New Caponord

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by D.T., Nov 10, 2012.

  1. Celtic Curmudgeon

    Celtic Curmudgeon Indiana Jones wanabe

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    Sorry for the hijack, but is there an explanation why metric fuel consumption is quoted "liters per 100km"? I'd think that "km per liter" would be easier to relate to and convert to/from MPG. L/100km requires math skills, and I'm a social science major forfecksake... :huh
  2. JohnG.

    JohnG. Long timer

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    Agreed,ADV wire wheels version...a Tiger 800XC basher :clap
  3. Croak

    Croak Been here awhile

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    Just another thing to blame on the French. :wink:

    But seriously, there's actually three different systems for metric fuel consumption used around the world. The litre per 100km, the kilometres per litre like you suggested, and litres per mil (a mil is 10km).

    Keep in mind none of those systems were devised for easy conversion to gallons and miles, if anything it's meant to discourage the use of archaic measurements.

    Most of what makes it "hard" for people using US standards is NOT the math though, it's the memorized list of tables and relationships and experiences in your head. You just know that 20MPG is poor for a motorcycle but decent economy for a pickup truck, no math required.

    Just like you "know" that 100F is a hot day, and 70F is comfy weather, but probably too cool for a nice bath in the first case, and a shitty beer temperature in the second case. You know that 7 feet is very tall for a dude but a short for a ladder.

    Likewise, a metric user just knows that 40C is a fucking hot day and 20C is comfy, and 6L/100km isn't horrible fuel economy for a motorcycle.

    Now that I made you suffer through all that, here's the quick formula if you do want to do the math: US MPG = 235/E, where E is the litres consumed per 100km.

    So for a 6L/100km bike, it'd be 235/6=39.16 MPG. For a 9L/100km bike, 26.1 MPG, and so on.

    It's probably easier (though not accurate) if you just round 235 up to 240 for quicker rough division using those "times tables" we all learned in school. That'd give you 40MPG for the first example above, quickly putting you in the ballpark. That's good enough for the girls I go out with. :evil

    Do it often enough, and it just becomes memory. As an American, I had a crash course on metrics in the Marines so I had distances and weights down pretty good, then had full immersion when I moved to Canada years ago and picked up the rest.

    EDIT: I have a BS in Sociology myself. :)
  4. Celtic Curmudgeon

    Celtic Curmudgeon Indiana Jones wanabe

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    Thanks, Croak, that puts it in perspective. I was in ROTC and the reserve, have been an avid shooter, etc. so the metric stuff we used there I have no problem with...kilometers to miles, mms to inches, but other than knowing there's 3.8 liters in a gallon, volume measures are confusing for me, and like your reference to temperature... I know from physics that 0 C is 32F, and 100c is 212F, but in between, those, I get lost!

    Cheers
  5. Croak

    Croak Been here awhile

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    Just a matter of getting your frame of reference, and metric is a hell of a lot easier to learn in the first place, and easier to work with once you've learned it.

    Oh, for converting Celsius to Fahrenheit, the quick and dirty method is to double it and add 30, which is not super accurate and doesn't work well below freezing, but gets you in the ballpark when talking about typical weather. 20C *2+30=70F. 10C*2+30=50F.
  6. Croak

    Croak Been here awhile

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    Yet another Tor Sagen video on the Capo 1200.

    Some footage from previous videos, but a fair amount of new stuff, including more of his thoughts on actually riding the bike.

    <iframe width="853" height="480" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/pocqd7qVTS0?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  7. Croak

    Croak Been here awhile

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    And here's a bit dry and heavily-accented explanation from the Aprilia electronics lead describing ADD in more detail, and how it differs/improves on the Skyhook system:

    <iframe width="853" height="480" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/_pyrcolWrU4?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  8. Lion BR

    Lion BR I'd rather be riding

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    This guy sounds a bit pissed off with Ducati.
    So does Tor on the video above. :lol3
  9. jimmex

    jimmex Guero con moto

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    It is painful watching that Tor guy try to ride a bike.
  10. MLCavassa

    MLCavassa Monkey in a Suit

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    I was thinking the exactly the same thing. He's, well, kinda sloppy. But then again, he is following another bike whose rider seems to be having his own set of issues - not the least of which is maintaining a constant speed.
  11. Jltrd

    Jltrd Adventurer

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    It's probably going to be awhile before I can see one in person. Could you expand on the "parts bin lash up" comment? Thanks

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2
  12. Pampero

    Pampero Verbose Adventurer

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    The luggage looks very similar to what was fitted to the last generation of Capos.

    [​IMG] It works well enough in a rather pedestrian way; not the best design and something they could have improved on (I do think it's virtually the same box, right down to the cut out moldings) but if Givi build doesn't set the world on fire, there's always the option of going to the aftermarket. Something I do like about the luggage is that it is full sized on both sides, an improvement over the Multistrada's exhaust cut outs. No doubt it will be reasonably priced in the package as well. Nobody really beats BMW at this game. From outward appearances they did better with the Stelvio's package, and this one (on the new offering) probably does fit the "parts bin" description.

    But if it's a parts bin special, it really makes no difference as long as they are good parts. How many boxers get the same motor? How many Audis use the 2.0TSi? To my way of thinking, the quality of the parts they pulled from the bin will be the key as a practical matter.

    A clean sheet design would be great, but this has enough innovation and the packaging looks up to the job. If they managed some manufacturing efficiencies they pass along to the market, well and good. If not, I think your criticism will be perfectly valid.
  13. Croak

    Croak Been here awhile

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    MCN first ride:

    http://www.motorcyclenews.com/MCN/N...13/March/apr1113-aprilia-caponord-first-ride/

    As for the parts bin, beyond the panniers it has a new dash, a new suspension, new bodywork, new wheels, new tires, new subframe, new tank, new headlights, new tail lights, new seat, new exhaust, new charging system, new sensor suite, new sprockets, new handlebar and yoke, new windscreen, new electronics, and a new intake mated to a re-worked top end.

    About all it shares with the 'Duro is the trellis portion of the frame, bottom end and transmission, and some of the same switchgear shared across the Piaggio line. You'd see about the same degree of commonality between a Tiger 1050 and a Speed Triple, a R1200GS and a R1200R, etc.
  14. Moronic

    Moronic Long timer

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    I can remember finding L/100km hard to get used to but I have come to prefer it. Seems to make it easy to work out how far you can go on a tank.

    However, I'm not sure it is universally the metric format. Over in Orange Crush, where the new KTM 1190 is on sale in Europe while the rest of us wait, several helpful early adopters seem to prefer quoting km per litre.

    Back to the Caponord: it looks interesting and I like it that they have added electronic cruise. I would love to know more about how they amended the Skyhook damping program. But the auto rear preload looks to me like an expensive and complex answer to a question nobody asked.

    Which probably means I am not seeing straight. Probably, a high proportion of potential purchasers would have difficulty understanding where to set rear preload for different loads.

    OTOH, for me it is giving the bike control of something I really can control better myself.

    And probably, making me pay for that if I want other stuff that comes with the premium package. :baldy
  15. jimmex

    jimmex Guero con moto

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    Don't buy one then. "parts bin lash up" :csm
  16. JohnG.

    JohnG. Long timer

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    sit back,will be good buying a few years on...after a few recalls :wink: :ear
  17. vivo

    vivo Adventurer

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    When people say it looks like a parts bin special what does that tell you? Think on this.. a while.

    It means this bike does not SEEM genuine. It means it falls short of many enthusiasts expectations. Perceived qualities are more important than Engineeringtalk. We purchase based on how an object makes us FEEL about that object and ourselves.

    Truth is very dependent on perceived situation.

    The bike needs its own frame. This is a critical error as the frame used is too distinctively related to OTHER bikes. Parts bin is how the bike is perceived and that fault lies with Aprilia.

    I am sure its a good machine .

    Vivo
  18. jimmex

    jimmex Guero con moto

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    I don't perceive it that way. I've never laid eyes on a Dorsowhatever so wouldn't know how similar they appear. The bike is full of new interesting technology and looks really cool IMO.
  19. Croak

    Croak Been here awhile

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    Dorsoduro 1200:

    [​IMG]

    Caponord 1200

    [​IMG]

    Some family resemblance, but no worse than comparing a R1200GS to a HP2, or a Tiger 1050 to a Speed Triple, for instance.
  20. vivo

    vivo Adventurer

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    Some will love this bike for what it is. Others will look at the swing arm, main section frame, even luggage and say it seems like a model built using existing bits and that's a shame because there isn't really anything wrong with a design that builds using existing.bits as long as the end result works. But while this bike should hsve been a show stopper it might look less so to some?

    The Stelvio frame was based on the Griso yet they do not visually appear to be the same design. I think the Capo frame just looks too much like the Shiver, a bike less upmarket.

    Vivo