New (to Me) 2000 Kawasaki W650

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by The Jerk, Oct 11, 2009.

  1. Bar None

    Bar None Candy Ass

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    Speedo66,
    Yikes, that is a lot of damage to your bike. Hopefully the frame and forks are not bent.
  2. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate

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    Just put new shoes on the Dub. Had Metzler Lasertec's. Lasted about 7K miles. Rear was shot, front had tread but was also scalloped, with predictable influence on the handling--wretched.

    Put new BT45's on and went with the 120 in the rear. First impression is--really positive. Though they're too new to push yet, the turn in is great, and they're stable in turns and at speed, unlike what the Metzler's had become.
  3. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

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    Anybody put rearsets on their W and have a right side front footpeg bracket and footpeg laying around?
  4. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate

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    Took a ride in Northern Virginia today, around an almost-not-there place named Delaplane. The railroad depot saw much use during the Civil War. Lot's of back roads; the best views were usually on the gravel roads.

    [​IMG]

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    My kind of roads . . . .

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    [​IMG]
  5. Bar None

    Bar None Candy Ass

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    ORexpat,
    Nice ride and photos.
    The depot looks in pretty good shape. Is it in use? Somebody needs to restore it.
  6. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate

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    The depot's now an antique store; not open very often. It's a little out of the way and while thousands of cars go by 100 meters away on Rt 17, it seems very few stop.

    There's probably a dozen up-scale wineries within a 30 minute radius. I'd bet some ambitious and hardworking type could build a business plan for some sort of eatery or tavern here . . . .
  7. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

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    Nice location, nice pics. :clap
  8. zwish

    zwish Adventurer

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    Or any other tips for improving warm up time? I've got my mixture screws at 3 turns out right now. Maybe go to 3.5?
  9. Bar None

    Bar None Candy Ass

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    Try 3.5 but when I had mine at 3.5 the warm up time was the same as 3 if I remember right.

    I start the bike at full choke, let it warm up a bit, half choke, start riding at a moderate pace for a bit more, and then choke off. No big deal for me. I am riding for more than 2 miles though.:rofl
  10. Bar None

    Bar None Candy Ass

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    Speedo66,
    Don't know if are on the Yahoo W650 group but in case you are not, used W650 parts for sale at:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/W650riders/message/175743
    Also you might post there for the parts you need.
  11. Irish1

    Irish1 Been here awhile

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  12. folmonty

    folmonty Been here awhile

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    Just reading through the postings and saw this - make a small hole using a drill after punching a dimple with a nail or punch (lightly). Then put a wood screw in 1/2 turn and pull the cap out. It's very easy but you must remove the carbs to do it.
  13. folmonty

    folmonty Been here awhile

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    Nice pictures ORexpat! How cool is it that you have all that in your back yard. I'm envious! Good to see you still so active helping other Wriders with their bikes. Like the BT45 review as I have a set to put on. Enjoy the fall weather!
  14. Bar None

    Bar None Candy Ass

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    Nice looking seat. I emailed him and said I would buy it if he would (I'd pay) ship it to me.
  15. folmonty

    folmonty Been here awhile

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    Outstanding story Barry. One never knows where the Wubya might show up. Your travel log sure speaks volumes to it's versatility. I'd like to read your entire story as "the year in review." Bet there's some great memories eh? Wubya running with the big dogs!
  16. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate

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    I had a dremel when I did mine. With a 90 degree attachment it's pretty easy. Used a short conical dremel tool to bore through the cap. I recall I used a nail or an awl to pop the cap out.

    I suspect that the cost of a dremel tool is worth it compared to pulling the carbs just to remove the airscrew caps. :deal

    BTW, thanks for the compliments on the photos and riding area. The riding's indeed fine-almost makes up for having to live in the DC metro area! :rofl
  17. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

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    I used a regular Dremel, came in on an angle with a round head bit, and pulled the cap off with a little hook tool.

    Did all with the carbs on, no need to remove.

    The Cap't Jake thread on shimming the needles is still down, it's pretty straight forward though. Just remove enough stuff over the carbs until you're able to unscrew and remove the tops of the carbs. Then lift up needle and rubber diaphragm, remove needle and put the shim/washer on it, return needle to carb, and put everything back together.

    The only thing I don't remember is the thickness/size of the washer. :huh

    *TIP* I remember in the thread he cautioned to put a rag to cover the gap in the engine below the carbs so if you dropped a screw, etc., it wouldn't be lost.

    Barnone, thanks for the tip on the parts search. I'll try and join and take a look.
  18. zwish

    zwish Adventurer

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    Does anyone happen to know the size of the washer required for the shim mod? Excuse my ignorance on this mod, but it's purpose is to improve fueling, get rid of flat spot in the power delivery, and improves warmup time, correct?

    I'm going to hopefully knock out the shim mod and KAC removal before winter arrives. I commute to work through the winter months. Thanks!
  19. Pigford

    Pigford British

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    The shim size is not hyper-critical, it will effect from approx 1/8 throttle open to 3/4 - or from part throttle to when the needle is clear of the emulsion tube (needle jet) and the main jet is fully open. I'd have thought a 0.5mm thk washer would have a slight effect, combined with doing the pilot jet screw to make it a bit richer.

    Every bike will be slightly different depending on engine condition, fuel type, carb wear, altitude, etc, etc..... so whats been recommended for one bike, won't necessarily be right for yours :huh
  20. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate

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    I had a couple of shims in mine. They were just tiny washers from the hardware store that were the right size to slip over the needle.

    But I took them out. The only difference I noticed was poorer mileage. If there was any more power with them, the seat of my pants couldn't tell.

    I do have the air system blocked, and the air screws are somewhere around 3 turns out. I still need to get off my lazy seat-of-pants and try the "Jon Haddock" method of getting the air screws right. Not that he's necessarily right either, but it's an easy thing to try.

    (Bike about half warmed up, turn the idle down to where it barely runs, then try to adjust the air screws to the point where you can hear the difference . . . since I don't know exactly what to listen for, it should be fun! :roflThen take the idle back up to the normal 900-1000 rpm).