On Mexican Time

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by tricepilot, Nov 25, 2007.

  1. Jerrykap

    Jerrykap Motorbike mishugana

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    Here's what Babel Fish said:
    "IT DOES NOT MISTREAT THE SIGNALS"
    I think they mean obey the signals?
    Gotta go, I look forward to more later.
    C-ya :norton
    #41
  2. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    #42
  3. beechum1

    beechum1 Dandole Gas al Burro

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    how about this one:

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    who can tell me what THAT means in MX...
    #43
  4. rous44

    rous44 Long timer

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    Don't disfigure the signs.

    In other words: don't shoot holes in them, and don't paint over them.
    Obeying them is optional.


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    #44
  5. rous44

    rous44 Long timer

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    Electricity is working.


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    #45
  6. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    :lol3
    #46
  7. beechum1

    beechum1 Dandole Gas al Burro

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    the response i was looking for was:

    "not much" hahahahaha
    #47
  8. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    :lol3

    In all seriousness, in the 4 trips over the last year, I personally have not been involved, nor witnessed, much in the way of erratic driving or bad behavior.

    I did make mention earlier in this thread of "Canada Dave II" who got rocked in Durango by a drunk driver. And I will tell that story, when this thread gets to the Creel part, because that's where I met him.

    On all of the autopistas, highways, cities, towns etc. over the past trips, not once have I seen someone blow a red light, stop sign, or, really, do much erratic driving on any of the highways.

    I have found drivers in Mexico to be pleasant, helpful, and pretty much a docile crowd.

    Its when I get back to the U.S. that I palpably feel the hostility, lane crushing, cutting off, and distracted driving that sends chills down your spine and makes entries in Face Plant.

    Also, what I have seen more than not, are Americans on their bikes suddenly feeling a freedom in Mexico, noting the relative lack of law enforcement, and who start screaming around the country at 90, 100 and more miles an hour. At times, I've found myself guilty of fast speeds when out in remote country and I've felt bad about it in the sense that I found myself to be the only real threat to others and myself. Notwithstanding the fact that the faster I've gone on the highway, the less I've seen of the country. I've done less and less of that each trip, and I plan to totally take it easy in the future.

    There are certain ways of the road there, such as the larger vehicle usually takes the right of way even if the smaller vehicle is "entitled" to it. But that's the way it is. In mountain passes, you may find trucks and cars in your lane as your round a curve. They post signs to this effect sometimes, sometimes not. But it is the way it is, and it isn't so much crazy driving as a way of driving that you get used to. You add it to your defensive driving tool box. Jammin got squeazed to the curb in such a scenerio.

    I'm not saying that crazy driving doesn't go on in Mexico.

    I am saying I haven't seen too much of it at all in the extensive miles I have put in there recently.

    I am saying I've done more myself than I have seen in others. In this case, not reckless driving, just blasting up to speed out in open stretches of countryside.

    I am thinking that there are probably people reading these threads who are thinking of going to Mexico and who think (like many impressions of a place someone has not been to) that it is indeed a land of "me first" drivers.

    And the bottom line I offer is that my own sense is that we are much more goofed up here in the 'Ole USA than they are south of the border.

    And by the way, with regards to speed, there are more and more Dodge Charger type police cars with radar being deployed. Times may change before too long....

    This is my opinion, your experience may vary.

    Bob :jose
    #48
  9. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    SI TOMA NO MANEJE

    Hints:
    :beer :slurp :dutch :jkam :photog :freaky
    #49
  10. Uncle Pollo

    Uncle Pollo Long timer

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    Holy Mother of All Trip Reports, Batman!

    Now I know why you took this long :lol3

    Now ... we forgot to mention that you never stopped at Magdalena de Quino :augie ... If you want me to, I have photos that you might want there, although you totally missed it. :deal
    #50
  11. rous44

    rous44 Long timer

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    Take Toma drinking with you, but not his ugly sister Maneje.
    #51
  12. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    :poser :jack
    #52
  13. bajarider

    bajarider Mexican with internet

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    In small towns, it means party time.....let´s hit the piñata.:D
    #53
  14. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Post away :type mi hermano! :thumb
    #54
  15. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    :wave Bajarider

    Are you riding something similar to this these days?:

    [​IMG]
    #55
  16. kennyanc

    kennyanc Long timer

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    SI TOMA NO MANEJE

    That's exactly why I like to stay near the Zocalo in the towns I visit. That is where all the bars and restaurants are and nothing tastes better than a few cervazas frias after a long day of riding.

    :freaky:dutch:slurp

    Este informe es excellente!! :clap Mas, Mas!!! Gracias Bob.
    #56
  17. Uncle Pollo

    Uncle Pollo Long timer

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    This is Magdalena de Quino; the town that Bob skipped. Magdalena de Quino is usually our first stop for a quick lunch after a very early morning and a border crossing. The significance of this stop is to start getting acclimated to the "Mexican Time"; to start getting used to that we are not in our usual Iron Butt mode but to start taking in the landscape, the people, and the places.



    Landscape ... this is what it looks like for most of the way from Nogales. Those hills that you see are actually the westmost side of the Sierra Tarahumara

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    Arriving to town

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    The town centre.

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    Wonderful Cast Iron Benches at the Plaza

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    Folk Art

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    Which actually depicts "Padre Quino"; the founder of the Missions along the Pacific Coast.

    Padre Quino is actually buried here

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    And this are his remains, which are object of reverence and worship by the faithful. I could go on and on on why would they have someone's remains visible like that; but take my word for it and settle for Pre-Hispanic influence as an answer.

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    A few mandatory church shots.

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    Inside

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    ... some more. Name this saint for a beer in .................... Batopilas :deal

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    Main Altar

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    I am sorry that Bob missed this particular town, since I hold it very dear to me. The cobblestones around downtown are probably a good 200 years old, and there is an atmosphere of unhurried busyness. It is an active little town, yet most people pace themselves as they have done for the last 400 years. Quite a refreshing feeling after stressing on the first miles across the border.

    Lunch? ... nah! .... I had one of this.

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    ... and watched some of this guys play around.

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    Regardless, I was not really worried about Bob since he had all my GPS points and a map of Mexico with him, the name, phonenumbers, and addresses of all the hotels for the duration of the trip. Secondly, he is very comfortable riding around Mexico since Bob is well on his way to become bilingual, and thirdly ... if he felt that he was truly lost he could have called me on my cellphone from anywhere in Mexico, or simply pull over a Pemex (state owned oil company, which operates all gas stations) and just wait for the rest.

    As a tour participant, he only needs to follow the route and he is not mandated to be either ahead nor behind the tour leader. In trade, he has to make sure that the support vehicle is always behind him at some point. Not that difficult to do, right Bob?

    :hide
    #57
  18. achesley

    achesley Old Motorcyclist

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    Man, what a different approach to a trip report from Mexico. Love it. I guess I'll be looking at some of these tour guide services in a few years when I retire and hopefully, can still ride my bikes. Guess I need to start studying Spanish ASAP.
    Thanks for the effort to bring this to us.
    #58
  19. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    ¡Por supuesto que sí! Mi hermano, I have always made sure I know where the support vehicle is! I would never let you down.

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    #59
  20. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Kenny is right again.

    If you drink, don't drive (ride) SI TOMA NO MANEJE

    However, when you are done riding, nothing could be finer than to toast the day's exploits in Mexico with the perfect post trip drink. :freaky

    My earliest spanish phrase collection included:
    "Quisiera conseguir una botella de vino tinto y unas copas, por favor" "I wish to get a bottle of red wine and some glasses, please."

    El Zocalo
    El Centro
    La Plaza de Armas

    All are terms for the "center of town" where the highest concentration of things to see and places to stay usually are.

    And, of course, the associated places to eat and drink, and people watch.

    If you are solo when you get to your destination town, you only need to ask a taxi driver about these terms, and you'll be led to the middle of town, or right to your hotel if you know where you are staying.

    Soon, you'll be toasting your day's adventures with your traveling friends.

    And many new friends that you will no doubt make that day, and every day in Mexico.

    Its time to focus on the sign in Kenny's avatar. Any guesses?:

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    #60