New (to Me) 2000 Kawasaki W650

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by The Jerk, Oct 11, 2009.

  1. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer

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    Just ride her as normal and keep an eye on the area. Probably not a big deal if she sounds and runs just fine.
  2. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate

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    +1
  3. Pigford

    Pigford British

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    + 2 :D

    If the bike had a head gasket leak - and you got it hot & ran it for a bit, odd's on you'd see the oil. If it does start to leak, TALCUM powder is good for seeing where the oil is coming from :lol3
  4. Blakebird

    Blakebird r-u-n-n-o-f-t

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    so is Dr. Scholl's foot powder ...I was trying to find a weep on my RSV Mille and someone suggested a can of white aerosol foot powder. Worked like a charm.
  5. Scrivens

    Scrivens Been here awhile

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    That type of weep is fairly common, and generally harmless. It usually appears around where barrel bolts go into the head and is caused by the minute expansion and contraction of the joint due to heat. Keep an eye on it over the next few months and if you start to get a slight run of oil rather than the mist, re-torque the heads. Slacken the nuts back about half a turn and bring them back up to proper torque in "star" sequence.
  6. GoonerYoda

    GoonerYoda Hot Dickens Cider

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    Took the W out to the Napa Valley for a ride today. Sorry for the large pictures.

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    Only had time to stop at Opus One. :D
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    Stopped in St. Helena for lunch.
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  7. rulle_retard

    rulle_retard Adventurer

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    Ok! Thanks for the info! :)
    And everyone else for the answers!
  8. zwish

    zwish Adventurer

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    Hey gang, It's been a while since I've posted. The W650 and I are still getting along famously. The one issue that rears its head from time to time, especially in these frosty winters is the lean nature of the bike. It seems that once the bike warms up it's fine, but still a bit on the lean side. The long warmup period is what gets me. I've read through this thread multiple times over through the past 8 months or so, but I'm curious. Those of you who have modified the fuel mixture, whether it was air mixture screws, rejetting, going with pod filters, etc, What has worked well, would you do it again, what were the effects?

    The only thing that I've done is turn the air mixture screws out 3.5 turns, and block off the Clean Air System with a marble. The marble has stopped the backfiring when you clutch-in, but the bike still feels like it's not riding as smoothly as it could for the first 15 min or so. I did not have this problem with an 860cc carbureted Bonneville, so I don't think it's an issue of a larger displacement engine taking a while to heat up. The W650 however has been perfect as far as reliability is concerned. It never misses a beat. Anyways, just curious what you all were doing to your bikes. Thanks.
  9. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate

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    I think they just tend to run lean. I suspect if you want to make progress there you'll have to go to the next size bigger pilot jets.

    I don't find it that much of a problem, so I've just lived with it. That and being too lazy to try to pull the carbs!
  10. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

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    I shimmed the needles. Did it the same time I turned the idle screws out. Runs great now, but can't tell which actually did it, or if it was the combination of the two.

    The "how to" photos and explanation used to be on the "Capt. Jake" site, but wasn't last time I looked several months ago.
  11. zwish

    zwish Adventurer

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    Yeah, I remember you saying a while back that you shimmed your needles. I've been hoping that would pop back up on Capt's site. No luck yet. I've heard mixed reviews about the needle shim. Some people said it didn't cure anything and hurt mileage. Other's like you said it might contribute to a better running bike. I'll have to take a look at that. It seems like a rejet might be my best bet. Wonder what that would do to the MPG.
  12. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate

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    Shimming the needles affects the main jets, which come into play, so I've heard, around 3000 rpm or thereabouts.

    I did the same thing, but all it did for me was use more gas without much other effect. So I took the shims out. (Pretty easy to do--much easier than the pilot jets. And easy to reverse if it doesn't work out).

    YMMV . . . . . :evil
  13. Blakebird

    Blakebird r-u-n-n-o-f-t

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    The previous owner of the one I recently bought had put in Thruxton needles, which apparently have a richer taper. He'd also exposed the fuel/air screw and backed it out 1/2 turn.

    On a cold morning it needs choke to start, but can be ridden away in a minute. It carburets crisply.

  14. Pigford

    Pigford British

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    Here you go.........



    Raising the needles make the mix richer - effecting 1/4 - 3/4 throttle range (approx) - it isn't necessarily related to rpm !


    The pilot jets defo need to be upped 1 x size to help the poor part throttle running/spit back & slow warm-up.

    To ensure the air:fuel ratio is not overly lean at over 1/2 throttle opening, try upping the main jet a bit.... leave the needles until you've done this first.
  15. pjensen641

    pjensen641 Been here awhile

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    The general consensus on the Yahoo W650 group is that the main jet is already too RICH. I believe stock is about 118 and the ideal for stock air box and exhaust was found to be 112 by several who have dyno run and checked AFR with a sniffer. The overly rich main makes up for the non-ideal needles.

    The needles are not tapered enough, this is an emissions thing. It allows really lean running in the operation range where the emissions are evaluated (low to mid throttle), then the overly RICH main jets help protect the engine at high load/rpm. Ideally, you should buy a jet kit with needles that have a more aggressive taper so that a 112 main can be ran, this will give a more consistent AFR throughout the operating range. The Factory Pro jet kits have the necessary needles.

    The idle jets seemed like there was no consensus. Either run the stock and back the idle screws out to 3.5-4 turns (or there abouts) or go one size bigger and turn the screws in. I read opinions that going to the 38 idle jets caused increased consumption, and it was better to keep the stock 35's with backed out screws. If you don't care about increased consumption, go with the 38's to get a quick warm up.

    This is all information I am regurgitating and paraphrasing from the Yahoo W650 group. I can't link the exact posts, but if you join and do a message search for "Jet Kit" or "Factory Pro" I think you will find the information.
  16. Pigford

    Pigford British

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    Pjensen641 - thats interesting - and I agree that either have "waisted" needles to increase fuel at a set needle/throttle opening to make a bit richer..... or a larger main jet.

    As you rightly say, a DYNO run is the only 100% way to evaluate the A/F ratio to ensure you're not running lean at WOT (Wide Open Throttle), which could spell disaster :eek1 if the main jets are too small !!!

    One point with the pilot jet and the pilot screw.... it's generally accepted that once the screw is open over about 3 or 4 turns, the screw has zero effect as the passageway is full open..... so if you start winding it further the next size pilot jet is needed.

    NOTE: The PILOT SCREW is in fact a method of controlling FUEL flow - not AIR (as in AIR SCREW)..... this is usually distinguished by the fact that the scew is the ENIGINE side of the carb - not the AIR BOX (intake) side :deal So if the screw needs to be wound out, it's to make the part throttle circuit RICHER.

    Due to the sh*te weather here (UK) I haven't had chance to go for a decent run to do a plug-chop, so can't comment to specifically yet.
  17. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer

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    Triumph Thruxton (NBZT)
    length
    2.152
    Diameters
    tip+ 0.0 = 0.066
    tip+ 0.2 = 0.070
    tip+ 0.4 = 0.074
    tip+ 0.6 = 0.079
    tip+ 0.8 = 0.084
    tip+ 1.0 = 0.090
    Taper begins
    Tip+ 1.330
    Non taper Diameter
    0.097

    Anybody got the specs on the stock W needles?
  18. acap650

    acap650 acap650

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    W650 needles are different left and right because airbox design is not symmetrical. Different part numbers for each side here:
    http://www.powersedge.com/pages/Oem.../CARBURETOR_PARTS/EJ650-A2-2000/C19C1946E1612
  19. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer

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    Funny that the Dynojet kit has both needles the same.
    STAGE ONE INSTRUCTIONS
    1. Remove the vacuum slide from the carbs. Remove the stock needles & spacers, noting the order of assembly.
    2. Install the Dynojet needles on groove # 2, using all stock spacers (Fig. A). Install the adjusting washers above the
    e-clip (2 per needle). Install the Dynojet slide springs (DSP005) in place of the stock slide springs.
    3. Remove the main jet and replace with the Dynojet main jets provided. Use the DJ108 main jets with stock exhaust.
    Use the DJ112 main jets with aftermarket headers or slip-ons with free flowing baffles. Be sure that the jets you are
    changing are the main jets.
    4. Locate the fuel mixture screw (Fig. B). If you see a screw head, proceed to adjusting procedure. With the plug drill
    (DD #5/32) provided, carefully drill thru the plugs. NOTE: The mixture screw is directly underneath this plug, be ready
    to pull back on the drill the instant you break thru. Use screw provided to secure and remove the plug. Carefully turn
    mixture screw clockwise until seated, then back out 3 turns.
    http://www.dynojet.com/pdf/2176.pdf

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/00-02-Kawasaki-W650-Dynojet-carburetor-jet-kit-stg-1-/310292839382
  20. zwish

    zwish Adventurer

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    So has anyone installed that Dyno kit? Looks like it could be a good solution. Thanks!