator has to be loosened to access the valve covers. Also, the valve clearance is adjustable so no shims are required..just basic hand tools.

    • Some may complain about the NC's tank being located under the seat. It's not an inconvenience to turn the key and unlock the rear seat to remove the gas cap. In addition, the location of the tank promotes a low CG that contributes to a more stable motorcycle, especially in crosswinds where the aerodynamic center of pressure is offset by the low cg. Fuel economy is just fantastic: I am getting 70+ reliably.

    We can go on and on about the NC. It has a lot of "smart" thoughts behind it that many overlook. If you want a crotchrocket, please leave this thread and go buy one. You won't see this bike on your local track too often, but you can bet your ass that it'll outlast most motorcycles on the road.

    -Ryan
  20. Mike Cash

    Mike Cash Been here awhile

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    You missed the fact that I was mocking the imprecision of a guy who seemed so fixated on "percision".

    I am quite contented with my NC700X.