OMFG klr 650 wobble help!!!!!!!!

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by tim007, Aug 25, 2011.

  1. EvilClown

    EvilClown Reality show stunt double Super Moderator

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    Someone has mentioned it already but try it without the big aquare boxes on the back. You may be surprised how much they contribute.:deal

    You can always put them back on to haul yer shxt but at least you'll have either ruled them out or know what is causing it.
    #21
  2. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod I want to do right, but not right now

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    Something to remember, which many don't realize is that adding preload to the spring doesn't make it stiffer. If you add enough preload that the ride becomes harsh chances are the shock is topping out on rebound. Add more rebound damping (that knob on the bottom of the shock) and see if that helps. If that doesn't help back out the preload a little bit, but I'd be surprised if you were out of your sag range with the stock suspension at full preload. How far does the rear of the bike sink down when you sit on the bike? I think the KLR should sag anywhere from 1 1/2 to 2 inches with rider. (sag rule of thumb with rider is 1/4 of total suspension travel)
    #22
  3. tim007

    tim007 Banned

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    Yeah im going to take the boxes off and go for a test ride after this little helper of mine gets up from his nap (9 month old asleap in my arms) and when I adjust the rear shock I am adjusting the prelode and tthe rebound. In equal incriments.. I don't know how mush it sags buut I know that when I take it off the side stand the bike squats lower but it looks normal .. ill go call my friend at edr or gp suspension and see what they say they know what there doing when it comes to that isit
    #23
  4. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    Sometimes it is the obvious. If it did not do this this until you changed the tires, it is probably the tires. Are they seated correctly? Are they out of round? Did you check balance?

    Have you checked your wheel bearings? Get the front off the ground and grab at 12 and 6 o'clock position and check for play. Put all the spacers back in the right place?

    I am not familiar with your tire choice, but knobbies do squirm around on pavement until they wear a little and get a set.
    #24
  5. tim007

    tim007 Banned

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    I supose I should mention that I do not change my on tires. :)
    #25
  6. AJay112

    AJay112 Back on the, "old" ADVRider...

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    Unless you have a pet monkey on the tank "helping you drive" it's the tire. Even if you do have a monkey it's still probably the tire...

    Wait... scratch that. It's ALWAYS the tire, well not ALWAYS but almost always. A fork / frame twist can cause a wobble but not as often as monkeys do.

    NOTE: Most frame and fork twists are cause by crashing the bike at speed.... due to a wobble caused by a bad tire and on rare occasion; monkeys.
    #26
  7. CA Stu

    CA Stu You could do worse Super Moderator

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    The KLR Death Wobble is really common.

    What fixed it for me was loosening up the forks and front axle, moving them around in the clamps a bit and making sure they were even, then re-torquing them.

    put bike on stand with front tire off the ground.
    Loosen one fork's upper and lower clamps, leave the other side tight.
    Rotate the top of the loose fork back and forth in the clamps to let it "settle" a bit (they will want to even themselves out if the front axle is tight, in other words if there is a difference in height in the clamps, it will move up or down to where there's no push or pull on the fork).
    Re-torque the loose leg and go for a test ride.

    That worked for me, dunno if it'll work for you. :dunno

    Make sure your front tire doesn't have a broken bead wire, too. Spin it and look for a bulge in the sidewall.
    That would be super obvious, but I've also had that happen to me when I had a shop mount a front tire for me. It was "free" :pissed
    #27
  8. SCouch

    SCouch Been here awhile

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    I have worn out D606's on mine, the only time it doesn't wobble is when the front tire is in the air. My fix is to put the throttle lock on and steer with one hand in the middle of the cross bar. Before I put the fork brace on and changed the fork oil, it would go into a tank slapper If I held the grips at speeds over 80. Now it just has a boring low speed wobble, something like the notorious Harley wobble that makes posers piss in their panties. I do admit, the first time it happens it will scare the shit out of you, but with a little practice its just part of the adventure.
    PS, if you are travelling at interstate speeds and something passes you that you want to speed up and check out again, thats when you will experience your first tank slapper.

    I'm not suggesting that you not fix it, but the one hand in the middle of the cross bar thing will work when it develops the wobble. Mine does still have a slight wobble, but I do intend to cure it.
    #28
  9. UncleDirt

    UncleDirt Uncivil to idiots.

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    This. The hand-guards are fine. The stock fender is fine. The first and most common cause is the rear shock preload. Adjust it upwards and then try it again. If this does not fix it totally, do the rest.
    #29
  10. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer

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    service the fork oil... I have done at least a couple dozen KLRs & NONE were even up to minimum unless the owner did the work. proper oil level makes as much difference as adding a brace, and changing fenders & hand guards make only a minimal difference by comparison. the original oil level was 170mm, that changes to 190mm somewhere along the line. what WORKS is 170mm of 10 wt (or ATF)... remove springs, collapse forks, fill to 170mm from the top. trim with 10-15 psi air on the forks (no it won't blow the seals). every owner I've set up like this has been very happy with the outcome. also do like CA Stu advised on the fork/axle. and the rear shock preload thing too
    #30
  11. woody's wheel works

    woody's wheel works Built to Last

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    one item that can provide your symptoms that hasn't been mentioned is the true of your rear wheel/tire...:huh

    an out of round rear wheel/tire will move left n right at lower speeds and at a certain speed where it becomes to difficult for the tire to track it will essentially set the rear end in motion and let the bike oscillate over the tire contact point ,transmiting the energy to the steering head and induce head shake /wobbling and ultimately tank-slappers:cry

    Rx,,get rear end up in air ,,,fire bike up ,,,pop in first gear and watch the rear wheel/tire do it's thing,,your eyes will tell ya right away if the wheel and/or tire are true or not....if one or the other or both are out of wack,,FAN ie either true wheel,,swap tire for a straight one or both if needed.

    :freaky
    woody

    PS FYI,,,overtightened steering head bearings will give you grief in the handling department,,,the bike will essentially the rule of thumb is tighten to just where the front end can flop left n right smoothly..ie no front back play at all but not so tight that the flopping cannot occur
    #31
  12. El Brad

    El Brad Leave it long on top

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    One of the guys that I ride with and myself have very similar KLRs, mine is a 03 his is a 02. Both bikes
    have the exact same mods done to front and rear suspension, both bikes have the same steering damper
    and we run the same tires.Both bikes forks are set at same height. Both bikes are very well maintained, now assuming that both bikes have proper air pressure in tires, correct rear wheel alignment and triple clamp bearing adjustment, the only difference between the two bikes is the front fender, my bike has a aftermarket Acerbis
    front fender and I have never had any wobble issues with mine, the other bike still has a stock front fender
    and has had the wobbble issue a couple of times. And we both use dyna beads for tire balancing.
    Iam not saying its the front fender thats causing the problem, just a comparison of two almost identical bikes
    where one has had the problem and one that has not.

    I run big plastic side cases like Pelicans and he runs soft bags. Wobble issues on his bike have been at
    hiway speeds with bags on.
    #32
  13. tim007

    tim007 Banned

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    Ok update .... bike has no wobble now at 40mph-78mph wich is a goood think as thas the range of speed I need but if I go to 80mph the wobble comes back but not as bad as before. And thas with all the bags still on the back...so im going to recap what I did using all the advise. Given from y'all

    Upped psi from 25ish to 33ish .... tightned/ added drag to the sterring bearings ...... set suspension to what some one sugested who lives down the road in oregon. Feels very well planted and not harsh yet not soft just right... and that's all ..

    thank you all for the assistance. Youu all are helping me make this dream bike stay a dream bike
    #33
  14. kpt4321

    kpt4321 Long timer

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    I'm a little late to the party here, but I just wanted to make a quick comment. A steering stabilizer is NOT the solution to a constant wobble. Steering stabilizers are there to help bring the steering back to neutral after something knocks it into a resonance situation. This can be a whole variety of things, from putting down a wheelie, to unloading the front on the racetrack, to striking objects off-road. In any case, it's NOT a steady state wobble.

    A steady state wobble is a bike/tire/suspension problem that needs to be addressed at the source.
    #34
  15. fatboy

    fatboy Been here awhile

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    Feeling planted and wobble are entirely different issues in my mind. What fixed your wobble ... head bearings, suspension or tire air pressure ... or did they all contribute to reducing wobble? I really don't see how your going to get that street bike planted feeling out of a 21" front wheel and dual sport tires. How you set up the bike is going to be a compromise between street and dirt riding. Just my 2 cents. -FB
    #35