Old machine tools are cool

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by Bake, Nov 20, 2009.

  1. Bake

    Bake adventurer

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    Little gear drive Swedish milling machine I'm using. It's really just a mill drill actually, but it does ok. need to fix the quill spring, she'll just drop without the clamp tight. I wish this was an R-8 collet, it's an old style Morse though. 220 volt. On it's second owner, I'm not sure how old it is, but I think 1960's sometime. Retired Boeing engineer used it on his hobbies. I'm trying to find out more about him, long since passed away. It's been in Bill's garage for 20 years. I'm slowly cleaning it up while he's not looking. It has dozens of oil pots and grease zerks on it, and adjustable ways. It's got some play in the head bearings, to be sure. I haven't yet swept in the head and put the indicators on it to see what shape it's really in.

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    #1
  2. Desert Skies

    Desert Skies One brick shy...

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    This Atlas belonged to my father in law. I refurbished it an now use it quire a bit. Have another that is a doner machine.

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    #2
  3. dagwood

    dagwood Banned

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    cool.

    and that Atlas you can still get new repo parts for it.:thumb
    #3
  4. dagwood

    dagwood Banned

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    heres a whole shop full of old tool's. the mill side.
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    the WWII war effort Shaper.

    still runs the sames as new. now to learn how get the most outta it.
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    just an old Monarch from the 50's. I really don't like it. but it threads nice. just clunky and fickle.
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    i got more. but nothing obscure. just old. :lol3
    #4
  5. Cumminsman76

    Cumminsman76 befuddled

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    I'll have to get pics of my dads metal lathe. When it was made it had pedals on it.
    #5
  6. dagwood

    dagwood Banned

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    old jig mill. very fun.:thumb

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    old Bullard. not very fun.:lol3
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    just an old cincy'

    stinky bastard smells like ass no matter how much you flush out the sump.:bluduh
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    #6
  7. small_e_900

    small_e_900 Amanda carried it

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  8. dagwood

    dagwood Banned

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  9. Bake

    Bake adventurer

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    Thanks, small e, great find. I'll read the website.
    I know this little mill was just about like what a hardware store Jet bench model mill/drill is today. Once upon a time, I had an Enco 12 speed (change the fricken belts-ugh) mill/drill. I had just purchased the stand and power feed Y axis when divorce kibashed the whole deal. Machine tools and motorcycles. I wish I had every one I ever bought. Well, maybe not the A-2 350 Kawasaki, that evil bitch. :lol3

    Plumb dangerous for me to get an Enco catalog or tour the local Jet dealership. Bill has a new Jet lathe, and it's actully done quite well for him.

    Dag, the last pic, surfacing a Kirk block? Are you guys still using a drop hammer up your way? Air powered or rope and blocks? :lol3
    Try as they might, there are some sheet metal parts you're not making without smackin' one down.
    #9
  10. Bake

    Bake adventurer

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    It appears after checking this out, that Bill has the "heavier" version.
    This looks like it.

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    #10
  11. dagwood

    dagwood Banned

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    :lol3

    actually there is a set there. two pieces or half the set.H13.
    they then get matched, drilled, doweled, bored, and heat treat. then bushed for big freakin split pillow blocks. I thought i had pics somewhere of them finished but can't find them.
    just about everything we do is big an ugly. saw mills, logging, equipment, foundry's, etc. nothing high tech or actually complicated. just lots a 4140, H13, A3, etc.
    and Bronze.:bluduh
    #11
  12. dagwood

    dagwood Banned

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    we actually have a couple of Enco style lathes from the 80's. i think one is an 94' still made in japan.
    I have to say for all it's quirks it aint bad. I abuse the shit out of them as i get allot of the threading and oddball metric shit and the only other lathe that threads metric I need a ladder to see the tool.:lol3

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    #12
  13. knary

    knary sunshine and puppies

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  14. dagwood

    dagwood Banned

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    I'm around all weekend.(other than a few things to do today) tell Elias too. unless he went all Carnivore caveman with Shawn.:lol3
    #14
  15. Bake

    Bake adventurer

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    I've had a few run in with silicon-bronze pins I needed for various weld jigs. It's tough, you're not going to rush that.
    Regardless of what the Plant Manager says.
    I sometimes tell them, "We always have time to do it OVER, but never enough time to do it RIGHT."
    I only tell them that if I'm in a Union shop, however.:lol3

    Ever tried cutting Brake Die steel? I'm not sure what it's real name is, probably S-2 after HT or something, but it's like cutting a brick. Scratch, scratch, scratch, GALL, burn, smoke, scratch, scratch, scratch...

    I don't have a pic of it, but 20 years ago my friend bought a 2 head Optical tracer mill by Bridgeport, used. It had this cluster of spider eyes that were supposed to follow a 2d outline as a flat pattern. Never did get it to work right. It'd wander off and hit a dowel or something.
    I did have good luck running the setback stylus pen tracer mills, though. Making steel templates for the jig, and running those mills was my first Tooling job.
    #15
  16. Curvy

    Curvy Lost Planet Airman

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    Fire up the baby Alas today......................Turned down some screw heads.:evil
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  17. dagwood

    dagwood Banned

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    :lol3
    cast Iron. Gad. Ductile HT Iron. you'd think you were cutting Glass.:bluduh
    once cast has that heat glaze on it. you're fucked. get out the ceramic inserts. lots of them.

    better yet when some yahoo thinks. "hey! lets just "weld" DOM to this wasted cylinder gland...which BTW is ductile iron.:baldy "but we'll use stainless wire as a shield" :baldy
    I'll get pics monday. i just did one gland and have another to do monday.
    oh joy..:twitch

    never used a tracer. the jig mill used to have limit switches and a tracer for bolt patterns on engine blocks. the boss ripped that all out when he got it.
    we never or rarely do more than a couple of anything.
    #17
  18. dagwood

    dagwood Banned

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    looking at the link small E posted I got a chubby for a desktop/ jewelers lathe. A Hardinge would work...:lol3 but a little jewelers would be more practical.

    them little Atlas/ Craftsmans are pretty damn handy.
    #18
  19. dagwood

    dagwood Banned

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    PS Bake. :lol3

    I heard this along time ago
    "if you're Gonna Fuck it up Fuck it up Fast. Time is money."

    still holds true. cheaper to do it once slowly and right than have to go back and fix or redo it. material is cheaper than time..well...not in what I do. but for the most part.
    it still rings true.:lol3
    #19
  20. Hodag

    Hodag native

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    pig iron machines easy, nice chip clean out

    don't care much for stainless
    welding yes, machining no
    #20