oil foaming in sight glass

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by TORQUEMONSTER, Jan 27, 2013.

  1. Wallowa

    Wallowa Long timer

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    Frothy needs definition and description...what was the color [as mentioned], what % was 'frothy' and then describe "whip up". These descriptors could be signs of differing causes...some serious, some of no concern.
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    When oil is drained, for grins, mix it vigorously and put as much as you can in glass jar. Let it stand for a few hours and then look for separation in the liquid or solids in the bottom.
    <o:p></o:p>
    Better yet send a sample to Blackstone Lab for analysis.
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    Oh yes, water does not always 'boil' at 212 degrees; sometimes [altitude] it boils at lower temps. Personally I have never had enough moisture enter an engine from atmospheric sources to create any visual changes in the oil....but then again I live in an arid part of the country. If an engine needs to periodically run to high temps to "burn off water vapor", then the engine is poorly designed...regardless of the style of riding. Just my take and of course I could be wrong.

    I am new to boxer motors and do not know if being overfilled will cause frothing due to rods churning up oil. If my engine oil was off color or frothed when I drained it...I would stop right there and send off a sample of oil for analysis.:wink:<?xml:namespace prefix = v ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" /><v:shape style="WIDTH: 11.25pt; HEIGHT: 11.25pt; VISIBILITY: visible; mso-wrap-style: square" id=Picture_x0020_1 type="#_x0000_t75" alt="0" o:spid="_x0000_i1025"><v:imagedata o:title="0" src="file:///C:\Users\Phillip\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_image001.gif"></v:imagedata></v:shape>
    <o:p></o:p>
    #21
  2. def

    def Ginger th wonder dog

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    :thumb

    You think your boxer uses too much oil and is cranky at cold start?

    Watch this...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=v3MBmS3APP0&feature=endscreen

    :eek1
    #22
  3. weeman

    weeman Adventurer

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    Beware off topic. I couldn't help but comment on the video. As a kid in the 50's and a Navy brat my family logged many air miles in a Super Connie. My father was a flight engineer on a Martin Mars (Hawaii) seaplane based in Alameda, Ca or Hawaii and when we moved it was either by plane or ship. Fun memories.
    #23
  4. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Love those blue pipes

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    Leaving your engine to idle for the sole purpose of warming the oil is inane. Just wait to do that maintenance chore until you have an opportunity for a ride. If it's the dead of winter and you won't be riding until spring then you're better off leaving the bike alone anyway.

    Best is to get back from a nice long ride, park the bike on the side-stand until the engine has cooled to the point you can hold your hand on the sump, then put it on the centerstand and drain the oil.
    #24
  5. Garba

    Garba n00b

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    Water could get past a badly seated round head gasket.Had it once on my R11..
    #25
  6. tagesk

    tagesk Tuscan rider

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    [​IMG]


    Sir,
    The air-cooled 1150 will overheat, fry the HES up front, and be dead if left to idle with no airflow over the heads of through the oil cooler.

    [TaSK]
    #26
  7. Dan-M

    Dan-M Long timer

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    This is it in a nutshell. Have seen it many times on short trip vehicles.

    No laboratories needed.
    #27
  8. Britome

    Britome Get Free

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    Foam=water. Have you done any water crossings?
    #28
  9. scooteraug02

    scooteraug02 Dog Rancher

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    Put it in the trash, especially if you have black mold around the seal.
    #29
  10. tvpierce

    tvpierce Been here awhile

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    As I understand it, the accepted best practice is to drain oil hot -- while contaminates are suspended in the fluid. That way most of the contaminates are expelled with the oil.

    To wait for particulate to settle out of oil you're about to drain seems misguided.
    #30
  11. def

    def Ginger th wonder dog

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    The seal is OK...no mold or fowl odors. The wax motor thing did take out R11 and Q6 which have been replaced. The wax motor is the improved version with the black shaft.

    R52 burned. I'm investigating the reason. The control board is being repaired and we'll spin up the gyros once the unit is back together. These are good machines.
    #31
  12. WindSailor

    WindSailor Been here awhile

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    +1

    If I remember correctly for the oil not to go into 'extreme duty' as per the manual, the bike has to run at operating temperature for at least 20 minutes.
    #32
  13. Wallowa

    Wallowa Long timer

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    Honestly in the decades that I have had motorcycles and other vehicles I do not believe that I could or have contaminated the oil by only making "short" trips...whatever the hell that is...less than 20 mins? Look unless you are at 100% humidity and make hundreds of 5-10 min engine start/runs...how much moisture from combustion could really accumulate to cause a frothing oil? Sorry I personally believe that is an old wives tale...but as always I could be wrong...:wink:
    #33
  14. Chat Lunatique

    Chat Lunatique aka El Gato Loco

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    Yeah, I gotta go with you on this one re foaming. Short trips will fubar the oil though.

    What is being missed here is not whether to water in the oil causes frothing, it is the water in the oil forming carbonic acids. Water + oil + carbon from combustion (ring by-pass) = acids. This is really nasty shit to circulate thru your crankcase. This is why it is important to heat the oil to boil off the water, not because of foam.
    #34
  15. Wallowa

    Wallowa Long timer

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    Yup carbonic acid is indeed nasty stuff that you do not want near any bearings...that is why a relatively cheap oil analysis could save big $$$$ in the future if you suspect contamination.

    "From The Clouds"? ...kool.
    #35
  16. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    It isn't combustion moisture, it is sweat from the disparity of temperatures in motor and air. Just like a glass of cold water on a hot day.

    Jim :brow
    #36
  17. JRP

    JRP Old guy

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    The sweat is on the OUTSIDE of the water glass.
    #37
  18. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    And the cold water is on the inside.

    Reverse it.

    Jim :brow
    #38
  19. tps

    tps Adventurer

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    When choosing a 'winter' oil, look for an oil with a higher Total Base Number (TBN). This is the ability of the oil to neutralize acids. Diesels generally have a 9-15 TBN, largely due to the higher sulphur content of the fuel, and the sulphuric acid byproduct of combustion. Auto and motorcycle specific oil are typically 5-8 TBN. Since I use my bike for commuting, and my one way commute is less than 10 miles, I run Rotella in the winter, especially in my '72 Airhead...
    #39
  20. def

    def Ginger th wonder dog

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    Excellent.

    High TBN oils also often permit longer OCIs.

    Rotella, Delo and Delvac are all excellent HDEOs. You don't need the synthetic versions to get the high TBN advantage. Also, if you find yourself a quart low, any truck stop carries them as well as Wal-mart.

    They are low cost oils used by diesel fleet owners who demand quality and value.
    #40