New Aprilia Tuareg?

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by Gian, Mar 29, 2010.

  1. Pcfly

    Pcfly Dude?! Seriously??

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    It's nice to believe in fairy dust.........or photoshop?! :lol3

    Hmmmm.......name that bike....... I see a Super Tenere, a Kawi Ninja 650 rear shock, Tenere bags, Husky Nuda headlight, XT660Z windscreen..........:wink:
  2. Evil Invader

    Evil Invader Been here awhile

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    I need to see the bathroom... :puke2
  3. herrPezzel

    herrPezzel Adventurer

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    Well, I see a Super Tenere, a Dorsoduro and a Pegaso. And that's one ugly photoshop!
  4. Precis

    Precis Maladroit malcontent

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    No new Tuareg yet, but have any of you nay-sayers compared the predictions here to the eventual 1200 Caponot?
  5. JohnG.

    JohnG. Long timer

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    New mid weight Tuareq / Capo sounds good...
    BTW,Here in northern OZ, people are wary of the new Caponord 1200 but like Ducati Multi 1200 or anything Ducati, Harley, Jap MXers etc.
    Aprilias seem to be a capital city thing...probably due to their scooters and the RSVs...??
  6. dsgfh

    dsgfh n00b

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    As a 5'8" tarmac rider coming off 11 years of sports bikes, I ended up opting for a Caponord 1200 after straddling a few bikes for fit & riding both it and a 1200GS. I think it & the multi really target the aging sports bike rider looking for an upright tourer. Then again I am in the heart of Melbourne and 500m from a dealer at work.
    A couple of teething issues that the dealer has sorted out for me, but a great bike for my purposes. No illusions of being Charlie or Ewan here. Not any time in the next 10 years anyway.
  7. Precis

    Precis Maladroit malcontent

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    I have a couple of the original Caponords - and tried the 1200 CapoNot: a nice bike if you have a pressing need for 175 km/h in a 60 zone in third gear (I think!), but as I ride some dirt just to get home, completely impractical for me.
    No-one seems to be able to fathom just why the factory gave this all-new bike the same name as a decade-plus model that didn't have the greatest of reputations for reliability (easily sorted out in an hour, but the mud sticks!); it's a different engine, different frame - and different application.
    If your dealer is in Elzabeth Street - ask him about the running-in map and see what he says... this would be the same place that insisted that Guzzi don't make a 1400....
    See you at the Capo-specific forum over at http://www.apriliaforum.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?106-2014-Caponord-1200
  8. dsgfh

    dsgfh n00b

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    You'll have no doubt noted that I'm a regular over on ApriliaForum. & yes, I certainly knew more about the bike than the dealer when I walked in the door, but thanks to the wonder that is Google that's been the case on every purchase I've made for the last few years.

    I'm familiar with the running in map (the bike has a software set limit at 9,000 RPM at the moment), so not sure why I'd care to ask them.

    I won't try to guess on the name choice, but I've certainly got no qualms taking the bike down a graded dirt road which it handles just fine (even with TC & ABS on). I wouldn't try running it through thick gravel, sand, do a river crossing or take it across a paddock, but then buying a chook chaser that did those things wouldn't suit my purposes either.

    I'm not sure that the bike is a different purpose though. Perhaps in their mind the purpose was always a go-anywhere bike. They've just moved the balance point between road and trail back to the road side of the equation given a fair percentage of riders never actually venture far off the beaten track (members of this forum obviously excluded).
  9. dsgfh

    dsgfh n00b

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    Okay, so I do have one theory on the name. Perhaps they simply realised that the E69, which takes you to the North Cape, is actually tarmac all the way & doesn't need a true dual-sport to get you there.
    Given the tunnel was opened in 1999, 2 years before the Caponord was released (but no doubt after it's conception), perhaps it was the original model that was mis-named :evil
  10. JohnG.

    JohnG. Long timer

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    That pretty much sums it up...not keen, even though theres a new Dealer up the road (450km) from here...mixed reports apparently.
    BTW what teething issues :ear
  11. dsgfh

    dsgfh n00b

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  12. JohnG.

    JohnG. Long timer

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    Thanks,...so just the usual niggling things of a new low volume model,
    and your Dealer is learning along the way :clap:
    Unlike some up here who just want sales...
    BTW, they have suspension maps now! 'doesn't sound good for us DIYers.
  13. dsgfh

    dsgfh n00b

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    Yeah, certainly nothing serious & all easily addressed before leaving the dealer as long as you know in advance.
    The electronic suspension will certainly divide opinion. I wouldn't have it on a track bike where I wanted fine control, but for touring, being able to set the thing in auto & just about forget about it is brilliant. I don't know about you, but in the past I've tended to set bikes up well for one set of conditions & live with the compromises the rest of the time. Problem is that I spent more time compromised than not.
    Now the compromise is probably all the time, but it's a hell of a lot closer all the time too. No more spine jarring commuting because my bike is set up only for weekend twisties at full lean.