New Touratech farkel: Touratech Companero

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by sanjaya_sugiarto, Nov 18, 2010.

  1. CanadianBacon

    CanadianBacon Got knees for sale???

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    Well, if you get caught in the rain with a suit with no inner shell on you'll get wet anyways.... I don't quite understand your comment.... It takes a whole of 10 seconds to put the outer shell on... :lol3:lol3
  2. Jonesky

    Jonesky Been here awhile

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    I don't understand my own comments sometimes. :lol3 What did happen to me once was taking in a lunch at altitude or a warm day and misjudging the weather thru a pass I was riding thru and soon as I got over a ridge I got wet as the weather changed rapidly. And it was a wet slick steep muddy cold affair and I couldn't stop to change gear. Once I could stop I was soaked and cold but I was able to put on the inner liners on my RP2 and was warm and dry thereafter. My fault for not seeing that coming but that's why it occurred to me in the first place.
  3. TBaird

    TBaird Adventurer

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    Any updates from owners out there yet?

    Thx,
    Tyler
  4. kevinj

    kevinj Been here awhile

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    Although it is way out of my budget, I am also considering buying this suit and would love more input from those who already own it. Crucial features for me are the ability to ride through several climate zones with just one set of gear, in particular in hot climates; and excellent fit (adjustable; armor in the inner layer). The latter point was driven home to me last week when I was trying on someRev'it gear at a BMW dealership, and the fancier jacket (Defender) with higher-rated armor turned out to be less protective than a cheaper jacket (Sand) with thinner armor ... because it wasn't going to stay in place as well. (As with all products, you can read spec sheets and review until your eyes glaze over; 10 minutes of one-on-one time with the product is generally more informative.)

    It seems that these two points:
    * warm weather performance
    * good fit

    have been confirmed in reviews. I'd be interested to hear more about
    * cold/wet performance
    * crash protection.

    According to the TT catalog, all protection (shoulder, back, elbow, hip, knee, and coccyx (=tailbone)) is SAS-TEC KNOX. If anyone knows what that means out the real world, I'm all ears :). As far as I understand, it's all CE certified; some level 1, some level 2. I don't know if one can upgrade. The suit itself is part Cordura 500, which is not really considered very safe anymore these days, and partly Cordura 2000, which is considered pretty good. It would be crucial to know where the 2000 lives, and where you have to make do with measly 500. The outer jacket is the latest Gore-tex/Cordura, similar to what all the fancy brands use for waterproofing. There is actual 3M material on the jacket, which is the sh!t for visibility.
    My almost entirely uninformed opinion is that this brings the Companero roughly to the level of other high-end jackets, with likely exception of the Motoports?




    Since I'm fortunate enough to live 3 miles from Touratech's only US retail store, I dropped in a couple days ago to take a look at the Companero suit. They had one on the shelf that was close to the right size for me: made for someone who's 6' like me, but probably 20 lbs heavier. My experience is limited to putting on the gear and walking around the store for an hour, which admittedly isn't much.

    As soon as I put it on, I experienced a sense of peace and relief : the whole garment breathes quality, there is nothing that looks or feels flimsy or careless, and that gave me an immediate sense of security. The fabric, the pockets, the zippers, ..., everything seems dependable. You get the impression that real, breathing humans have been involved with the design process to make sure the zippers open easily, and everything can be reached without hyperextending several joints. This is rarer than it ought to be. The store also stocks some Klim jackets; they looked a bit boring and, I don't know, lower-class by comparison. (I didn't try them on.)

    Wearing just the summer layer is quite comfortable. At that point it's easy to forget that you're wearing motorcycle gear. This is quite amazing given that you still have all your amor on! With both layers on, I no longer felt like I'd climb a tree for a better angle for a photo without a second thought. But I think you still could. At that point it's a little bulkier, but no worse than the BMW or Rev'it clothing I tried on; and the whole point of this suit is, for me, that you can reduce it to the summer layer when appropriate.

    Although there are adjustment loops and buttons in many places, it's still important to get the sizing right; the jacket I tried on was made for someone heavier than me, and I ran out of velcro in the waist area. The adjustments on sleeves and pant legs are buttons with only 2 or 3 settings (which should correspond to 0 and 1 layers underneath, I guess). I don't know if that accomodates those of us at the far ends of the BMI scale.

    The salesperson told me that she'd felt fine wearing the suit on the highway at low temperatures (that means 30s-40s where I live); I never took it outside the building but I imagine I'd want to add a layer. Since you want the suit to be pretty snug, you won't be able to add more than 1 layer; that may well have to be an electric piece depending on where you're going. Of course, if you're spending $2300 on a suit, you probably won't care about $200 extra for a heated liner.

    I like the pouch for carrying the outer suit. It seems it is adequate for carrying both outer pants and jacket, but you'd have to roll them up pretty tightly to fit both in that pouch. A bit like fitting your sleeping mat in its stuff sack - you never get it as tight as it was in the store :). Probably takes some practice.

    I really liked the pocket for sunglasses. I thought the transparent pocket on the left sleeve was ugly and I'd probably have it removed.

    I've seen a claim somewhere that you can put on the rainpants without removing your boots; I didn't try, but I'm skeptical. (I wear BMW Santiago's, which aren't exactly tiny shoes, of course.)

    The TT catalog mentions a black edition of the Companero suit. I can't quite decide if I like the standard yellow/grey look. Of course most MC gear is so screaming ugly that it's not hard to look good by comparison. In the end I think it still looks "sporty" (the way running shoes are intentionally not made too pretty), and I would've preferred a "classier" style.

    The "3 in 1" claim (summer jacket ; 2-layer wet/cold jacket ; outer layer alone as gore-tex jacket) is YMMV. There's no question that the outer jacket by itself will do a decent job: if you stop somewhere along the way and want to go for a walk or just go around town doing your business, it will be comfortable, surely keep you gore-tex dry, and look fine. However it is not a replacement for a dedicated jacket you own for a specific sport; e.g. I have a $400 North Face jacket for hiking that looks way more elegant and is significantly more performant and comfortable. But that is not to criticise the Companero jacket but just to temper expectations: the mere fact that you can use the outer shell by itself as an acceptable will-keep-you-really-dry jacket/pant is quite amazing and certainly a bonus. Just don't expect that you'll take it backpacking, or that you will want to wear it into a restaurant on a date.

    Finally, hip and coccyx protectors are sometimes dissed for being uncomfortable. At least in the Companero there is no discomfort at all. The armor is comfortable. You barely notice the hip and tailbone protectors. (If you reach down to put on your boots, the coccyx protector pushes in slightly, as if someone were cupping your ass ;-). It's really not unpleasant ;-).) I don't have any idea of how good they'd be in a crash. Back armor combined with coccyx armor really covers your entire spine up to the base of the neck. Elbow armor fits snugly. I wasn't sure of the positioning of the knee armor, but as I've said before, I probably need a slightly different size than the one I tried on.

    A final remark: I don't know how easy it would be to address issues with these suits if any arise. At least I can just go to Touratech any day I feel like it, but for many of you that won't be practical. If any adjustments are necessary, I wouldn't be surprised if they have to send it back to Europe (I didn't ask).


    Anyway, just some of my observations. Overall, I didn't notice anything of low quality, nor any oversights in the design. I think the basic design philosophy (summer jacket with full protection; gore-tex layer on the outside) is a very sensible design. Imo, it is always possible to add extra warmth to an outfit, but it is impossible to strip warmth away at some point since you can't take off your armor; the Companero design gives me the reassurance that I'll be okay in hot weather. For those of us who don't only ride on sundays and on country highways, and can't count on always moving at the speeds they enjoy, good ventilation is very important. I can always wear a warmer fleece or whatnot when it's cold.

    Just as I bought a r1200gs because I can own only one vehicle and it needs to be good across the spectrum even if there's a bike to beat it in any single aspect, I want a suit that will keep me happy on a long north->south trip any time of the year. No doubt there are better suits for cold weather (rukka?); and probably suits that are better for pure protection (motoport? certain leather?) ; but I'm not convinced there's anything that covers quite the same range of applications.

    To the inevitable question of whether this suit is worth the price ($2300 for jacket+pants), I have no answer. I imagine that similar crash protection can be purchased for about half the price; beyond that, the selling point of this outfit is really comfort, design, and temperature range. I can say that it seems well designed, well made, and unlikely to disappoint in any aspect of performance.




    For what it's worth, I ride year-round in Seattle WA in all weather, and plan trips into the South; Mexico; perhaps even Central America. I'm 6-0 if you permit me to round up very slightly; 145-150lbs. So far, I have only owned crap gear. My shortlist for a long overdue upgrade :
    Touratech Companero ($2300)
    Motoport Kevlar (~ $1500)
    Mid-range Rev-it, e.g. Sand (~ $1000)
  5. kevinj

    kevinj Been here awhile

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    At least two of the local Touratech employees here own a Companero suit. I'm sure they get a discount, but even so, it must be a serious investment for someone working as a salesperson. I just thought I'd mention that.
  6. Snarky

    Snarky Vodka Infused.

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    It's funny. I was hesitant to buy a 1400$ suit (REV'IT Defender). It really was (imo) worth the extra thousand dollars I paid over my cheaper suit (Tourmaster Centurion). I wonder if the Companero is worth the extra thousand dollars it costs over the Defender.

    No offense to EU residents, but "Made in the EU" is not exactly an instant sign of quality. Like most exporting regions, it's hit or miss. Some of the best stuff is "Made in China", also some of the worst. I don't want to pay extra just because it wasn't made by Chinese wage slaves. I would like more tangible benefits for the investment on gear.
  7. hawideri

    hawideri Adventurer

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    Made in the EU may not be that convincing, but stadler is made in Germany. A country that is know for his topproducts (it is export economy for that very reason).

    I have been searching for a top end textile gear a while. Have considered BMW, rukka,stadler and klim. Stadler wins the race for me, since it overs customication of any suit.

    I was draw to this brand, since they have a 10 year warranty.:eek1 they are still in business so that is impressive, imho.
  8. kevinj

    kevinj Been here awhile

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    Did you get the Companero then (I forget the name of the European almost-equivalent)? Or did you go for another Stadler outfit? I've looked at their website, but found it lacking in detail, even the German version. Would appreciate some pointers :).
  9. hawideri

    hawideri Adventurer

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    I went for the force pro. It is similair to the track pro, but the leather parts are superfabric. It is also similair to the super vent pro, but i'd like the snit of the force better.
    But really you should go to a dealer. All the gear is good, but tailered for a certaint use/public.
    You may contact them, but bear in mind that this company can be very buzzy (big orders, they do supply police,fire departments for different countries).

    So the question is: what do you want from your gear?
  10. Endurodude

    Endurodude Been here awhile

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    "According to the TT catalog, all protection (shoulder, back, elbow, hip, knee, and coccyx (=tailbone)) is SAS-TEC KNOX. If anyone knows what that means out the real world, I'm all ears :). "

    I'm looking to buy some everyday, don't-worry-if-you-scrape-them trousers, and saw some with SAS-TEC armour. When I asked the difference between this and other armour, I was told that SAS-TEC 'bounces back', as it were. If I knelt down in 'normal' armour (fastening my boots, say), it would gradually compress and be of no real use over time, whereas SAS-TEC would uncompress everytime and be good to go when needed.

    As to the Companero wet-weather usefulness, I'll let you know in a few months! Although I live in England, I'm travelling to TT HQ in Southern Germany to buy a suit (and heading onto Eastern Europe) in late July. It's £500 cheaper that way!!!! :evil Whilst I hope my trip is major-rain free, I feel sure I'll hit some (even if I have to wait until I'm back in the UK!). I'll let you know how it goes . . . .
  11. expatbrit

    expatbrit Still pretty much a n00b.

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    Interesting. I'm interested in the Force Pro myself; it looks like it has more vents than the Race Pro?

    I wish I could go to a dealer, but not so easy in the US. Here in NM no-one stocks ANY of the higher-end stuff, and being unusually sized it's a crapshoot ordering on-line.

    Going to e-mail Stadler; see how their talls will fit and how much....
  12. pingvin

    pingvin Been here awhile

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    The point is that the SAS-TEC is soft when not loaded or under slow deformations but hardens under impact. So comfortable (soft) during normal use but hardens when you crash while absorbing the enery. It will return to normal shape but so will rubber, this is something very different. Great stuff, tested my Stadler suit during a 100kph highside ending up under my bike.


    Sure it's all SAS-TEC, thought Stadler had Knox (which is still good) except SAS-TEC back protector but might be different for Companero? Have all SAS-TEC in my Race/Track Pro suit, downside pockets are made for Knox so had to du some adjustments.
  13. Staudi

    Staudi n00b

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    My Klim adventure rally jacket isn't waterproof and the tissue at the forearm rubs up. It's the second suite, the first one I sent back after a few months because of the forearm prob. The service was very friendly and everything worked out fine. But as I am living in Germany it took about three months to get the new one. I had to send it to America because I bought it there.

    Two weeks ago I was on a trip to Italy and after two or three hours in the rain I got wet at the ellbows inside, the chest and in the pants. So I decided to send it back again and try the Companero black edition because I was in the black forest anyway.

    My judgement after three days: the quality seems to be very high in every detail. It's extremely comfortable to wear, especially the light basic suite - and it's a really good looking suite (now, in the black edition).

    One of you guys asked if you can easily get the rain pants over the Santiago boots - yes, absolutely. I had to do it on the Autobahn, took me about one minute. My size is about 11. With these super long zippers at the sides it's very quick and easy.

    In august I will do some more trips so that I can tell you more about this suite in september.
  14. pkbinder

    pkbinder Kissing Moose

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    Looking forward to more reviews of your suit. Paul
  15. Staudi

    Staudi n00b

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    What I can say so far: this suite is extremely good when it's really warm. It's still comfortable with 95 F (35 C). The pants are even lighter than the KLIM Mojave (which I also like).

    At the moment I think it's a very good solution for a temperature range from about 58 F (14 C) to over 100 F (40 C).

    The quality is great, it's fitting perfectly and there are a lot of useful details.

    One disadvantage (beside the price...): the goretex layer need much more space than a normal rain suite if you store it in your boxes . The advantage is that you can easily reach the pockets in the basic pants.

    If you wear the complete suite you can use a lot of pockets. At least two of them are really waterproof. My two KLIM adventure suites did not have a single pocket in the jacket that is waterproof.

    So up to now I can say that I would buy it again. I really enjoy travelling with it in summer weather more than with any other suite that I had before (BMW Savannah, BMW street guard, BMW Rallye 2 and 3, KLIM adventure).

    Of course you can have a similar result if you buy a cheaper mesh suit plus a goretex/sympatex...rain suite. But if your budget allows it the Companero imho is a very good looking and perfectly fitting suit.

    That's all for now. More about it in three or four weeks when I'm back from France and Denmark.
  16. davsato

    davsato Been here awhile

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    at that price i would hope so!
  17. Staudi

    Staudi n00b

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    That's how it should be - but my experience is different. Some of the most expensive things I bought had horrible quality (like Jaguar S Type, Mercedes E 500, Volkswagen T5 Multivan).

    I'm still hoping for good quality when I'm buying expensive stuff - but I don't expect it anymore. So I'm less disappointed...