NikonsAndVStroms Photography Thread

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by NikonsAndVStroms, Feb 25, 2010.

  1. NikonsAndVStroms

    NikonsAndVStroms Beastly Photographer

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    It'll be a 105-300 on DX, the downside is the D7100 has a small buffer so if you're shooting RAW you'll only get about 5ish shots per burst before it slows down. But the AF does cover more of the frame than the D700/D4.
  2. Adelphos

    Adelphos Been here awhile

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    I loved my D7100 while I had it. Never once had a problem with the buffer. Even shooting sports. Just be deliberate about it and don't spray and pray. Less photos to throw out later that way ha
  3. NikonsAndVStroms

    NikonsAndVStroms Beastly Photographer

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    Composition wise the big thing is just giving a little more space for the elements in it. The rug comes awfully close to the bottom edge of the frame so a little bit more would help. As would a small amount more on the left side.

    The other thing to possibly do is get lower as you have a pretty standard perspective here, getting close to the ground could look cool.... though I'm not sure I'd want to be contorting myself in front of the tomb of the unknown soldier. If it was drier and you could just sit down that would be a good way to do it.
  4. LexLeroy

    LexLeroy Chief Mansplainer

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    Barrel distortion? The seam in the concrete above the far edge of the mat appears to bow downward as well, although not to the extent of the near edge.
  5. NikonsAndVStroms

    NikonsAndVStroms Beastly Photographer

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    Good eye, it's an easy fix in lightroom but you'll lose even more of that edge.
  6. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    Help me understand why there is not too much negative space in this photo. Close to half (if not more) is sky, and not very dramatic.
    Just trying to learn..... :ear
  7. NikonsAndVStroms

    NikonsAndVStroms Beastly Photographer

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    For my work it's not so much negative space because I have a running theme of clouds through a lot of it:

    [​IMG]
    (One of the more dramatic examples)

    Though you're right in that it would have been stronger being closer to street level, it was taken from my hotel (I think 3rd floor) in Tel Aviv so angling it down would just create distortion so that wasn't an option. Sometimes you're just stuck with what you've got and need to make the strongest image possible.

    Since the highest bit up top didn't have much to it I took it down to an 8x10 (I try to keep my work in 3:2 4:3 or 4:5/8:10):

    [​IMG]
  8. flyrod

    flyrod Been here awhile

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    Nachtflug,

    Some of us still print pictures. My wife and I do and used to do a lot more.

    One of the first photo printers is an Epson 1270 that is quite old and still
    in use.

    [​IMG]

    then went to an Epson 2200 that is still used for test prints, mostly from scans

    [​IMG]

    Then went to Epson 2400 that my wife uses a lot still

    [​IMG]

    Then to Epson 4880 for roll paper & canvas

    [​IMG]

    Then to Epson 7600 - 24" for roll paper and canvas

    [​IMG]

    All are still in use weekly. They allow us to do things like this,
    Collage for my Dads passing 2 years ago, I made 50 copies for friends and
    family

    [​IMG]

    Small print from Italy with shop made spalted ash frame I made in my shop

    [​IMG]

    And this 20 x 30 Quake lake in Montana print

    [​IMG]

    My wife did a lot of macro work. Nielsen aluminum frames, archival matte
    that we cut on our large mat cutter. She has sold many images as have I.

    [​IMG]

    More

    [​IMG]

    We do our own canvas wraps, I make the stretcher frames in the shop.
    They are very expensive to sub out so we do it ourselves.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Doing our own prints allows us to print the way we want. It has been a
    sometimes frustrating experience but much less expensive and we enjoy
    the process. It is like watching a print come to life in a tray in the darkroom, just the modern version. The only prints we sub out are on metal or a medium we are not familiar with. I will print my own till the day
    I die.

    [​IMG]

    Best regards to all,

    Flyrod
  9. thumperpilot

    thumperpilot Thumper Pilot

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    :drif

    .
  10. NikonsAndVStroms

    NikonsAndVStroms Beastly Photographer

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    :becca:becca:kboom

    I've got a love/hate relationship with that beast (edit: just noticed yours is the 4880, we had the 4800 IIRC), I've made hundreds of prints with it and they're great BUT leave it idle for a month and you've got an hour of cleaning. If it's left idle all summer :eek1

    Just seeing that brings back some painful memories of deadlines and clogged nozzles.

    Have you had issues? And how's the 7600 worked out for you? If I got one I'd be getting one of their smaller models (probably closer to the 4800 in size) I'm wary of getting a printer myself since I wouldn't use it too often and the cleaning/wasted ink cleaning it took to get the one at the school working.
  11. NikonsAndVStroms

    NikonsAndVStroms Beastly Photographer

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    I especially like the one in the middle of the next to last row on the right:

    [​IMG]

    :D
  12. flyrod

    flyrod Been here awhile

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    As you can tell, I am a huge fan of Epson printers. I have tried to always
    run something once every week or two through all to avoid clogged jets.

    I have not been doing that of late. I have gone as much as a month without turning one on and may have to run one cycle to clear.

    The 4880 has been great and makes wonderful prints. Mine may be newer
    than the one you used? At 90.00 a cartridge, it should be used as cleaning
    wastes some ink. Very few issues with this printer. Hardest part is calibrating monitors so prints turn out like image on monitor. We have
    calibrated all and sometimes prints are still a little dark. Usually very close.

    I bought the 7600 5 years or so ago and it makes great prints. It is used
    less than the 4880, at one point I realized it had been months. I turned it
    on expecting a lengthy cleaning and made a small test print that was
    perfect. Previous owner said he had left it sit for 4 months and then printed
    with only one cleaning cycle. Cartridges are even more for it as I use the
    largest size available.

    They are wonderful printers and I think they are better than the competition in all regards. We used to sell some prints in a few shops and
    at fairs, etc. To sub out all of our print work may be less money but no
    real control over what you get. I like to print as much as taking the shot
    and post processing. It is nice to see what you have done all in house.

    I used to do all my own darkroom work as well and still have a darkroom
    in the house. I have had a darkroom since I was 14. Never got above
    11 x 14 prints but made many. Only black and white.

    Sorry to be so long with reply but it is easy to ramble on when talking
    about a passion.

    Regards,

    Flyrod
  13. flyrod

    flyrod Been here awhile

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    I will take some better shots of some of my wife's macro work. She is a
    perfectionist unlike myself.

    Some of her best work was done with an Olympus 8080 in macro. We went
    through Olympus from 5050 to 8080 and beyond and I still have them and
    think they were great cameras.

    I was a Minolta fan back in the 60's and went from srt to Maxxums and
    acquired a lot of Maxxum lenses. Glad I saved them because when Sony
    came out with the a100, I had 20 or lenses for it. Now using a a7 and a700
    Sony. Great cameras and under rated in my opinion. I recently bought a
    rx100 from an inmate since I bought my wife one and have been jealous
    until I got my own. Great little camera.

    I also went from Mamiya 645 and rb to all Pentax 645 for medium format.
    It took me 10 years but I have every lens made for the Pentax 645 system
    and three bodies. Still have my Poaroid 600 se with both Mamiya lenses
    made for it as well and an old tlr Rollei. Then there is the 4 x 5 madness
    as well. I sold most of it but kept the Bender cherry 4 x 5 that I made from
    a kit and the carbon fiber Toyo 4 x 5 that I used to pack for hikes and such.

    I am worse with flyrods - lost count at 25 or so, some old bamboo and
    still have the Fenwick fiberglass rod that was my first in 1965. I think I
    have a sickness but don't know what it is called.

    Fun though and I get pleasure from having and using all.

    Best,

    Flyrod
  14. NikonsAndVStroms

    NikonsAndVStroms Beastly Photographer

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    You're worse than me with bodies and lenses :lol3 that takes talent :thumb

    And the Sony's are great cameras, how's she liking the A7?

    Just a general note for everyone if you have good lighting smaller sensor cameras like these can be really good especially if you don't need to enlarge to an exceptionally large size. The benefit is that with the smaller sensor you're using a smaller lens for an effective focal length so you get a much bigger depth of field. When all I could physically use was a point and shoot I did a lot of macro work with it and they came out great and are fine to 16x20, possibly more but that's the largest I've pushed them.

    When I was in really bad shape I did "studio" work with my point and shoot which had no manual settings except ISO, a piece of black background paper, and a LL Bean hat with LED's in the brim :lol3 so even if you don't have the best gear just be inventive. You'll also get a greater understanding of the basics for when you move onto more capable cameras....then the challenge becomes not losing the skills you picked up since it's all so much easier.
  15. flyrod

    flyrod Been here awhile

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    Take a look at my wife's gallery at;

    www.lauriedailyphotography.com

    I would like to say I taught her everything she knows but it would be a
    stretch. She has a great eye and is great with photoshop, tiffen filter plug
    ins, etc.

    She is a third grade teacher and has been most of her life except for a
    wood working stint in my shop for 10 years or so when our kids were young.

    My gallery is at www.dailydesigns.smugmug.com and nowhere near as
    nice as hers.

    My old gallery which was mostly wiped out during a computer crisis is at
    www.dailydesigns.net I just started smugmug account recently.

    Flyrod
  16. flyrod

    flyrod Been here awhile

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    Sorry, she is using the A77 and I am using the A700. She and I both love
    the cameras especially since I have so many lenses for them. Of course, we have purchased several new lenses as well as the old maxxum lenses.

    The a100 was first, then a700 that I use and then a77 for her to upgrade and have live view which she uses a lot for macro. I will probably buy
    her an a7 for her birthday in June as it is full frame and next step up. We have too many cameras to keep track.

    I should sell some but they are hard to part with.

    Flyrod
  17. GSWayne

    GSWayne Old Guy nOOb

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    Between your woodworking and your photographs, I bet it is fun to see people's reactions when they first visit your house and think they are in some kind of museum. :bow
  18. flyrod

    flyrod Been here awhile

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    I will take that as a compliment. When I go to someone's shop or house,
    I pretty much know the person. What we surround ourselves with is a window into our being.

    I love to be surrounded by things that give me visual pleasure. I love to look at something I made or photographed or participated in and make me
    remember the time and place.

    All we have is the past as we know not the future. We have to live passionate lives else we are mundane. Whatever I have done I remember fondly. Even when things were bad, being busy was always the best therapy. Idle hands and all.

    Too bad my vocation gets in the way of my avocations.

    Tight lines, clean cuts, f16 to all,

    Flyrod
  19. Dismount

    Dismount Boring bastard

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    Got a couple i liked yesterday.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  20. NikonsAndVStroms

    NikonsAndVStroms Beastly Photographer

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    I really like the top one, and I like the out of focus ones in the background I just wish they weren't directly behind the sharp plants.

    For the bottom one again great shot, the crop is a little abrupt and this would probably be best in portrait orientation. As it is I'd crop it down to a 4x5 ratio, it's in that weird space of not being centered, but not being towards the end. With that crop you can play around with the positioning and see what looks best.