New guy here saying hello......

Discussion in 'Alaska' started by crashmaster, Apr 1, 2011.

  1. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Hi folks.I have just found that when I return to work later this year, I will be relocated to Anchorage.

    I have a couple of bikes I could bring. The KTM 990 that I have been riding in Latin America for the past couple of years, and a KTM 450, my Baja bike.

    Do you have any trail riding suitable for a big bike near Anchorage, or suitable for the 450 as well? My guess is that summer is full of quads and mud, so I am just not sure to what to expect about the riding and the access issues.

    Would it be worth it to bring either of these bikes to Anchorage, or should I just embrace the snow and find myself with a new snow machine this winter instead.

    In any case, I look forward to meeting some of YFF's later this year.

    Saludos.
    #1
  2. Skyd1v

    Skyd1v ABSRA Co-Co-Founder

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    The Alaska ATV Club - while mostly geared for ATV's - doesn't discriminate against bikes and could point you towards a number of trails to ride either of those machines on. I myself take the KLR out to the Jim Creek area (miles upon miles of trails) several times a summer. Seen plenty of other bikes out there as well.

    From the areas I have ridden off road around here, you can pretty much find any type of trail you want to ride. From "pleasant path through the trees" to "River-fjording, basketball sized rock filled mud pit."

    And there are a number of inmates that stud up the tires, dress warm, and keep going past the freezing point. It's all good.

    /blue skies
    #2
  3. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Gracias amigo. Guess I should bring both the 990 and 450. Hopefully I will be done with training before it gets too cold this fall, or else I will be studding the tires just to get a fix. I'm not big into droning along a wide graded road so the trails will be more my speed, on either bike.

    However, it sounds like you can really get properly lost with a snow machine, so there will be one of those in my future I imagine. Do they let you put a license plate on just about anything in Alaska (like a 2 stroke) or has the Sierra Club put an end to that?
    #3
  4. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

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    I've been riding here since... forever. :deal There used to be lots of trails. Not anymore.
    Name some of these trails you are talking about that are within 10-15 miles of Anchorage.
    #4
  5. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Oooh. Thats not what I wanted to hear. Fookin hell, I wish Alaska was closer to the Mexican border. Youre bumming me out right now an thats sayin something since I am in the land of Happiness, Colombia! Damn, because of that I have to go see my relaxation therapist again tonight.
    #5
  6. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

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  7. Skyd1v

    Skyd1v ABSRA Co-Co-Founder

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    Well, I don't recall saying within 10-15 miles. Normally my trail riding is done over by Jim Creek (about 45 miles), some of the access trails between KGB and Big Lake (about 55 miles, and you gotta be careful about accidentally trespassing), or there are a bunch of trails of varying difficulty up by Sutton. (About 70 miles)

    So, yeah, not seeing where I said 10-15 miles. When I first moved up here in the 80s you could get away with riding back around Kincaid, but not even that anymore.

    /blue skies
    #7
  8. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

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    You didn't & I didn't claim you did. Just trying to keep it clear & you have now done that.
    From Anchorage to those places you mentioned ya gotta hit a fair amount of slab first. Not really something you might do on a daily basis like we used to be able to do right here in town on an unlicensed dirt bike. Right out my driveway & from one side of town to the other. Day after day after day, all summer long.
    #8
  9. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Didnt mean to piss you off man. :huh I would rather stay where I'm at near the Mexican border and not move to Alaska, but I dont have a choice in the matter.
    #9
  10. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

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    Should have mentioned that this was up to about the mid 70s.
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  11. Skyd1v

    Skyd1v ABSRA Co-Co-Founder

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    Which is why I have a KLR. Slab to trail and back - it don't care. Since he mentioned he has a KTM990, he shouldn't have any trouble at all doing same.

    The "Baka bike" would need transport though...
    #11
  12. Tom S

    Tom S Can I ride it?

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    All true. But the KLR & his big KTM aren't really all that great on the kind of trails I'm thinking of.
    #12
  13. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Got a YZ 250 I can slab to the real trails. Thats is if all those f'ing people that moved there didnt already fuck it up. :lol3
    #13
  14. Skyd1v

    Skyd1v ABSRA Co-Co-Founder

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    Well, now, we both seem to be on the same frequency at last. True, I have to pick my trails carefully. A 500 pound bike (more like 600 with all the gee-gaws hung on it) can be...challenging.

    So, there it is Crashmaster, a little bit more defined. Easy trails you can ride to, or more challenging terrain that you have to transport a machine to.

    Out of curiosity, I am guessing the baja bike is for sand dunes? We have something similar, only the dunes are at the base of glaciers and the "sand" is powdered rock. Fun on an atv, not so much on a klr.:rofl
    #14
  15. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Not many dunes in Baja. Lotsa rocks that turns into high speed sand, back to rocks, repeat until you run out of land or crash. :lol3 I'm gonna miss that place, badly, no more day rides to Mikes......:cry My 450 eats up highway miles just fine as well.
    #15
  16. marbee40

    marbee40 Some Fear is Good

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    Crashmaster,
    Bring both the 450 and the 990. You'll run out of fun for the 250 in a big hurry. Your 450 will go damn near anywhere the 250 will anyways (and I'm ASSuMING it's plated????

    I came up in '06 permanently (originally '86-87). Brought up my XR650 (WarPig) which was my Baja bike. Used it in the dez for years, to include prerunning from Loreto to La Paz, etc. Been all over SoCal, mostly Ocotillo Wells out to Salton Sea and everything in between. Rode that heavy bitch like a 450 and never regretted it. Love the speed and challenge of hammering whoops at full tilt, trying not to eat it with the blood pumping. You won't truly find much of THAT up here, but the challenges are different.

    Jim Creek (45 miles out): I've put gobs of miles on the XR out there. Lots of fun with a few water crossings that might slow you down (Jim, Friday, and Metal Creek respectively) with about 30 miles of fast stretches of open wash to hammer it in. The dinosaur eggs (rocks) seem to be a little more prevalent with less sand that baja, but still good fun. The payoff for a full Jim Creek ride is poking a tire onto the glacier if you're man enough to get there in one piece (CHALLENGE!).

    Eureka (130 miles out): Loads of challenging trails in an open (few tree's) environment more suited to ATV's in the summer and sleds (snow-machines/mobiles) in the winter. BUT a careful rider who doesn't mind honking the throttle a bit can have a ton of fun for up to two days out there! The occasional caribou herd can usually get within glassing distance.

    Hatcher Pass/Burma Road/Pt. Mackenzie (sp) (60 miles): Real nice gravel roads with occasional off-shoot for a bit of adventure. You can do this easy on your 990 and set a heart quickening pace in some areas. Easy 3/4 day total.

    LONG DISTANCE EPIC RIDES:
    Anchorage to Inuvik, Canada (2500 miles): Did this last year w/ Kilo Sierra. Took the WarPig (XR) after kitting it out w/ geezer-glide essentials (wind-screen, bags, bigger tank, etc). Your 990 would be the PERFECT bike for a cross between comfort and throttle hammering gravel that will remind you of the fun you had in Baja. Lots of asphalt from Anchorage to Tok but the views are breathtaking. After Tok it's roughly 80% gravel on well graded roads. IF you have dry weather, you can do it from Wasilla in 4 days. (Add 1/2 a day more from Anchorage). Top-of-the-World Hwy and The Demptser Hwy are tags to search for.

    The Haul Road to the tippy top of AK. (Sorry, haven't done it yet). Plenty to read about on this website. Again, definitely 990 material.

    When living in SoCal, I was in Chula (Vista) Juana, a short 30 minutes from the border. By the time you actually got through the border and past Ensenada, you still had a minimum 2-3 hours into your trip. All the wide-open riding and cool people that weren't trying to rob or kill you were an honest 1/2 day ride away. Don't let the lack of "15 minute rides" dissuade you from coming up with your machines! Bring them both or you will find yourself pissed off and wishing you had brought them!!!!! Don't say I didn't tell you so! I'm soooo glad I brought the ol' WarPig up! But, that being said, I finally got a big boy bike that doesn't feel like a 2x6 wedged in ass after 200 miles....Die Hundin (R1150GSA).

    Look forward to riding with a fellow dez rat! Give a shout via PM when you get here!
    #16
  17. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Man thats great stuff to hear from a fellow desert rider. :clap I will be sure to look you up so you can show me around. Thanks man. :freaky

    guess I need to put some heated grips on the 450. :lol3
    #17
  18. Cubdriver

    Cubdriver Stampede Swimmer

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    I agree with Marbee. Lots of unique stuff to hit, even if it is not like it was in the 60s or 70s. I wouild add to his list the Denali Highway and a ride to Manley Hot Springs. Have not done the ride to Kennicott yet, but it is a great one I am led to believe. Done the Dalton to Prudhoe Bay twice and it is an unforgettable ride also. Bring em both if you can! See you this summer. Oh, and save a little cash for the snowmachine. For 8 months, that is the main riding we have to do. Manana. Dick
    #18
  19. marbee40

    marbee40 Some Fear is Good

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    Hmmm, yeah but money was better spent on them damn ear plugs wired to my music to drown out the drone of my BigGun and Kilo Sierra screaming "SLOW THE **** DOWN, we still have 1000 miles to go!" :dj :D:poser
    #19
  20. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    :lol3 My 450 is spooky quiet. I can sneak up on just about anyone. The dudes guarding the pot farms in Mexico are always surprised when I turn up at their gate. :evil
    #20