New road surface in the neighborhood--anybody have any experience?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by melville, Sep 25, 2013.

  1. melville

    melville Long timer

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    I'm told that something called Slurry Seal will be applied to most of the roads in my neighborhood, starting tomorrow. Is this the urban version of Chip Seal?
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  2. crofrog

    crofrog Long timer

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    Just feel it out. I'd not be worried about it. Then feel it out again the first time it rains.

    Besides how fast are you going in your hood
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  3. Gripsteruser

    Gripsteruser Service Monkey

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  4. Shooplick

    Shooplick Adventurer

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    pics in the link above look like 20 grit sandpaper. don't fall!
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  5. IDRider

    IDRider Been here awhile

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    The slurry seal is a mixture of an emulsified asphalt, portland cement, and a fine aggregate, usually 1/4" or less.

    The machine will spread the slurry out in a layer 1/4" - 3/8" thick. Once it sets up (2 - 6 hours) it will look like fresh pavement to you. It will have a far smoother surface than a chip seal.

    I prefer slurry seals over chip seals in residential areas.
    #5
  6. viverrid

    viverrid not dead yet

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    Chip & Slurry Seal, brother & sister....
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  7. Wdwrkr

    Wdwrkr Long timer

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    1/4" to 3/8" really... Wow that would never hold up to frost heaves
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  8. viverrid

    viverrid not dead yet

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    Nothing you lay over the top holds down a frost heave. It's not like they are placing some kind of hard shell the holds down heaves.

    Laying something over the top to seal the surface to prevent water from getting into the road in the first place can help prevent frost heaves from forming, if the base/sub base are well drained..
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  9. melville

    melville Long timer

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    Yeah, frost heaves not a problem here.

    It looks like they're using the microsurfacing process. It is just neighborhood streets, but that includes a hard right turn in the middle of a 15% down grade for nearly every ride I do. Treading carefully for a while, then.

    Tomorrow we've got to move the cages and bike out beyond the work area before they start, or we'll be pedestrians only for the day.

    They've been doing some different processes around here lately--many of the concrete decked bridges got resurfaced with a resin that holds a coarse sand aggregate. I was leery at first, but it seems to be holding up fine. And yes, Shooplick, it looks a lot like 12 grit sandpaper! It smelled like a fiberglass shop while they were doing it.
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  10. Wdwrkr

    Wdwrkr Long timer

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    I fricken love this place :D. I learn something everyday. Since we are both from Mass I'm sure you can understand why frost heave came to mind
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  11. melville

    melville Long timer

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  12. Chip Seal

    Chip Seal Long timer

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    The county did our residential streets with slurry seal this August. It's basically the tar in tar snakes mixed with gravel. It's a "budget" fix. It's a freeking mess for a week as they don't roll it. The cars push the gravel to center and edges like on a gravel road. Cornering might be slippery because of the loose gravel.
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  13. rocker59

    rocker59 diplomatico di moto

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    Here, "slurry seal" only has silica sand. No gravel. It's used primarily as a sealer for parking lots and residential streets. It's also referred to as "seal coating".

    "Chip & Seal" has 1/4" granite gravel. It's used to add a wear course to State highways.
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  14. DirtyOldMan

    DirtyOldMan Long timer

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    Yes, and they are dishonest. They are gravel, pretending to be pavement.
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