New Chain: Recommendations?

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by TastyPants, Oct 16, 2012.

  1. TastyPants

    TastyPants Harasshole

    Joined:
    May 23, 2009
    Oddometer:
    239
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Anyone found a decent quality chain at a reasonable price they like?

    Also curious about sprockets but I found a few I like already.
    #1
  2. Ronin ADV

    Ronin ADV Gear addict

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    615
    Location:
    Northern Sierras
    I've been happy with the RK chain I've been running for a while.
    Recently had a new 18" rear wheel built by Woodys with Supersprox. I've used these sprockets on my WR with consistently hard use and good results.
    #2
  3. toro618

    toro618 Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,027
    Location:
    NJ

    Are you using the gold Supersprox for a KTM 990?
    #3
  4. Ronin ADV

    Ronin ADV Gear addict

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    615
    Location:
    Northern Sierras
    Yep.
    #4
  5. Two Moto Kiwis

    Two Moto Kiwis Homeless Somewhere

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    Apr 12, 2007
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    Location:
    Wanaka, New Zealand, ....What Trip!!!
    #5
  6. 1994klr250

    1994klr250 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2007
    Oddometer:
    849
    Location:
    SE michigan
    I'm running a RK GB525XSO chain with OEM sprockets right now. I had this set put on in Fairbanks this past summer when my OEM chain was worn at 17k miles. I've been happy with it so far. I just ordered a replacement chain and sprockets from these guys below. I've always had good experiences with DID chains so I went with the DID 525 ZVM-X.

    http://www.sprocketcenter.com/c/265433/1/f800-gs-08-12.html
    #6
  7. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4,150
    I got over 40,000kms out of the stock chain and replaced it out of preventive maintenance. Clean it regularly and lube it religiously every 700kms or so and you are good to go.
    For the new chain I got a Regina endless and did the swingarm drop, I had not access nor chance to pick up a riveting tool locally and it would have cost me well north of $65 to have one shipped in. I have been beating the hell out of the new chain and it is doing fine. Doing the swing arm drop gives you a chance to get some well needed lube into the pivot points and is a plus side of the job. Most people ignore lubing the swing arm because their is no grease nipple. Motorrad are as cheap with grease on the swingarm as they are with the wheel bearings.
    If you go the route of a rivet chain you are looking at around $175 for a chain and tool and sprockets, I would imagine.
    If I can get 40,000kms out of the Regina I'll be happy, however I will likely sell the bike well before that. It should be possible to get well over 50,000kms out of a good set of sprockets and a quality name brand chain if you do the maintenance. I ride only on 3rd world roads full of tope speed bumps and it is constant acceleration and deceleration and rough surfaces with the odd very high speed stretch of toll highway. It's "no country for old chains".
    #7
  8. seasider

    seasider Just a rider

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2007
    Oddometer:
    716
    Location:
    Virginia
    Not to redirect this thread but what should be the deciding factor with regard to a riveted chain vs a clip?
    #8
  9. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4,150
    Valid question and here is a take on it.
    Drag bikes used clip type chains for years, as did large capacity multi cylinder bikes in the late 70's and 80's when the owners had done in the OEM endless chains as fitted to some of the bikes. Can a clip type chain handle the 75hp of the F800GS? Probably.

    Availability will be the big thing. If you are fitting an o-ring clip type chain, a chain press that costs about $8 or so is a good idea, it saves having to use the "2 10mm nuts and a pair of vice grips" or "end of a wooden hammer" method to compress the o-rings enough to get the clip on. Racers used to safety wire clips, by the way.

    You can either cut the old chain off, or use a chain breaker and then put on your new one, or you can buy the endless version and drop the swingarm and fit it on. You have to lube your swingarm some time, or at least check it, this is a good opportunity and you won't need a chain breaker or a chain press or a chain rivet staking tool so you will save yourself a fair sized bit of money. You will likely only change the chain maybe twice in the time you will own the bike if you are on top of the maintenance on the chain, see if you can borrow the chain tools from a friend unless you are serious about building up your tool kit.

    You'll probably change your cam chain once and your drive chain twice if you decide to own the bike for more than 80,000kms.
    #9
  10. seasider

    seasider Just a rider

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2007
    Oddometer:
    716
    Location:
    Virginia
    Thanks Mike mike. I have wondered since owning the bike but never had the applicable chance to ask. Clips on my dirt bikes and I do own a chain breaker but the swingarm lube issue makes a good argument.
    #10