New Guy with R100R

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by backfill, Oct 5, 2012.

  1. R100LT

    R100LT Chasing 11

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    633
    Location:
    Donnybrook Western Australia
    Talk about a Purple discount ... Damn the thing could have hot pink or baby shit yellow and I would have jumped at it at that price
    #21
  2. Bill Harris

    Bill Harris Confirmed Curmudgeon

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2008
    Oddometer:
    9,746
    Location:
    backwoods Alabama
    I just did a top-end on mine so it's nice and dry. But in 5 years they may be seeping or weeping and I'll simply regard that as "the patina of loving use".
    #22
  3. supershaft

    supershaft because I can

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2010
    Oddometer:
    9,116
    Location:
    San Francisco Bay area
    Bluethumbs advice is only for the early '70's models that have a seal crush ring that is not brazed solid on the tube. Using that tool and method on your bike will move the entire pushrod tube if it doesn't break the crush rings brazed joint to the tube and likely cause a leak at the other end of the tube where it interference fits into the cylinder.

    I re-sealed my '92 R100 when I first got it with 28,000 miles. It was leaking from everywhere. 12 years and a lot of hard miles later I had a timing cover gasket start to weep for a creeping gasket and a head gasket that started to leak oil. My pushrod seals and oil pan gaskets have never even weeped on either my '83 or '92 airheads and I got the '83 brand new!

    Use a layer of Dirko spread very thin with a flat exacto blade on the cylinder base. Use just a dab on the cylinder stud O-rings and make sure they haven't fallen down on the studs right before the cylinder gets snugged up to the case. Gaskets and pushrod seals clean and dry. Scotchbrite pad remove the mold release from the pushrod tube seals inside and out and install them dry is my best advise. I very lightly lube the cylinder O-rings before I put them on the cylinders. Borrow a good inch pound torque wrench for the clean and dry sump gasket. Go round and round until they all click tight at the same time. Retorque your heads AND sump gasket after three or four heat cycles. Then check the torque on your sump bolts about once a year. IMO, checking the head torque every 24,000 miles is plenty enough. Don't back them off. Just check them and tighten them if they need it.

    Spline lube? That is the clutch splines. It's a complete waste of time IMO unless your clutch is grabby from the bike setting for some years. Other than that it will not make your splines last longer in my expereince. As a professional beemer wrench I have seen tons of bikes never get their splines lubed and not be any worse for it. I have also seen many a regularly lubed spline let loose. Plus, there is a good chance of it making your clutch slip for putting too much lube on! That or having your drive shaft bolts come loose for not tightening them properly. I have seen it many times over. Personally, decades and hundreds of thousands of miles into it I lube mine when I am in there for something else which sometimes can be a LONG time.

    Hard starting? Make sure your choke cables are pulling the choke levers all the way to their stops and use full choke. I highly recommend sealing the choke and throttle cable junction boxes with electrical shrink insualtion tubing. It keeps the road grime out of those boxes perfectly. Good luck!
    #23
  4. backfill

    backfill Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2012
    Oddometer:
    63
    Location:
    Ancaster, Ontario
    Thanks all for your helpful suggestions. You have given me lots to ponder and do for the coming winter.

    Mark - i agree with your comments about BMWs not being "cheap" rides. I am not concerned about maintenance costs, my comment was directed more towards major engine and driveline failure that I hope stays away. But that was why I bought an airhead. With proper maintenance it should last a long time.

    cheers,
    Phil
    #24
  5. backfill

    backfill Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2012
    Oddometer:
    63
    Location:
    Ancaster, Ontario
    It was suggested that I get a Clymer manual for Barney, but I am having a bit of an issue figuring out which one.

    There is not one specifically for the 1992 R100R. The closest one I can see is the Clymer BMW Repair Manual M5023, but it does not mention the 90s R100R, just the RS and RT. Is this the right one?

    thanks in advance,
    Phil

    #25
  6. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
    Oddometer:
    12,366
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Md
    The after market manuals are not published for one year. The publishers are trying to sell as many of any one book as they can so these manuals will have a lot of stuff you don't need and some stuff you do need won't be in them.

    I just picked up my Clymers manual, off the floor, and notice it is only a three digit issue, M502. Maybe there are others? Mine is a second edition, 5th printing, September, 1999. It is the black cover with a Silver R90/6 on the cover. It says it covers model years 1970-1994. I guess that's enough. Mine does not say what models with in those years but I didn't look very far into it.

    You might have an issue with a manual that doesn't cover some of the specific gear on an R100R. Aren't those just a couple of years and they have Para Lever drive shafts or some other weirdness?

    Mine does have Para Lever drive shafts.

    Things like carburetors. The manuals don't show you an explode diagram of every different model. Just in CVs there are three different tops and two different ways of attaching jet needles. And forget finding diagrams of early /5 enrichners.

    I have the Clymers, Haynes and BMW Shop Manuals. I also have an older Clymers, with the red /7 on the cover. The old one says it is edition M309. Published in '83. It goes up to 1982 models.

    Do the best you can selecting one, get at least one manual, Clymers is a good choice, but no manual will cover everything.
    #26
  7. R100RT Mark

    R100RT Mark Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2011
    Oddometer:
    312
    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    Sometimes owning a R100R feels like being a "redheaded stepchild". Great bike, but produced toward the end of the airhead era and in the minority both in contempoary terms and when it comes to overall airhead volumes. Means digging a little deeper in available literature and a little caution when following mass "convention airhead wisdom" the generic Clymer and Haynes are what you need. Be careful to check their later model specific notes, although much of these are directed toward the GS models.
    #27
  8. red bud

    red bud alky w/motorcycle problem

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    8,227
    Location:
    jaw ja
    i like it, i picked it up at a swapmeet for 10$ so that makes me like it more

    but i've offen thought the parabellum scout like u have would be the way to go
    #28
  9. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
    Oddometer:
    12,366
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Md
    Be on the look out for a Hannigan. Bill Harris posted a picture of his bike with the newly installed Hannigan in your thread, post #16. These are still in production and they show up used. There are two versions of the Hannigan normally seen. The ST, which Bill has, more common, and the smaller one, forget the name.

    Try to get one as complete as possible. But parts for them are available.
    #29
  10. red bud

    red bud alky w/motorcycle problem

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    8,227
    Location:
    jaw ja
    i am looking for a easy on&off passenger backrest if anybody knows of one
    #30
  11. 97oilhead

    97oilhead Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2008
    Oddometer:
    189
    Location:
    Southern Ontario, Canada
    I find the Corbin works good one bolt and its off. Have you looked for a used Corbin backrest for your seat?
    #31
  12. garyinalt

    garyinalt Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2008
    Oddometer:
    83
    Location:
    Woodstock, GA
    Just thought I would add that the fairing is actually made by Parabellum. They are still available and mount easily. The only drawback is there is not enough room for instruments like the 'S' fairing from BMW.
    #32
  13. 97oilhead

    97oilhead Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2008
    Oddometer:
    189
    Location:
    Southern Ontario, Canada
    The Parabellum Scout on the '84 R100S wannabe, I had had the gauges and ignition mounted. Maybe the styling has changes a bit, but the front looks exactly the same. For some reason I have offended the Airhead gods and am not longer able to attach images.
    #33
  14. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
    Oddometer:
    12,366
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Md
    You have to host your own images because the old way used to much band width. Go to this thread and read how to post images.

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=919
    #34
  15. red bud

    red bud alky w/motorcycle problem

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    8,227
    Location:
    jaw ja
    now has a russell on it, that's why i'm needing the backrest :D
    #35
  16. jackd

    jackd Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,532
    Location:
    The Island

    Nice bike you got there. It's giving me inspiration to look for a low mileage late model R or a Mystic up in this area and throwing an 'S' fairing on it. Keep the pictures coming.
    #36
  17. Uncle Pollo

    Uncle Pollo Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    50,698
    Location:
    Albuquerque, Neue Messico
    I hate you
    #37
  18. lucky6600

    lucky6600 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2010
    Oddometer:
    968
    Location:
    CT USA
    I am in the process of picking up one next week and wondering why the 92' R100R "only" has 60 HP as I was reading?
    #38
  19. nhmaf

    nhmaf Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Oddometer:
    124
    Location:
    Barnstead, New Hampshire USA
    All the R100 bikes from the mid-late 80s until the end of the production had 'only' 60 HP - these were tuned to produce more torque at lower RPMs with the trade off of peak HP, which was generally at a higher RPM that few used anyways.
    The late 80s/early90s bike, while lower in peak HP, are smoother running R100 engines that the late70s/early 80s engines. I wish I had my '88 R100RT again. My 1978 R100/7 isn't a bad bike, but it definitely isn't quite as smooth on the highway, though it is properly tuned up.
    #39
  20. 97oilhead

    97oilhead Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2008
    Oddometer:
    189
    Location:
    Southern Ontario, Canada
    My 2000 R1200C only has 61 HP, but a lot more torque than my R100R.:D

    The R100R is a great Airhead you will love it
    #40