northwet??

Discussion in 'Pacific Northwet - Where it's green. And wet.' started by wizze, Aug 12, 2013.

  1. wizze

    wizze Wizze = Wise

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    Wife and I are taking a HUGE leap and heading for greener coasts in the seattle Tacoma up to Bellingham area to look for work and shelter. Where are the run for your lives type places? We'll have a few kids (bikes) that we need to make accomodations for. Also looking for work. She is medical x ray and cat scan tech. I do pharmaceutical manufacturing and industrial maintenance.

    Any points, tips or tricks would be appreciated Thanks!
    #1
  2. guns_equal_freedom

    guns_equal_freedom Long timer

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    Bellingham has a booming medical community.
    Lots of old people and Canadians.
    #2
  3. One Fat Roach

    One Fat Roach honey badger

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    +5
    St Joseph's Hospital and any related medical buildings is practically a gold mine.
    Mom and sister both work in that field as well
    #3
  4. caslaw

    caslaw Pig Wrestler

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    Portland, OR
    And lots of pharmaceutical manufacturing too - LOL. :wink:
    #4
  5. XR4EVER

    XR4EVER 919 excuses to ride!

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    You might want to take second and check out the dry side, too. Look up Kootenai Health here in northern ID. I moved here 10 years ago from your neck of the woods (Boyertown, PA) and haven't looked back. WA is run by a bunch of Nazis compared to ID! :amazon
    My wife is in the medical field and keeps her WA license "just in case" but would hate life if she had to work over there.
    Just my $.02, and welcome!

    BTW, how did you manage to get the XCW plated in PA? I gave up on that process, and it was one of the final straws that forced my move out here.
    #5
  6. wizze

    wizze Wizze = Wise

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    Good info. May consider Spokane area again. Coeur d'Alene is too hard to spell. :lol3

    XR4EVER sent you a message.
    #6
  7. JanLD

    JanLD Jan in Sammamish

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    I live in the Eastside Seattle metro area and have family members in the medical field. They work at Overlake and Swedish facilities. It seems like the job prospects are good here.

    I commute to work in downtown Seattle on my bike -- the nice thing about west of the Cascades, we don't get much snow so I can ride year-round. Yeah, it rains here some - but you don't melt, right?

    Jan
    #7
  8. John E Davies

    John E Davies Runs at Mouth Adventurer

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    Location:
    Spokane, WA USA
    Spokane was just voted fifth best city by Outside Magazine ... http://www.outsideonline.com/advent...tates/Best-Towns-2013-Spokane-Washington.html

    and there are a ton of medical related jobs here - and Providence Hospital is finishing up a new medical center in Spokane Valley, so they should be hiring: ... http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2012/sep/05/providence-announces-expansion-into-valley/

    Cost of living is way less than in Puget Sound, housing is cheap, no crowds. I moved here eleven years ago and whenever I go back to the Wet Side, I hate it and can't wait to get away......

    There are 4,000 miles of unpaved roads in Spokane County alone and ten times that many within a 50 mile radius of Coeur d'Alene. If I were to move, it would be 20 miles further east into Idaho.
    #8
  9. shojimon

    shojimon Been here awhile

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    Olalla, WA
    I live in the west Puget Sound-Kitsap county. It used to be quiet thirty years ago. Now it is getting over run. The dry side east of the Cascades, or Spokane- or Idaho would be my choice. One thing about the wet side- you may get claustrophobia- unless you are in a developed area or on the water there is a wall of trees at the roads edge. And you won't see through them either-the underbrush is thick. So riding on the FS roads, you will be riding for the most part in a tunnel of trees with no view. Yes, I know there are exceptions, but when I moved out here from the East coast thirty years ago it was one of the things that really struck me. I was used to being able to see into and through the forest.
    #9
  10. XR4EVER

    XR4EVER 919 excuses to ride!

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    #10
  11. what broke now

    what broke now Petroleum Brother

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    All because of those dang French beaver catchers! Don't blame it on the Indians.
    #11
  12. Ladybug0048

    Ladybug0048 Bug Sister

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    Location:
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    There are pros and cons everywhere. If you are looking at Idaho and Eastern WA one thing to consider is Idaho has state income tax and Washington doesn't. Sales tax is higher in WA than Idaho.

    I live in Spokane Valley and like it just because that's what I'm used to. :D One of the things I like is we have a lot more blue sky than the Seattle area does but we have more snow too.

    Do some looking around and you will find the place to call home.

    Let us all know where you end up so you can start making friends with the local ADVers, there are some great people in the beautiful PNWet.
    #12
  13. woodsrider-boyd

    woodsrider-boyd Wow, these guys are fast

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    WA
    From NJ, moved here 20 yrs ago, to the wet side. Have STILL not adjusted to the gloomy weather. I freaking hate it.

    Scenary? World class. Off road riding? World class. Weather? SUCKS. You get 2-3 months of decent summer weather if you're lucky. The rest of the year you're living in gray gloomy drizzle.

    Traffic blows too.

    Other then that, its pretty awesome.

    As soon as my youngest is off to college I AM THE HELL OUT OF HERE.

    I CAN'T WAIT! -Ed

    Edit: I should ad that people are generally very friendly and courteous which is a nice change up from the gruff east coast demeanor (which never bothered me anyway).
    #13
  14. Gootch

    Gootch Been here awhile

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    Olympia, WA
    What has happened to westsiders? Everyone is getting too welcoming (maybe it's because you ain't from round here). We normally say that there are no jobs, housing is freaking expensive (which in many places it is, including Bellingham), it rains every day - except when it's only very cloudy and depressing, and traffic is miserable. That's the real northwest way to sell the place.
    #14
  15. Ladybug0048

    Ladybug0048 Bug Sister

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    Spokane Valley, WA (the dry side of the mountains)
    The others are trying to off load their houses so they can move so they have to say the west side is awesome, they are hoping to get lucky. :lol3
    #15
  16. Idarider

    Idarider R1200GS

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    We just say "Welcome to Idaho, now go home" :D
    #16
  17. Sabre

    Sabre PrĂȘt? Allez!

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    Don't know if you saw this recent thread asking a similar question. For your convenience, my opinion about the climate is attached, below. It doesn't address the socioeconomic or cultural scenes out here. In general, the wet side of the Cascades enjoys higher salaries but the cost of living is a fair bit higher. Along the I-5 corridor, south of Olympia is the least expensive living, but opportunities are fewer. I'd strongly consider looking at life in the Portland area...it's a great city that is central to an amazing array of both professional and recreational opportunities. The greater Tacoma/Seattle/Everett area has some interesting stuff happening, but I could absolutely never tolerate any commuting in these areas. It wouldn't be bad if you could avoid commuting, however. North of Everett, the Skagit Valley is one of the most lovely places out there, but, again, it's small town USA. Lots of folks enjoy living there and commute south to Everett or Seattle. The Bellingham area has a good-sized university and, yes, lots of healthcare (my field). Be warned, however, that the cost of living in this area is ridiculously overinflated. You pay to be in the paradise that is a 90-minute drive to Seattle, a 60-minute drive to Vancouver, BC, and a short hop to the Cascades or to the San Juan islands.

    Like many areas, the quality of education varies quite a bit. I've moved twice now with school-aged kids and both times made my decision of location based upon the school district; educational quality varies surprisingly even within our county. A lot of this info is available online.

    I can't compare employment opportunities here with what you folks are seeing in eastern PA these days. I wouldn't make a leap without really being sure about the career thing. I would differ strongly with the notion that Bellingham is a sure bet for healthcare. The hospital is suffering tremendous financial and administrative pains and I can't encourage anyone to consider working there.

    BTW, I grew up in the Washington, DC area and on the Jersey shore, but have lived out here for most of my adult life. Here's the weather editorial I wrote for the other thread:

    <snip>
    The eastern two-thirds of Washington really should be a different state; the dry side is pretty much on a different planet. The wet side is why we're The Evergreen State. Most locals agree that this isn't because of the conifers that abound, but rather because of the mildew and moss that cling to every house, fence, and slow-moving vehicle. Here are some additional thoughts on our weather for potential residents contemplating a move.

    Cloud cover: gray and formless. Not lovely, white, puffy clouds like most of the country. Just gray. A dim void overhead. Take vitamin D3. No kidding. And when we get the odd sunny day during the winter and spring months, we go kind of crazy, get rather giddy, do silly things, babble a great deal; it's a kind of happy hysteria.

    Cloud cover #2, our skin: We are by nature fishbelly white if of the Caucasian persuasion. This leads to a couple of interesting endemic phenomena. There are those folks who sport oddly deep tans during the winter months. They tend to be realtors and other people who drive large SUVs. They spend a great deal of time on tanning beds and can always be relied upon to tell you about their mid-winter trip to Maui. Gold jewelry accompanies this phenomenon. When they retire, they spend half the year in Arizona and half the year at the dermatologist's office. The other local tradition is for the fishbelly folk to strip down whenever the sun comes out, frantically absorbing as much UV radiation as possible. When the Great Blazing Orb In The Sky favors us with an appearance of a few days' duration, you can count on seeing a lot of people at the grocery store who are sporting dramatic sunburns. These contrast startlingly with the glaring white patterns caused by their tank tops and sunglasses.

    Rainfall: drizzle. Not great gully-washers and toad-stranglers like most of the country. Just constant, omnipresent drizzle. Throw on the GoreTex and do your thing. We don't use umbrellas much. If you stay inside because it's raining, you will soon sink into the depths of a depression such as any amount of alcohol and/or God won't help. In fact, they just make it worse. Rainfall is never measured in inches as in other parts of the country; we measure it by weeks.

    Rainfall #2, Soil Stability: we have none. Every third house is built on an unstable slope, and virtually every mile of Burlington Northern Santa Fe track is at the base of a potential mudslide. Homes routinely slide downhill, although, since everyone expects this, no one is ever killed by it. Savvy folks always have their video cameras primed and ready to capture their neighbor's home plunging down onto the railroad tracks below and, happily, the neighbors always make it out alive and manage to rescue their chihuahua, which makes for great television. Don't plan on any meaningful amount of rail traffic during these months as the tracks are constantly under repair.

    Rainfall #3, Rivers: An odd thing is that the locals who live in these amazingly fertile river valleys don't seem to understand why the soil is so fertile. Two out of three people actually have hands-on experience making a sand bag levee. Anyway, it makes for great television.

    Daylight: Hey, we're at a higher latitude than Maine, folks. When the Winter Solstice hits, you ride to work in darkness and you come home in same. Get a full-spectrum light and have the family sit around it for breakfast and dinner. No kidding. But then...the daylight starts to return and when that Summer Solstice hits it's amazing. We're all sleep deprived because we stay out playing until 10:30 pm and the sunlight streaming in our windows wakes us up at 5:30 the next morning. And we know that as soon as summer starts, the days will start shrinking back away from us, so we frantically try to cram as much sun worship as we can into those precious months. Of course, there's the big tease factor: the endless month of Juneuary tests our patience as we wait for the rain to stop and the temps to rise somewhere in early August.

    Temperatures: There's a reason that the stereotypical northwesterner is depicted wearing (a) an Eddie Bauer vest and Pendleton plaid shirt if a Star-Bellied Sneetch or (b) a hoodie if of the plain-bellied variety. Of course, the flip side of the cool temp thing is that it rarely gets very cold. We enjoy the interesting phenomenon of the plain-bellied Sneetches wearing shorts and flip-flops year-round. Very classy. Very few homes have air conditioning, and people start keeling over when temps exceed the mid-seventies. Interestingly, we complain all year about how cold and miserable we are, and when we occasionally hit 80 degrees we go on endlessly about how hot and miserable we are. Let's just say that it's "cool temperate" around here. Bring your fleece.

    Snowfall: Oh Jesus, native northwesterners are positively hazardous when the snow occasionally flies. In fairness, it's a very wet and slippery snow, none of that dry, crunchy stuff that actually allows for some traction. But an inch of snow will bring us to our knees much as it does our nation's capital. Schools close, government shuts down, essential services are cut off, food banks run dry, the governor urges us all to stay home and shelter in place, relying upon our disaster supplies until the emergency has passed. Happily, these snow events are rare; we often go years without any white stuff on the ground. When it does come, the media refers to it as "Blizzard '99" or "Superstorm '02" or something ominous like that. Of course, if there comes more than an inch or two, it becomes "Winter Disaster Crisis '06." Then, when we get a few snowfalls during the same winter, they carve that year into the big granite slab of collective memory as one of those winters to be remembered and handed down to our children. Seriously, folks, just stay off the roads if there's any snow. The ditches are littered with Subarus and lifted 4x4s whose drivers, every time it snows, seem to forget that steering and braking are not aided by four wheel drive.

    Wind: It blows here sometimes. We do occasionally see hurricane-force winds. Travel near the coast and you'll see all these signs proclaiming "Large-Scale Wind Disaster Deforestation Wipeout 1996, Replanted 1998." Unfortunately, because the ground is constantly saturated with water during the wet and windy months between November and Juneuary, the nightly entertainment on the evening news includes endless helicopter shots of lovely homes with large conifers lying across them. Sadly, at least ten or twenty times each winter, one of these big trees squashes some poor dude on his way to the mailbox. Bad luck for him.

    Natural Disasters: Happily, we're free from hurricanes, tornadoes, typhoons and electrical storms. You will be perfectly safe if you live in a mobile home. Bear in mind that we do get the occasional stroke of lightning and distant rumble of thunder. Although you may only see this once in five years or so, you are well-advised to use quality power strips with overvoltage protection for your electronics. Although these will address the infrequent power surge as a result of lightning, they're much more useful in the winter as power lines are virtually continuously being hit by trees and knocked over by dim-witted drivers, resulting in constant brownouts and dramatic flares of light as a few hundred extra volts surge through your home. Now for the bad news: at some point you may be entirely wiped off the map by a volcanic eruption, major earthquake, and/or tsunami. This is virtually guaranteed, and the anticipation is killing us.

    Everyone knows a family who was here visiting in August, fell in love with our coffee and decided to move here. Unfortunately for them, they didn't really understand all of the lifestyle implications of the above-described weather and they now suffer miserably and/or stumble about in stunned disbelief, asking over and over how we deal with the suffocating claustrophobia of living under a wet rock. We all chuckle at this and yet feel truly sorry for them, much as we secretly envy our friends and family members who are able to somehow find their escape and live the Arizona Sunshine Dream.

    Many folks will smile and tell you that the weather doesn't bother them a bit or even that they love the weather here. They're full of shit.
    #17
  18. One Fat Roach

    One Fat Roach honey badger

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    Lol. Saber. Hands down one of the best descriptions I've ever read of the PNW.

    BRAVO

    :clap :lol3:rofl
    #18
  19. michaelyogi

    michaelyogi Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2010
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    282
    Location:
    Eastslope North Casacdes, WA
    Makes me glad I live in Eastern Washington.

    </snip>
    #19
  20. kimel

    kimel I hit what?

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2010
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    Location:
    The Palouse, Washington State
    Excellent prose! And accurate! Glad I live on the dry side.
    #20