New rider - Ride home from dealership? (pic included!)

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by opticalmace, Mar 10, 2013.

  1. opticalmace

    opticalmace Been here awhile

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    edit: I got it delivered, have put on 500 miles and for me it was the right decision! Update on page 2.

    Hello,

    I am a new Canadian rider. I took the safety course last August and passed. I wasn't able to purchase a bike in the fall but I recently found a nice deal on a 2012 Ninja 250R at a local dealership recommended by a friend of mine.

    The dealership is about a 30-minute drive away. My friend (who rides) thinks I should just jump in the deep end and ride it home. I am open to it but I figured I would ask for your opinions. :ear The other option would be getting the shop to deliver it for me to my home.

    The shop is in the countryside a bit (60km/h speed limit), but I would have to drive on some 2-lane city roads on the way home. I live in the family housing of a university so there is a bit of traffic near my home anyway. It is not obvious to me which is best.

    Should I just ride it home or get it delivered? I have all of my safety gear. Thanks!

    P.S. I know you guys love pictures so here she is: :clap

    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. abnslr

    abnslr rides a motorcycle

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    If you're comfortable riding it home from the dealership then do so. You've got to start riding it on the street at some point after all.
    #2
  3. jesse v

    jesse v Motorcyclist

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    If you're smart enough to have all your riding gear already, smart enough to have taken your safety course, and smart enough to start out with a 250cc bike... Then I'd say you're smart enough to ride it home.

    :clap
    #3
  4. tedder

    tedder irregular

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    Yup.

    Well done on starting on a proper sized bike. That puts you ahead of many/most male riders, it appears.
    #4
  5. damurph

    damurph Cold Adventurer

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    Smart looking bike for a smart rider. One can assume you know somebody that rides and can carry you out to the dealer on their bike. Then you have a riding buddy to follow all the way home.

    PS...take the long way home.:clap
    #5
  6. Skyway6

    Skyway6 Adventurer

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    well i want to add that op is in Ontario. it is winter there, recently had a huge snow storm. Add in new rider, cold tires/new tires and street with possible ice/snow patches. Then there is all the snow melt/road grime/salt that will get into all the shiney underbits of that bike. if they are offering to deliver bike i would take that option.
    #6
  7. concours

    concours WFO for 41 years

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    Road salt is not friendly to motorcycles. Even dry and dusty, it clings and will begin the corrosion....
    #7
  8. the_sandman_454

    the_sandman_454 Been here awhile

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    In mid-late spring through early fall, I would suggest doing some familiarization in the parking lot and once you feel comfortable with it, ride it home.

    Given that it is March, and you're in Canada, I would not do it unless you've recently had some rain to clear the salt crap from the road, and you're getting some unseasonably warm temperatures so the pavement is a bit warmer. See if they'll either deliver it, or hold it for you 'til April/May (whenever it warms up a bit and rains the road salt/contaminants away). Even then, be careful on the new tires, they can be a little slick at first.

    Nice bike, btw, that should serve you well, get good mpg, and be entertaining to boot. A bike doesn't have to have a ton of HP to leave a big grin on your face.
    #8
  9. Skyway6

    Skyway6 Adventurer

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    Well, generally speaking, March and Canada are not good riding times. but here we can usually ride year round. While the SoCal riders will probably disagree but temps are 10c/50f here and great riding as long as it is sunny. Which being here (in a temperate rain forest) and winter it rains almost every day.

    and ps. yes. congrats op on new bike. nice colour. (color for you yanks :) )
    i picked up a CBR250r in Oct 2011. Still having fun but looking at a new ride for 2014.

    oh and yes it is warm here compared to rest of Canada. even have palm trees. (google street view pic as proof :) http://goo.gl/maps/P1v3A )
    #9
  10. duck

    duck Banned

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    If the last time you rode was when you took the class then you might want to consider having it delivered (if it's free) or having a buddy who rides ride it home for you.

    But it really gets down to how confident you feel in your riding skills so, in the end, it's up to you.
    #10
  11. SoSlow

    SoSlow Having fun

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    Nice machine!

    When I bought my first bike, the only riding I had under my belt was the course. I wasn't comfortable at all riding it home (truck routes, etc) so I swallowed my pride and asked a buddy of mine with a ton of experience to ride it home for me. The next day was a Saturday - I took some side roads and spent the better part of the day riding around empty roads and empty parking lots just to get used to it.

    Another thing I'd consider is the cold/salt/sand factor. Nothing like seeing rust spring up overnight to put a damper on things. :waysad
    #11
  12. opticalmace

    opticalmace Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the suggestions guys. You're right, I was going to wait for the weather to warm up a bit and rain to wash off the salt (hopefully before April, but I can wait until then if need be).

    And yeah, haven't ridden since the course in August, but I picked it up pretty quickly at the time. I'll have to ponder it a bit.

    I appreciate the feedback. :thumb
    #12
  13. filmfan

    filmfan Been here awhile

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    In addition to what has been stated, I'd add;
    How familiar are you with the roads and traffic between your home and the dealer? And what choices might you have for the route?

    What I am getting at is that traffic on various roads tends to have it's own rhythm, if you are used to driving those roads then you'll know what to expect when you're in the unfamiliar situation of driving the bike.
    OTH, if the road is new to you, and the bike is new to you, and riding any bike is new to you, then you may want to consider other methods of getting it home. Doesn't have to be delivery, could be riding along with someone experienced, who is willing to let you set your pace.

    It's easy to minimalize your situation, but there is a big difference between taking the class, then getting on your bike, in real traffic for the first time. Even though all of us have BTDT, it's different for everybody.

    No matter what you decide though, good on you for thinking about it:clap
    #13
  14. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    RIDE RIDE RIDE :ricky
    #14
  15. feathered

    feathered Been here awhile

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    Ride it. Isn't that what you bought it for? Get a friend (car or bike) to follow you.

    It also sounds like the country roads around the dealer could be better for your first warm up than traffic around a university.
    #15
  16. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    Get it delivered.

    A new rider on a new bike (a bike that is new to YOU) is in one of the highest statistical categories for getting crunched (next to being intoxicated).

    You want to be absolutely familiar with every control on the machine...not fumbling or having to look. You want to be in excellent practice with your emergency braking---maximum stopping without losing control.

    Some parking lot sessions will build and hone the skills you need to survive on the street. Get a 12 pack of soda and set up a cone course for yourself made out of cans. Practice your low speed skills. Practice with all the controls. Do braking practice runs. Evaluate your level of confidence. When you feel really pretty confident on it, then hit the street.

    Some red duct tape, or better, the heavy cloth tape stucco people use, on strategic points on the faring will save some scrapes when, not if, you drop it. (often in your driveway or garage.) Take it off later and remove any goo with alcohol.

    Playing it conservative will never hurt you. Playing it too bold very well might. Plenty of time for boldness later.

    Also, practice sitting on it in the garage and making engine noises when it's too nasty out to ride. Or sit on it an watch race videos. We all do :rofl
    #16
  17. wtjBatman

    wtjBatman Adventurer

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    Assuming the roads aren't filfthy, just ride it. You took the course, you are more prepared than a lot of new riders. And you won't learn to ride until you actually ride it in a variety of conditions.

    Also not sure why some people insist you absolutely will drop your bike. I started on a ninja 250, it was a great choice over a larger bike, and I never dropped it or crashed or any of those things some people insist will happen. On a larger bike now, still havent dropped it. Im glad I didnt have anyone telling me negative things when I started riding. Be smart and careful, but most of all have fun riding! That's the point!
    #17
  18. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    You're special. Most people drop them at some point.

    "negative things" includes things like getting dead. Far too many riders do. It's not like the worst thing is a broken leg. One of my early riding mentors cautioned me that if I always thought about the dangers, I wouldn't have fun. If I didn't think about them enough, I wouldn't have fun either. It's a balancing act. You can have plenty of fun in a parking lot working on your skills.
    #18
  19. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    You're special. Most people drop them at some point.

    "negative things" includes things like getting dead. Far too many riders do. It's not like the worst thing is a broken leg. One of my early riding mentors cautioned me that if I always thought about the dangers, I wouldn't have fun. If I didn't think about them enough, I wouldn't have fun either. It's a balancing act. You can have plenty of fun in a parking lot working on your skills. part of being smart is managing that balancing act.


    After 34+ years of riding, I still do parking lot time with a new bike. In the spring after a winter of not riding, I do backroads time and practice emergency stops. Then I don't think about it a lot. My reflexes are tuned up, time to just enjoy the ride.
    #19
  20. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    Actually "most" don't.

    The "It's not if but when..." is an often parroted MYTH.
    #20