New (to Me) 2000 Kawasaki W650

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by The Jerk, Oct 11, 2009.

  1. Kentucky

    Kentucky Long timer

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    One more pic:

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    #21
  2. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    What rack is that for the side cases? The Five Stars rack?
    #22
  3. RENCRN8

    RENCRN8 Been here awhile

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    Oh my :eek1 that sir is perfect. Thank You!
    #23
  4. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    So I was looking for a luggage rack for the W650 and in doing some research, it seems there's not much out there, which is no big surprise as this bike was not exactly a top seller.

    The two principal options that I found are the Five Stars rack carried by TwistedThrottle (about $220) and the Ventura system which is primarily intended to mount their line of soft luggage.

    The Five Stars rack has an optional hardware kit that fits Givi Monokey cases, one of which I just so happen to have as a top case on my Tiger. I had the Ventura rack and luggage on my ex-Scrambler and it was nice stuff but I prefer lockable waterproof hard bags so I decided to go for the Five Stars.

    Strangely enough TwistedThrottle had a rack in stock so I got it a day or two after I ordered it. It seems to be well-made. I got the pre-assembly done, i.e. installing the Givi hardware kit to the rack. The instructions are in German only but it's easy enough to figure out. There are two pins that get installed toward the front of the rack and the wedge-shaped lock thing that gets installed toward the rear (the side with the notch in it faces the front of the bike). They also supply a few rubber bumpers to fill the leftover holes in the rack as well as two plastic end caps that get tapped into the ends of the rack tubes.

    Installation to the bike was pretty easy. You have to remove the red side reflectors if you have them installed - they are allen on the outside and there is a 14mm nut on the back side - you can just barely get a wrench in there between the fender.

    The front of the rack mounts on the studs for the rear shocks. Undo the 17mm nuts, put the rack on (I had to "stretch" it a bit to get it over the second stud), then put the nuts back on. The second fixing point uses the hardware supplied in the Five Stars kit, a bolt, nut and washer. The bolt and washer go on the outside, the 13mm locknut goes on the backside and then snug it up. That's pretty much all there is to it. The rack looks nice on there and the bike doesn't look as horrible as I thought it would with a top case on it.

    The only thing I don't like about the Five Stars rack is it kinda blocks the neat little grab handles but you can work around it.

    Here's the rack installed:

    [​IMG]

    Here's a close-up of the mounting:

    [​IMG]

    Here's a crappy iPhone pic of the bike with rack & top case mounted. It may not look great but man it sure makes the bike a lot more practical and useful:

    [​IMG]
    #24
  5. Kentucky

    Kentucky Long timer

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    That is a five star rack. I'm debating on buying the luggage rack too. I have a third GIVI case and really could use that extra capacity on long tours. They require a little bit of special work to install on US models but it is definitely doable. They really work.
    Barry
    #25
  6. Chad_NC

    Chad_NC Long timer

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    OK, first of all, thats not MY style of bike. BUT, that is a very beautiful bike. I cant believe that you found a 10 year old bike in that good of condition. Even with the luggage on the back, it still looks good. Congrats on the rare find! I didnt even know what a W650 was until this thread. I had heard them mentioned here and there but never knew what style of bike it was. Sitting beside that Bonneville, it looks like a nicer clone!
    #26
  7. hockeygoon

    hockeygoon Been here awhile

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    Nice clean Dub.

    I put on the low-bar from Z-power this summer and I like it better. I do get a bit more vibration through the bars now though, so I am gonna add some bar-end weights to see if that helps.

    The Yahoo groups, which I find to be kind of difficult to search, do have a lot of useful info. There are 2 groups, the W650Riders and W650Registry. The registry seems to be more useful for me as they are focused on maintenance/modification questions.

    With the low bars:
    [​IMG]
    #27
  8. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    Love these W650's guys, but they're not UJM's. We had a discussion in another thread about this.... the generally accepted definition of a UJM is a four-cylinder, not a twin.

    - Mark
    #28
  9. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    So the other day I pulled out the carbs to drill out the caps over the pilot screws. I also wanted to take off the float bowls and have a look inside just to check for general cleanliness, clogged jets, etc.

    I purchased the official Kawasaki service manual from RepairManual.com. This manual is great, it's very well-written and guided me through the job. They had it in stock and I got it in the mail a few days later. Well worth the $55 it will cost you. I only wish that it was 3-hole-punched and in a binder like the Triumph manual so it would lay flat but I guess a hacksaw and a 3-hole-punch can fix that pretty quick.

    I hope these steps will help folks who might need to do this in the future.

    1) First step is to remove the seat. Put your key in the lock, turn it and remove the seat upward and to the rear. Set it aside where you won't step on it or spill stuff on it. You will then be faced with this view:

    [​IMG]

    2) Next thing is to remove both side covers. The mounting is slightly different for each one. On the left side there is a phillips screw at the bottom of the side cover and a locating pin that passes through a grommet at the rear of the side cover:

    [​IMG]

    On the right side cover, there are two phillips screws, one at the bottom and one at the rear.

    [​IMG]

    Finally there are 2 phillips screws at the top, to the rear of the fuel tank.

    [​IMG]

    Pull the sidecovers off carefully and set them aside.

    3) Next it's time to remove the fuel tank. First prepare a place to set it, preferably on a towel or something so you won't scratch the paint on the bottom. Get out your 10mm socket and remove the two bolts at the rear of the tank.

    [​IMG]

    Now go to the left side of the tank and pull the two hoses off the petcock. The smaller hose is the vacuum hose - this bike has a vacuum activated petcock. Make sure the petcock is set to "ON" or "RES" before disconnecting any hoses. If it's set to "PRI" you will get doused with gasoline when you pull off the fuel hose.

    The fuel hose has a small metal clamp around it, Kawasaki was kind enough to design these clamps so you can undo them with your fingers - no pliers required. Just squeeze the tabs together and move it down the hose past the tap. Thanks Kawi!

    [​IMG]

    Now go to the right side of the tank and find the two vent hoses that attach to the bottom of the tank and feed down between the carbs and end up down by the swingarm. The book says to remove these from the tank but I found it's easier to just pull them up and out to the side so you can remove the tank with the vent hoses in place. Once you pull the hoses out, you can now pull the tank to the rear to disengage the front mounting lugs, then carefully lift it up and set it aside. Dropping it would be a very expensive mistake.

    You are now looking at this:

    [​IMG]

    The next step is to remove the airbox. In order to do that, you have to deal with the electrical panel that lives under the left side cover. So:

    4) Disconnect the electrical connections from the battery. To do that, go up to the top and look at the underseat area. The fusebox lives there and is held down by a rubber strap. Pull the fuse box out from the rubber strap and let it hang by the wiring harness over the left side of the frame.

    There are two little plastic hinged covers over the battery terminals. Pull them back and undo the battery connections (ground first, then positive).

    [​IMG]

    Now go to the left side and locate the two 10mm bolts that hold the electrical panel in place:

    [​IMG]

    Undo the bolts. You may also wish to loosen some of the flexible metal straps that hold various parts of the wiring harness in place. The idea is to create enough room to get the battery out by swinging the entire electrical panel forward using the harness as a hinge. This is made easier by pulling the + and - battery cables out from the battery box. Once you do that, you can easily swing the whole thing aside and pull the battery out. The airbox is also the battery box so it's gotta come out.

    Now disconnect the air injection hard line attached to the airbox from the soft hose that runs to the air injection pump. This junction is located under the frame backbone just above the carbs.

    [​IMG]

    Go up top and remove the two 8mm bolts that mount the airbox. These are located the same area as the top side cover screws.

    [​IMG]

    Now go underneath the carbs and find the crankcase ventilation hose. Disconnect it from the airbox by removing the clamp and pulling off the hose - this clamp can also be undone by finger power.

    [​IMG]

    Now go to the left side of the airbox and find the two phillips screws that secure the two halves of the airbox. One is located just to the left of where the electrical panel mounts, the other is located on the airbox just below where the electrical panel would be. For some reason I forgot to take a picture of these.

    Once you undo those two screws, the airbox is almost ready to come out in halves. There are also two drain hoses, one for each half of the airbox. They are hard to reach with the airbox in place but if you undo them as you pull the airbox out they are easy to get to. Again, remove the clamps with finger power and pull the hoses off. The airbox is removed to the rear and to the side. You have to disengage them from the carbs and then pull them out. The top of the airbox may snag the wiring harness as you pull it out. Pull the airbox halves out and then set them aside.

    5) Now you are ready to pull out the carbs. For some reason I stopped taking lots of pictures at this point. Here's what you gotta do: First, follow the wiring harness from the throttle position sensor on the right carb up until you find its connector zip-tied to the frame backbone:

    [​IMG]

    You need to pull apart the connector and then cut the big wire tie so you can get the carb end out.

    The service manual also talks about disconnecting the plug for the carb heaters but the U.S. model doesn't have those.

    Next, loosen the two clamps that secure the carbs to the boots on the cylinder head. Pull the carbs back to disengage them from the boots and then angle them over to the left side to deal with the throttle cables.

    There are two cables and a little gold-colored clip that secures the cables to their bracket on the carbs. Unhook the little clip (it stays attached to one of the cables) and then you can slide the throttle cables out of their brackets.

    [​IMG]

    You then need to play around with the throttle lever a bit to find the right place where you can disengage the cables from the throttle. You may need to increase the cable freeplay at the throttle grip (loosen the locknuts and spin the adjuster nuts clockwise) to have enough slack in the cables to disengage them from the carbs.

    Once you have those free, the carbs are out, ready for you to do as you wish.

    Installation is the reverse of removal. :lol3
    #29
  10. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    Can you tell me a little about what needs to be done to make it fit the U.S.-spec bike? Maybe with pics? :evil

    I have heard that some mods need to happen to make it work, something with the rear bracket - but I'm having a hard time picturing what needs to be done.
    #30
  11. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    It's pretty straightforward, I got to poking around craigslist and eBay to see what was out there and found zero. A few days later I hit eBay again and this was the only one. Had a very reasonable "buy it now" price so I scheduled an appt. with the guy to see the bike all the while crossing my fingers that someone wouldn't snap it up.

    As soon as I saw the condition the bike was in, I knew that was it. I pulled out my iPhone and hit "buy it now" on the spot. :lol3

    Got the cash together and picked it up the following weekend.

    The new Triumph 865s definitely have more power but this thing has enough for me for what it is. I've got my Tiger 1050 if I need more power.

    I'm planning to leave it stock, I like it just the way it is. Any mods will be reversible.
    #31
  12. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    It had 9711 miles when I bought it.


    They made a W400? Cool! :D
    #32
  13. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    OK so besides the snap/crackle/pop on decel I've noted in my previous posts (due to lean mix) I've noticed that sometimes, pretty much always on a long, throttle-completely closed decel (like going down a steep hill or coming off the highway), in addition to the usual crackles and pops I will occasionally also get a big BANG! proper backfire through the exhaust. Like the kind that makes people duck because they think someone's shooting.

    My question is this: even if I shim the needle and that really helps with the flat spot/lean surge at steady throttle/low throttle openings, when the throttle is completely closed, my understanding is that at that point, the main jet is not in play and everything is going through the pilot/idle circuit. If that's the case, will shimming the needle do anything to address the popping through the exhaust on closed throttle decel or will I still need to replace the pilot jets with something larger?

    And if so, where's a good place to shop for replacement Keihin jets?

    EDIT: this reminds me: when I drilled out the pilot screw plugs, I found that one screw was factory set a full turn in compared to the other. I later read on a web site somewhere that this was done because the air path to that carb was a bit more tortured in the W650 -- all the air comes into the airbox from the right side and then does not have a very clear path to the left side of the airbox and into the carb. Perhaps I should be sure to take that into account when setting up the carbs so I don't wind up with too rich an idle mixture on the left cylinder.
    #33
  14. Oilhed

    Oilhed MarkF

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    I agree!!! If it wasa 800-900cc it might have done better. I think it's just right but as a second bike for me. Too bad it's no more. Love the bevel gear cam!
    #34
  15. Kentucky

    Kentucky Long timer

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    I have a question for all you W addicts like myself. I use mine for lots of Interstate travel. The stock front sprocket is a 15 tooth and I am gearing the old girl a little taller with a 16 on Friday before heading to LA. Has anyone geared their W taller and what has been the result?
    Barry
    #35
  16. Kentucky

    Kentucky Long timer

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    That is very informative. I'm sure you are aware of this but that paperwork under the seat in front and on top of the toolkit is seriously restricting your airbox flow. Some say that moving the tookit to another location is even a good idea. I'm thinking that you have some serious restriction going on there.
    Barry
    #36
  17. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    My thoughts are that's less of an issue than it's made out to be. Even if I move the toolkit there will still be a seat covering up the intake. I'm not looking to extract every last horsepower. Not to mention the thing already is running lean, the last thing I need is more airflow :D
    #37
  18. Kentucky

    Kentucky Long timer

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    That is a very good point. I had not thought of the lean condition and adding more air could make it worse. Though either way it may not be enough differnce. Nevermind.
    Barry
    #38
  19. Kentucky

    Kentucky Long timer

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    I did the 16 tooth countershaft conversion today. It improved the motorcycle in every way. It feels like it has an additional 100cc. No more short shifting. Gets away from the line still no problem and the speedo's 10% error has been corrected at least very close. From what I can tell using mile markers I am doing 60 miles per minute. The bike is now running right at 80 at an indicated 80 and it is turning 500 less rpm at the actual 80 mph mark instead of 5000 at indicated 80 that was actually 72!
    Now I'm ready to head to California.
    Barry
    #39
  20. ADK

    ADK ____

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    60 miles per minute and you have time to look at mile markers? :eek1 :lol3
    #40