New Brewery!

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by levain, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. P B G

    P B G Long timer

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    Careful w/ that stuff, its pretty hang over inducing.

    [​IMG]


    I'm waiting on the middle one, SG has leveled off at 1.007 with the airlock bubbling about every 3rd minute today.
  2. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams

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    You guys are making me crazy. I haven't brewed in so long. After the new year, my new setup will be in place. The "New Brewery" evolves:clap
  3. P B G

    P B G Long timer

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    Try copper piping it in the keg.

    Take some copper pipe (clean/new) and clean and sanitize it. Pop your keg (if a Corny) and stand the copper pipe in there with the lid sealed for a bit. Then repressurize and let it stand cold for awhile, then I'd probably sample, and vent the CO2 again and repressurize it.

    The one against the wall in the pic is being degassed, then it will be sweetened and bottled.

    I've been fermenting these batches with temps in the mid to upper 90's. They're in a cool corner, but I've seen temps in the high 80's.
  4. Barron

    Barron M0DAH0LIC

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    Now you tell me :baldy

    just kidding... :lol3 I kind of figured on that, so I took it pretty easy on it's test run. Next time I'll heed the warning though :D
  5. fifthcircle

    fifthcircle Beer Knurd

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    Anyone in this thread going to West Fest? I will share some home brew, if you will share back :deal
  6. tootal

    tootal Backroad traveler

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    I should be kegging the Pre Prohibition Pils this weekend. We took all six row malt with 30 percent rice and cluster hops and brewed a nice five percent lager. These were the most common ingredients, along with corn, that they had to brew with back then. The six row malt was not very efficient so they had to use a lot of it to get any alcohol. This caused problems because the husk from all that malt would make the beer dark and give it an astringent taste. They finally discovered that rice and corn could be converted using the enzymes in six row malt. (Six row has more of these enzymes than two row does.) By using 30 to 40 percent adjucts the beers could easily hit their targets and they were golden in color and tasted much better. So for those that think American breweries use adjucts because they're cheaper, you now know it was a way to brew a European style beer using what they had. :beer

    Once again, necessity is the mother of invention.
  7. Nytelyte

    Nytelyte Somewhere about

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    If I understand you correctly, you are saying to simply put the copper in there for a while, and there is some form of reaction that helps to make it taste better / removes the bad flavor agents? What is happening with this?
  8. Marsh Tiger

    Marsh Tiger Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the history lesson! That certainly clarifies some things for me. Although, I'm not going to rush out and buy a case of bud. Just happy to understand a few things... :beer
  9. P B G

    P B G Long timer

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    I'm wagering that some of the off flavors are probably due to sulphur agents from a hot fermentation.

    An old trick is simply that copper in presence of some oxygen will undergo a mild reaction. Since you have those odors, and you are debating pitching the beer in whole, I would recommend trying it.

    I've heard of people stripping copper wiring as well, but I am thinking food safe product is probably the way to go.

    The reaction is assuming the odor is coming from a sulphide, which reacts with copper and drops out of suspension. Usually I would then rack off, but in a Keg I'd probably just push off a beer or two before sampling to clear out the bottom (like people who use gelatine finings in the keg)
  10. Nytelyte

    Nytelyte Somewhere about

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    I'll give it a try. That is new data to me, but like you said, if the option is to toss it, whats the harm? I'll let you know how it goes. If it works out I owe you one. :freaky
  11. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams

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    I'll be moving my rig to my new house in a few months. I converted my burners to NG from propane when moving to the basement, but I was never really happy with it. I'm going to buy some new burners and saw these.Apparently, a 10 jet burner is ample for a 12 gal. boil.

    Thoughts?
  12. P B G

    P B G Long timer

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    Just buy the damned turkey fryer.
  13. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams

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  14. P B G

    P B G Long timer

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    That makes things clearer.

    Your "rig" is not what most brewers have.

    I do propane simply because I can roll it over to the door and set it outside. I would have to run a rather large NG line out to do that.


    First thing I would do is look at the NG line, get its diameter, and how long a run it is, that should give you an idea of how much NG you can flow.

    If you exceed that in burner capacity you won't get the heat you are trying for no matter what burners you have.

    http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/natural-gas-pipe-calculator-d_1042.html

    Once you can estimate the fuel availability then you can size your burners to what they will have delivered.
  15. Dansrc51

    Dansrc51 I need a cape....

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    very good last couple of posts. Thanks for the info on the copper piping, never tried that. Saison turned out excellent. Belgium White going strong now.
  16. Lobby

    Lobby Viel Spass, Vato!

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    Interesting that "all" home brewers like ales and the heavier beers.

    Does anybody make any pilsners?
  17. Barron

    Barron M0DAH0LIC

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    I can't speak for everyone but my view on it is "bang for the buck". My challenge is to make a great beer with a high ABV. So far so good, but some friends have requested "not so strong" cause it tastes great but they can't drink that much...
  18. goosecreek

    goosecreek fed up

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    I try to brew the more expensive beers which translates to darker or high abv beer where I am..
  19. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams

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    Hmmm. Pilsner is the most difficult beer for a homebrewer to make. Well, if you're going for true to style Pilsner. There is nowhere for any defects to hide. I absolutely adore a well made pilsner. One of my favorite styles. Unfortunately, there are very few american made pilsners that are anything to shake a stick at. There is a reason why homebrewers are so successful with stout. The complete opposite.

    Southampton Public House had an unfiltered pilsner out in bottles last summer and it was amazing. Light, hoppy, refreshing, full of flavor, clean and perfect. Victory Prima Pils is great as well. This is one of the few styles that American brewers just won't nail because it takes focus and determination. I'm a pale ale guy, but I'd travel far and wide for a well made pilsner. esp. czech style.
  20. P B G

    P B G Long timer

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    Remember of course that the brewing equipment is different for ales versus lagers.

    Most homebrewers do Ales because ales ferment at more or less room temperature, maybe cellar temps if you live somewhere warm, or heated bathroom temps if you're somewhere cold. But you don't need to maintain a special "lagering" fridge to keep the yeast happy and get a good product.

    A beer like a Pilsner or really any lager beer requires that you maintain the temperature range precisely, usually at around 50 degrees or a bit less. This is warmer than most fridges will maintain, and usually you use a secondary thermostat and you turn the fridge down to full cold, then the secondary controller cycles a relay on the power outlet.

    This represents loads of additional equipment, I certainly haven't made that step, and do ales, ciders, and juice wines.