New Owners - Stupid Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by HighFive, Nov 22, 2010.

  1. machinebuilder

    machinebuilder Long timer

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    East Tennessee

    Maybe I should rephrase my comment.

    For the riding I do here in East TN, there are much better tires available than the scorpions. YMMV
  2. 4TooMany

    4TooMany Been here awhile

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    I wouldn't expect much. I personally believe that the only reason BMW puts street-oriented tires on the bike is for the lawyers. In the brochure I have for the 2012 F800GS, there is only one picture of the stock tires. All of the other pictures of the bike show some kind of more off-road oriented tires. And that's a BMW brochure! I think the brochure is BMW's way of saying: "Sorry, the lawyers made us do it". The TKC80s or the Heidenaus are still good enough on the road, and they're WAY better off. I had the dealer swap the tires before I even picked up the bike.

    Oh, here's the rather cool brochure: http://www.bmw-motorrad.co.uk/media/pdf/F-800-GS-Brochure.pdf
  3. peripateo

    peripateo Adventurer

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    Well my bike is a 2012 and I'm not sure what type of tires come on it maybe Battlewings? (I will be picking it up next weekend). So how many miles can I expect to get out of those tires before I need to replace them?
  4. tofire409

    tofire409 Geared up and ready.

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    How much weight are you carrying? How heavy on the throttle are you? How hot is it where you ride? Lots of variables to your question...

    Some guys only get 5000km's out of a set of TKC'S (for comparison), I'm going on 7000km's (TKC's) and still have a good amount of tread left.

    So I would expect at least 15,000 km's if not more on the BMW supplied street tires.
  5. fiwi

    fiwi Been here awhile

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    Hello all. My time for the stupid questions. Could someone please tell me the amount of oil required for the front forks please. I think I read somewhere that it is about 760ml. I am assuming that is for one fork, is that right?.

    Secondly, I want to put a DID chain on my bike. Apparently I need a DID specific tool to break the chain and to rivet it back together. Are these two separate tools or is it one tool that does both jobs?. Thanks
  6. vtbob

    vtbob wanderer

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    There are several chain breaking/repair tools on the market. Some do both functions. Becarefull of the cheapest ones. They may not be up to the task...or worst case not do a good job properly deforming the rivit heads for good long term operation/safety.
  7. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    I find it easier to get the air gap correct. BMW recommends fill to 60mm from the top, with the spring out and the fork collapsed. The air cushion is to prevent the fork from bottoming as oil will not compress and air will. It is not set in cement, tune it to your weight. Lighter riders can use a larger gap. Aftermarket springs may recommend a larger gap. Hyper pro recommends 120mm.

    I need to get chain tool. For years I just sawed the old chain off. A grinder with a cutting blade does it. For putting a rivet type master link on, I use vice grip pliers. If you have a BB gun, a copper BB, a little grease to stick it to the rivet and squeeze.
  8. RexBuck

    RexBuck Long timer

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    This is a bit of the blind leading the blind. I just bought my first DID chain from The Sproket Center - great people to deal with and have good props from other inmates here. Asked them which chain tool was the best - recommended the RK tool.
  9. asordo

    asordo n00b

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    Here's one, why when you shift from neutral to first gear, like when you are at a red light, the gearbox makes a metalic noise, like if the clutch was not working properly?, But if you shift to second instead of first the noice is much less? (I'm sure the clutch is working fine by the way).

    One more, how you know when is time to change the chain, when it starts to become loose frequenlty?

    Thanks!
  10. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    1) Actually I've never tried shifting into 2nd at a light.... :lol3 I'm going to go do that in just a minute to see...
    But ... the clutch on most bikes is a "wet" clutch meaning it bathed in engine oil, and as such there is some residual engagement between the plates due to the oil film leading to a bit more clunking than you would get with a dry clutch.

    2) Yes - One of the signs of of a chain that is reaching end of life it the need for frequent adjustment.
    Frequent lubrication or one of the oiling systems can extend the chain life by quite a lot.
    A quick check is to try to pull the chain away from the rear sprocket at about the 9 o'clock position and if more than 1/2 of a tooth is exposed you are likely on the way out...
    There are more sophisticated ways to measure wear as well ... one of them is to get the chain tight and measure the length of certain number of links of chain and compare that to the new dimension for that number of links If the wear exceeds 1% - 2% ... it's likely goning to be toast soon if it isn't already...
    I'm sure there are some different opinions on measureing wear, but the answer to your question is "yes" as a chain reaches end of life it will need adjustment much more frequently.
  11. Hookapelli

    Hookapelli Meat Popsicle

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    Buddy of mine has 25k miles on his chain using this:

    http://bolty.net/2009/05/13/dupont-teflon-lube-is-magic-brought-to-you-by-science/

    His chain and sprocket still look new and shows no sign of needing replaced.

    I've been using it every 500-600 miles and I'm at 12k miles with no sign of ware on chain or sprocket.
  12. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    I have 28K miles on my OEM chain.
    I think I've only adjusted the tension 4 times and I can't as yet pull any slack between the chain and rear sprocket.

    I keep it clean and lube it frequently (at the end of every day while on the road) with synthetic 90W transmission oil applied sparingly with a toothbrush while the bike is on the centerstand. The DID rep. recommended this to me many years back and it seems to work so I keep doing it.
  13. peripateo

    peripateo Adventurer

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    Tire pressure: when on the road should I maintain the tire pressure that is listed in the BMW owners manual or what is on the side of the actual tire? My new bike has the Perrelli scorpions and they say maybe 42 or 46? Bike manual recommends much lower. Thanks!
  14. HappyHighwayman

    HappyHighwayman Been here awhile

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    I have the same tires and it doesn't say 42 or 46 as far as I remember. How much do you weigh? Do you ride two-up?

    I usually run 34/36 but the dealer pumps them higher. Higher pressure gives you longer tire life but less grip. You can experiment around. Just make sure they're not too low.
  15. peripateo

    peripateo Adventurer

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    They say max load 715 lbs at 42 psi cold.

    Anyway, is there a trick to getting the bike up on the BMW center stand? Or am I just that weak?
  16. murdock84

    murdock84 Been here awhile

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    My F800GS Trophy was my first bike with a center stand as well. See the below link.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDNqCMNau9A
  17. sorebutt

    sorebutt Long timer

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    That is max pressure and load listed on the side of the tire. The owners manual gives a range of pressure, depending on load and the type of riding you are doing. Plus different tires work better with different pressures.

    Some people swear by always using higher pressure for longer tire wear, but I find that that wears the center of the tire faster, especially on knobby tires.
  18. sorebutt

    sorebutt Long timer

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    I find it goes on pretty easy. The problem most people have is they are trying to lift the bike. You should be pushing down with your leg. Just push down as hard as you can with your leg and use your arm to pull the bike back so you rock the bike onto the stand.
  19. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    Make sure both sides of the stand are flat on the ground when you start. It was a pain at first because I had more weight on one side than the other. It is easier to access the foot lever if you lift up the passenger peg. I grab the close side bar of the passenger peg and lift up while pushing down on the foot lever.
  20. Oz_Gordo

    Oz_Gordo Adventurer

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