New Yamaha SR400 confirmed for USA

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by HondaFanatic, Dec 17, 2012.

  1. brucifer

    brucifer Long timer

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    You get 85 MPG with a pumped TT500?! How is that even possible???
  2. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    All you need is a broken odometer. :lol3
  3. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    Riding pretty mellow I got an average of 43 mpg from a stock SR500.
  4. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    I sure hope they think they will make money by selling an old design sr400 in the US.
    I would go so far as to pay good money for a new one even if I had to sell a kidney or something to get it.


  5. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    If I really wanted one, I'd go buy a fully restored 500. They are out there, what is stopping you? :huh

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1980...7289458?pt=US_motorcycles&hash=item2a27dafcf2

    Heck, it even has tubeless tires!
  6. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    That seems very low.
    I got 60 on a DR650 with a pumper carb, NOT riding easy....

    Granted, I had the needle low for lean running, the main jet was good, and the pump made up for the lean needle.



  7. eatpasta

    eatpasta Lawnmower Target

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    I would be very interested in this as a wife bike....pretty good lookin too
  8. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    Yamaha already has the V-Star 250 and the XT250 for beginners. I seriously doubt they consider beginners important enough to risk bringing something else in. Even though it is an existing model, it would cost a fortune to get it certified to sell in the U.S. Used to you could just bring a few over, if they sold well, bring over some more, if not, no big deal. But with DOT and EPA, it don't work that way no more.
  9. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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  10. fastdadio

    fastdadio Still gettin faster

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    Could we sneak one in from Canada?
  11. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    There are already SR500s here, and they were a flop at their prime! :lol3
  12. Gham

    Gham Long timer

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    Yes they were!!!! I had a 79 and it was so undesirable I left the bastard in Alabama when I moved.Finders keepers!
  13. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    Why some among us want the new moto market to better reflect that of a 3rd World nation I have no idea! I remember the uber deseriable bikes they wouldn't import but they sent us "these". Ugh! :lol3
  14. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    Because they have the bikes some of us want.
    Simple, light, low cost, good economy, practical.
    Most of the bikes like the sr400 and the cb400ss are only sold in Japan, hardly a 3rd world country.
    I suppose, in Japan, not a lot of people buy cb1500rrr type bikes, but TU250's, sr400's and other vintage looking bikes sell, as do Harley's.

    If I could have a collection of bikes in my Garage, I would want a TU250, an sr400, a cb400ss, a V7 classic, a w650, along with some older standard bikes, and I would not have one modern abs, traction control, water cooled wonderbike.

    I think smaller standards are also popular in Europe, and people even tour on smaller bikes, plus the vintage thing has always been big in England.

    These type of bikes tend to be light and comfortable, cheap and fun, with real seats and the ability to mount a rack and carry a passenger in some comfort.
    Contrast the new cb250 or 300 ninja, useless seats, no way to carry stuff without mods, loads of plastic to remove to service, valves may use shims, over weight for the size, uncomfortable riding position unless racing.

    Some people will trade everything for performance, and others want a good all around bike.





  15. gentlemanjim

    gentlemanjim Been here awhile

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    Exactly - Well said
  16. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    A Ninja 300 is a standard. It trades nothing in seating position for performance. Yes, it has fairings, and it "looks" racey, but truth be told, you could ride it a lifetime with oil changes and probably never need a valve adjustment or to pull the 10 bolts to strip the plastics. The shim over bucket is effective and cheap to produce. Cheap is one of your wishes, right? They also stay in adjustment much better, less weight slamming around is a good thing!

    Mods to carry stuff? I recall adding a rack to my 1976 RD400 to carry stuff, I just did the same for my 2013 300 and every bike between them. Of course I could have just bungeed a bag to the rear seat too.

    Get off my lawn. :wink:
  17. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    I think its over weight at 380 pounds, and my wife would never sit on that seat.
    And a luggage rack would likely look silly, if they even make one.
    It also gets 60 mpg which seems very low...




  18. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    And you think a SR400 will be light? A luggage rack looks like a luggage rack and a seat can be modded to be better if it even needs to be. So far after a few hours with a passenger, no complaints. In your golden years I fear your memory isn't quite that clear about the bikes of the 70s! :lol3

    The 300 has gone 104 MPG in a press contest but then you'd have to ride it like an old man so no thanks! :freaky
  19. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    I want this bike for several reasons. Number one is because it looks like what I think a motorcycle should look like. Number two is because it's a thumper. Number three is because it is small enough to handle great around town, still big enough to ride on the freeway (I would rather it be a 500cc) Number four is because it has a kickstarter, a centerstand, and tubeless tires, and does not have ABS. And number five is because it appears to have a true standard riding position, not the lean forward rearset pegs position of a Ninja 300 (I sold a Ninja 500, which most consider a standard, because it was to painful to ride any distance. It was definitely NOT the standard riding position I remember from late '70s/early '80s Japanese bikes. I specifically remember a 1978 Suzuki GS750 standard that had a very comfortable riding position, and it was no cruiser. About the only thing I don't like about this bike is the FI, but if everything else stayed the same, I'd still buy it on the spot.

    As for vintage SR500s, I would have bought one new, but couldn't afford it at the time. Now they have become collectors items, and one in decent condition costs a fortune. But the big problem is a lack of easily available parts. It is such an easy bike to work on, it could be kept going forever is parts were available.

    As for the "third world country", the Royal Enfield is a third world country bike, and look what they cost. And they must sell, because nobody will deal on one. And they are nowhere near as reliable as the Yamaha would be. Then look at HD. They use technology older than any Japanese company, yet look how well they are doing.

    To some, like me, the Japanese no longer make anything resembling real motorcycles. The Honda CB500 series is about the ugliest thing I've ever seen. I take one look at them and immediately go YUK!! There are some exceptions. The Suzuki TU250, the Honda CB1100, and several cruisers. I have ridden cruisers most of my life, and admit I like them. But todays Japanese cruisers seem to be nothing but copies of Harleys, which I also like. But I would prefer to buy the real thing instead of a copy. The TU250 is too small, I am seriously considering the CB1100. After tax refund time I could pay cash for one. But I can't make that decision until I find out what the riding position is like. I may wind up going with another cruiser, unless someone does import something like this Yamaha.
  20. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    I'll keep an eye on the 2 SR500s on ebay right now and let ya know what they sell for. Maybe they will break $5k? Maybe not?