Ohlins Rear Shock on F800GS

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by peter_sd, Apr 24, 2009.

  1. peter_sd

    peter_sd Adventurer

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    Has anyone put a Ohlins rear shock on there bike yet ? I just did the Ohlins front fork springs now looking to do the rear shock.
    #1
  2. Adamski

    Adamski n00b

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    it works very good, but there is no really big different from the stock accept adjustments and the price tag. I'm 100 kg and for the normal road use I had to set to max all adjustments because it was to soft for me.
    #2
  3. never.ride

    never.ride Been here awhile

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    How are you liking the new front springs?
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  4. peter_sd

    peter_sd Adventurer

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    I like them so far dont get the front end dive when braking like i used to. i am taking it off road tomorrow so i will find out how well they do.
    #4
  5. peter_sd

    peter_sd Adventurer

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    I am around 250 pounds so the stock rear is to soft so. The shop i am getting the shock from is getting it direct from Ohlins so it should be build to my weight and how i ride.
    #5
  6. The Griz

    The Griz North Forest Rider

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    I might buy an Ohlins rear shock for the F800GS. Got a line on a great deal that I might not be able to pass up. Ohlins offers the shock in two types. The shocks are both the same, except one is with hydraulic preload adjuster and one is without. After looking at my F800GS, if I buy one, I might decide to save $150 and go with the non-hydraulic preload adjustable model. I don't have ABS, and I don't have the charcoal canister installed either. This leaves a large space around the shock and allows easy access for a preload adjuster tool. Also, I never do and never will ride this bike two up.

    I do, however, ride solo with or without luggage packed with gear. I travel light and fast though. I only pack the necessities. So when I'm packed up for a trip we're talking a weight addition of 30-40lbs tops. I could probably set the preload at a setting that would work well for both scenarios.


    Thoughts?
    #6
  7. ride2little

    ride2little MoveAlongNothingHere

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    Your reasoning is sound. I say go for the cheaper version without the hydraulic preload adjuster. Unless you're adding 100+ lbs, yo won't really need to tweak it anyway if you have the right spring to begin with.
    Keep us posted.
    #7
  8. The Griz

    The Griz North Forest Rider

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    That's my thought too. Thanks for the input!:D
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  9. The Griz

    The Griz North Forest Rider

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    That other thread is for the Ohlins fork cartridges. I'm asking about the Ohlins rear shock. Thought I'd post in the right place, keep things organized you know.

    Instead of starting a new thread that says "Ohlins rear shock F800GS", I thought I'd post in the thread that already exists.
    #9
  10. The Griz

    The Griz North Forest Rider

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    So I've searched high and low, and couldn't find any info on what the stock Sachs OEM rear shock design really is on this bike. So, I just put in a call to Racetech, who has been inside the stock Sachs unit. Here is what they have told me:

    The stock Sachs unit is an IFP shock. This means Internal Floating Piston, just like the Ohlins BM802:

    [​IMG]

    The fluid is put under gas pressure, and the gas and the fluid are kept apart by a separating piston. In this teeny little pic you can see the red floating piston that separates the blue nitrogen gas and the yellow oil. The green is the damping piston.

    This design is the same between both the Ohlins and the stock Sachs units for the F800GS.

    So, now I'm having trouble justifying the purchase of the Ohlins shock, being it's design is pretty much the same as the stock Sachs unit.

    Someone convince me otherwise!:D
    #10
  11. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    And I thought I nuked it.:scratch
    #11
  12. The Griz

    The Griz North Forest Rider

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    You wouldn't be able to nuke either of the Ohlins threads, since this one was created by "peter_sd", and the other one was created by me.


    Any advice on getting an Ohlins for the rear vs sticking with the stock Sachs.

    PS as a reminder, I have a Hyperpro progressive spring on the stock Sachs rear shock.

    Thanks.
    #12
  13. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    I can nuke my post on any thread unless somebody quoted it. Doesn't matter you probably owe me 1 or 3.

    Don't know nothing about the Ohlins except it is what Johngil had when he bent the bolt. Since he had it on the rear, I assume when he said never again he meant the shock

    I have the same set up as you on the rear and reasonably satisfied with it. Very good on pavement but not plush on the big stuff, but I try to stay away from that.

    Start improving one end and invariably you have to do the other if you want the bike balanced. Too rich for my blood.
    #13
  14. MTrider16

    MTrider16 Ridin' in MT

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    Sounds reasonable Griz. However, I'm going with the hydraulic preload.

    David.
    #14
  15. The Griz

    The Griz North Forest Rider

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    Thanks David. Hmmm. Hard to decide. Thanks for all the help though. And if anyone else has any insight it would be much appreciated!
    #15
  16. tmex

    tmex Long timer

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    Griz, the only two people I know who installed the Ohlin's shock had their frames replaced. I would be very careful.
    #16
  17. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    I thought these Sachs were not rebuildable. If Racetech has been inside the shock perhaps they can redo the valving to do what you want. They do advertise servicing Sachs shocks so it shouldn't be all that expensive.
    You be the test mule and if it works I will follow.
    #17
  18. The Griz

    The Griz North Forest Rider

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    Sasquatch will service the stock Sachs too:

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=654871
    #18
  19. johngil

    johngil Reseda, CA

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    Better buy an Indy kit if you go w/ the Ohlins.
    #19
  20. bxr140

    bxr140 Flame Bait

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    You can buy a Mercedes with four doors, four wheels, and a steering wheel.
    You can buy a Daewoo with the same specs.

    The floating piston doesn't mean much. That's pretty much the only option when there's not a remote reservoir, unless you go really low tech where the N2 and fluid are in the same chamber. When you strap on a remote can, a floating piston or a bladder are the choices, with the piston getting the performance nod.

    The O unit is more expensive specifically because it has more design in it, and the manufacturing is more involved. (Closer tolerances, more intricate piston ports, etc.). The Sachs is going to be more of a mass produced part. The Ohlins will function better across the range of travel and speeds, most noticibly at high speeds where flow management is crucial.

    In the end, a competent suspension tech will be able to get the Sachs to 90% of the Ohlins...but as with many things in life, that last 10% is where you really want your suspension to perform. Only you can decide whether or not its worth it.
    #20