nwgs motorhome addiction and therapy thread

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by nwgs, May 20, 2009.

  1. nwgs

    nwgs solarfied

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2006
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    35,002
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    anywhere and everywhere
    Makes total sense.

    Not much different than a home. It is what you make it.

    We had an ECU for the Allison go out this year. Luckily in an RV park.

    New they were 2k found a used one for 1k.

    Not quite like a boat but sometimes it feels like it.
  2. svs

    svs All Hands on Deck!

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2005
    Oddometer:
    25,792
    Location:
    Huntington Beach

    They are like Boats... I go to West Marine for supplies as much as I do Camping World..

    Nice find on a replacement ECU...

    We use our rig year round, take advantage of where we live Mountains, Deserts, Lakes, Rivers, The Beach... Best part is it's an activity with family and friends... One of the best things we do is go out and live life..

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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  3. Lurch II

    Lurch II Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2001
    Oddometer:
    612
    Location:
    Vermont, USA
    Surprise surprise. This little rig followed me home. Nothing like jumping into the deep end of the pool. Never hauled anything this big and have never tried RV camping (always been in tents or motel rooms). So here goes. 2007 Cyclone, 12 foot garage for the two R1200GS, king bed for fun, two slides, gas station, two AC's. In pretty good shape - a little rust around the rear door ramp, but one owner who took good care of it. So now we begin the learning process. Towing with a new F350 diesel set up for towing a 5th wheel.

    [​IMG]

    Damn its big!

    [​IMG]
  4. svs

    svs All Hands on Deck!

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    Yeah it's BIG... Have fun..:clap
  5. McNeal

    McNeal Long timer

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    Dec 4, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,776
    I've got one suggestion which I found valuable when starting to tow my 5th wheel. Load your truck like you would when heading out. Extra wood in the bed? Bikes? Coolers full of beer? Take the truck to some Cat scales and have it weighed. Then hook up the 5th wheel and way the combined rig. This gives you a good baseline to understand how the load is distributed, how much headroom you've got on the trucks GVW and the trailers.

    The trucks today have an amazing capacity to haul, but you need to take everything into account. Especially the tires. What you might be able to get away with for a short 5 mile trip would be extremely dangerous to make a 500 mile run in a single day.

    If you've already thought about this stuff please ignore this post and enjoy your RV.
  6. Lurch II

    Lurch II Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2001
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    Vermont, USA
    Good advice that I have received from several sources. Because there is just the two of us we won't be loading heavy but I do want to validate the weight distribution. The dry weight of this rig is 12,300, GVWR is 18K. I don't expect to get close to GVWR but wouldn't be surprised to find we're near 16K heading out. The F350 will tow it but you also have to be able to stop it! :evil
  7. PaddedHat

    PaddedHat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2010
    Oddometer:
    732
    I see this comment a lot. With a decent brake controller, (at least a Prodigy and NEVER a $49 pedulum controller) and properly adjusted brakes, the trailer is perfectly capable of stopping without pushing the truck. That said, the shitbag marketing folks have convinced most trailer owners that the only thing you ever need to do to maintain the wheel/ axle/ brake/ hub assembly is to check air pressure and squirt a shit ton of grease into the magic zerk fitting on the end of the spindle of the wonderful "easy-lube" axles. The brakes are 1940s technology shoes that need to be manually adjusted. The easy-lube axles are typically overfilled, and overpresurized with grease on a used rig. This WILL blow grease past the worthless "double lip" seal and centrifuge it all over the interior of the drum assembly. The end result is that a huge percentage of recreational trailers are heading down the road with grease blown all over the inside of the drums, and brakes that have never been adjusted. On used trailers I have spent an afternoon with a few cans of brake clean and an brake adjusting spoon and ended up with a rig that went from barely stopping, to one that felt like you dropped anchor when you touched the brakes.

    Nice rig you have there, enjoy!
  8. Lurch II

    Lurch II Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2001
    Oddometer:
    612
    Location:
    Vermont, USA
    I'll be doing a comprehensive inspection on the brakes before we go much beyond the parking lot. I'll be using the builtin Ford brake controller unless it proves deficient.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
  9. andy29847

    andy29847 Dirt Road Rider

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2003
    Oddometer:
    2,433
    Location:
    South Carolina
    My wife and I are also new RVers

    [​IMG]

    We took our first camping trip last month - 2600 miles from South Carolina to Junction, TX. We loved traveling with the trailer, and wished we had bought an RV 20 years ago.

    The most awkward thing for me was finding somewhere to buy fuel. At most of the truck stops, the fuel islands are nasty, and the nozzles are too big for your pickup. I also found that most of the normal gas stations had lots too small for my truck and trailer. I loved the fuel stops where the station had an RV island.

    All of my friends told me I would have a shitty experience with the dump tank. I thought I was smarter than they are, and could avoid the mess. It didn't work out that way. :rofl Carry some latex gloves for the dirty work.

    I was surprised how much nicer our trip was made by the ability to stop at an exit or rest area, fix our own food, and use our own bathroom.

    Join the Good Sam Club. The discount on stuff from Camping World will more than pay for the cost of membership. We also used the Good Sam web site to print a trip itinerary that listed the possible fuel stops, camp grounds, and Camping World stores along the way.

    My dogs loved camping.

    [​IMG]

    I am sure you have been told - check the tires on your trailer. The age of the tires mean almost as much as the wear on them.

    Don't drive too fast (we drove 62-65 mph).

    Traffic pics:
    Crossing the Mississippi:
    [​IMG]

    Houston:
    [​IMG]

    Your tax dollars at work:
    [​IMG]

    My dog was amazed at the Atchafalaya Basin Bridge (18.2 miles):
    [​IMG]
    Have fun!!
  10. Big Bird 928

    Big Bird 928 Long timer

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    While this is all true, I insist on my trailers and truck to be able to stop the whole load independantly of each other for those cases that there is a failure on the other. Yes, this means that I am one that will put brakes on every axle of the trailer, heck my single ATV flatbed trailer has brakes on it. When I go to order trailers or parts to build one the person behind the desk hates the work that has to be done.
  11. Lurch II

    Lurch II Been here awhile

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    Jul 6, 2001
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    612
    Location:
    Vermont, USA
    Tires will probably be the first big expense. This is a triple axel and the tires are 2008 and 2009 vintage. Sidewalls are good - no cracks - and they have been covered but before any long trips I'll probably want to replace them. For this summer we're planning on just local camping trips to get used to this rig so the longest trip might be 150-200 miles and we'll be slow and easy. Sorta spent all my money on a new truck and trailer so new tires are probably next year's buy.
  12. TheOtherBart

    TheOtherBart Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
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    Location:
    DeKalb County, Illinois
    I'm going to be buying an RV in the next year and am looking for some advice. Not having any experience with them (other than riding around in one as a kid) my first inclination was to buy a relatively young used Class C from a dealer. I figured that would insulate me a little from the bullshit and hidden problems that would be more likely when buying from a private seller, but it would also mean spending a pretty good chunk of change because from what I've seen dealers don't seem to handle anything more than four or five years old.

    But I just found out that my wife's cousin is selling an older Shasta for very low money. I don't know any details yet about model, size, or features, but the one exterior picture I saw looks like your typical 80's era motorhome. Being in the family I have a little more confidence that I'll get a complete picture of what problems it may have, and AAA RV coverage is pretty reasonable to take care of the possibility that something goes wrong out on the road. What should I be looking at to decide if this thing is worth dropping the money on?
  13. PirateJohn

    PirateJohn Banned

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    22,219
    Location:
    Uvalde, TX

    Take a photo or three and post them here. Folks will try to help but a one size fits all answer doesn't really do justice when talking about RV's. :deal
  14. natedog39

    natedog39 Borderline Beefcake

    Joined:
    May 10, 2009
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    6,580
    Location:
    ravena new york
    I got my new combination together for the first time yesterday.

    I was so sick of being a moving chicane on hills I decided to to go big or go home.

    Got torque?

    [​IMG]
  15. Lurch II

    Lurch II Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2001
    Oddometer:
    612
    Location:
    Vermont, USA
    Nice big rig.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
  16. sailwing2003

    sailwing2003 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    402
    Location:
    Pantego (DFW) TX
    Lots of talk about tires. Get the trailer on a CAT scale, is the best way to understand what to do about air pressures. A richer, experienced, excellent rider, racer, truck company owner has told me, no tires over 5 years old on trailers. He pointed out my date codes, not the great tread remaining. He says we can shop tires here at home, so easily. When they come apart on the road, they can do so much wheelwell and body damage that it becomes an insurance claim. Blow outs put us at huge risks on small two lane roads with poor shoulders. Then we are down, need likely a complete set, in an area with possibly limited supply.

    The trailer forums have lots of threads about tire nightmares. Plus trailer manufacturers using the wrong load rated tires on new units, that often get overloaded. Salesmen have been said to mislead buyers with how light the trailer is, and how much the truck will pull.
  17. sailwing2003

    sailwing2003 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    402
    Location:
    Pantego (DFW) TX
    Wed. we closed on the new to us, 1998 Foretravel U295, 36' coach. Just spent our 3rd night, drove home yesterday, got to within 3 miles of the house, and got a very nice campsite next to friends that fulltime. Dear wife does not want to go home! Today we will swing by to get food and refer. things, and head for the warehouse to load everything from the last coach and spend the weekend gone. Guess we need to list the house next week.
  18. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2010
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    6,797
    Location:
    Barrie Ont

    This... I've owned a couple of class C's, no expert, but from that experience and talking with 100s of other owners, I have a pretty keen eye looking at one from 50 ft to tell if it'll be a money pit.

    Take pics of the cab, over head bunk area....
  19. TheOtherBart

    TheOtherBart Long timer

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    Location:
    DeKalb County, Illinois
    Will do as soon as I can, waiting to hear back from him.
  20. andy29847

    andy29847 Dirt Road Rider

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2003
    Oddometer:
    2,433
    Location:
    South Carolina
    I have read many threads on the Escapees Forum about finding a BIG truck to use to tow 5th wheelers. You should rule on the highway.

    [​IMG]


    I have a silly ass question. It looks like you tow your trailer with you roof ladder in place. I left mine at home on my first trip. I would store it in the garage if I was going to take it along. What are your thoughts about the ladder? Why take it along? Should it be stored inside?