On Mexican Time

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by tricepilot, Nov 25, 2007.

  1. Uncle Pollo

    Uncle Pollo Long timer

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    Last gas stop before entering town. Notice that Bob is saving his sidestand by parking in the gravel.

    Look mom! No sidestand!

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    #81
  2. Uncle Pollo

    Uncle Pollo Long timer

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    Deep into colonial mexico ... narrow streets!

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    Plaza and former "haciendas"

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    Church

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    #82
  3. Uncle Pollo

    Uncle Pollo Long timer

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    That very afternoon, while everyone went for a walk, Bruce and I went to research for our dinner. I have been in Alamos before, but I have never eaten at the restaurant of "Hacienda de Los Santos" (is that the name?)

    So ... Bruce and I scouted the location.

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    Agave plants!!! (the ones that make tequila with)

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    The dining area

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    Bar decoration

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    Dry creek that divides the property

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    The level of detail is mindblowing, incredibly primorous.

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    The paintings ... incredible.

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    Dos Angelitos :hide

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    #83
  4. Uncle Pollo

    Uncle Pollo Long timer

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    Night falls over Alamos ... it's dinner time.

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    Alamos is one of the greatest little towns, however, there are some prices driven by the 50+ years of the American and Canadian demand that really leave me cold. Casa de Los Tesoros, the hotel we stayed, was fairly reasonable and still first class. Hacienda De Los Santos, well, is reasonable for the crowd that fly there on their own plane and have their own pilots too!

    Alamos once was one of the wealthiest mining centers in Mexico. It's location is remote and very little farming to be had around. In the summers it gets well over 100F, and winter the temperatures are mild in comparison. Also, it is one of the few cities that one can ride to across the canyon from Batopilas. Great destination if you are doing that.

    As the story goes, once day a couple decades ago, my boss Skip was taking a tour (never attempted before) from Ciudad Chihuahua to Alamos via Batopilas, then to the Sea of Cortez and then Baja.

    He remembers that it was already sundown when he arrived to Alamos, exhausted, glad that they have not gotten lost, and covered with a thick coat of white dust.

    He had reservations in Casa de Los Tesoros; but mind you that this is the 80's ... ok?

    So he arrives, removes googles and helmet, and knocks on the door. The lady who was in charge back then opened the door and she was presented with such characters. She must have been an incredible business woman since all she said was: "Senior Mascorro? ... Your rooms are ready!" :lol3
    #84
  5. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    I just woke up from a nap.......this was in my dream:

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    #85
  6. Hootowl

    Hootowl Long timer

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    #86
  7. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    #87
  8. kennyanc

    kennyanc Long timer

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    OK, I'll play along if nobody else wants to.

    Populated area ahead, (Congestion ahead)

    "Dim your lights for oncoming traffic", not sure what the custom is you speak of though. I thought it was just so you don't blind oncoming drivers.

    Great report Bob!!! Give us some more!!
    #88
  9. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Kenny,

    You were correct on POBLADO PROXIMO, but missed on this one. This one is important for safety reasons. It has nothing to do with night time driving with high beams!

    Hint #1: Look up the spanish verb ceder

    Hint #2: Its high noon, and you're on a highway following a truck, for example, and you pull out to pass. As you get into the left lane, there is a truck coming in the other direction, himself being passed by a car who is flashing his headlights. What is the car communicating by flashing his lights? Therein lies the meaning of the sign,,,,,,

    CEDA CAMBIO DE LUCES

    Another try?
    #89
  10. OldBMWMaster

    OldBMWMaster Banned

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    I began reading this RR with a Harley buddy. As soon as you mentioned that one of the bikes broke on the trip, I said "Harley POS". He bet me $20.00 it was the BMW final drive.

    (This is, I believe, the last known photograph of Canada Dave I's 1974 Harley flathead in working condition. Tomorrow, the motor would blow up underneath him on Mex 15)


    Thanks for the money. I will buy top shelf tequila for the girls.
    #90
  11. Uncle Pollo

    Uncle Pollo Long timer

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    Great!
    #91
  12. Jammin

    Jammin Living on a DR

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    Bob, excellent ride report! :clap I love the flowing approach to your report. Looks like you're on your way to becoming a Mexico Riding Ambassador :devildog

    Waiting for the rest... :ear
    #92
  13. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

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    I just wanted to say your report sucks. :deal

    Mainly because you barred me from participating, it's actually pretty good otherwise... :lol3


    Gustavo
    #93
  14. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    :beer

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    I bow to your ride report Jay, here's the link for everyone once again:

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=268571

    Ladies and Gentlemen, the Great Gustavo is in the house!
    :bow :bow :bow :bow :beer :beer :bow :bow :bow :bow

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    Some of the best reading anywhere on advrider!:

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=130257

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=198031

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=215855
    #94
  15. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

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    Oh, yes, this last post reminded me of something I forgot to mention in my reply:

    You are having way too much fun with Photoshop. Some really nice work :bow , even if un poco :loco in that last post... :lol3

    Now get back to work, there is still a lot of ground to cover. :type


    :freaky


    Gustavo
    #95
  16. FatChance

    FatChance Road Captain

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    Great ride report! :thumb

    I'm enjoying this a great deal. Thanks! :wave
    #96
  17. princess jamaica

    princess jamaica OLD DOG-NEW TRICKS

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    excellent story and pics.i MUST go someday.
    #97
  18. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    I was right behind him when it blew.

    Cananda Dave (I) was sitting on top of a time bomb, it turned out.

    We were rolling Mex 15, headed to El Fuerte. It was another, yet again, perfect day to be riding in Mexico. I was enjoying cruising along, lost in my own thoughts. I was on another day's ride when the IPOD was left in the bag, as I didn't want to hear anything but the hummmm of the motorcycle and those of other riders around me.

    Suddenly, brrrrrrrrrrrrrrummmmmmmmphlegggggghhhgghhhh

    I felt like I was behind one of the Thunderbirds or Blue Angels when flight lead says "SMOKE ON!"

    Tiny drops of oil hit my windshield and visor, and Dave pulled over so suddenly that I couldn't stop and had to swerve (safely) around him. We were two lanes in one direction, with no shoulder whatsover.

    Bruce was up ahead of me somewhere, and I knew others were behind Dave and I and would stop to help him. Alejo was not too far behind with the van and the trailer.

    I caught up with Bruce and made a slashing motion across my neck and pointed back to where we came from. He knew something had gone wrong.

    When he pulled over, I told him Dave's motor had blown. Alejo came screaming along, having seen Dave on the side of the road, but he too had to pass initially, catch up with us, and then turn around to go back to fetch him.

    Everybody collected and we made the decision to press on to El Fuerte since Dave was in good hands with a lifeline from Alejo and the van/trailer combo.

    Motorcycle #1 of 2 not to finish the trip was done with Mexico.

    Dave's bike is a 1974 flathead. That's a lotta years on a bike to take to Mexico, but Dave said he had gone over the bike pretty well and felt it was going to be fine down here.

    There is no good or bad bike to take to Mexico, just one that suits you best and one that has had reasonable maintenance done to it.

    Pretty much the things that go wrong with bikes in Mexico are:

    (1) Flats

    (2) Electrical (mainly dead batteries)

    (3) Everything else

    If you don't have Alejo and his trailer to get you out of Mexico, then you have to use your wits.

    What I would do if I was on my own and my motorcycle absolutely died, and I couldn't get parts to fix it in a timely manner, would be to get someone with a truck to take it to a town where I could leave it with someone, and bus back to San Antonio, get a truck of my own or a trailer, and go back into Mexico and retrieve it.

    In any event, it would stink to have your ride give it up on any trip, but you have to have some idea of what you could do if it happened to you.

    Dave ended up riding in the van with Alejo the rest of the trip, save for a day when Colorado Carl was kind enough to take a day off and let him ride his Honda.

    I would take a Harley on a long road trip in a heartbeat.

    In fact, I have one and I took it around Lake Superior in 2005. Note the Office Depot file crate strapped to the back with my camping gear. I remind myself of Putts:

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    I used to have some opinion on brands of bikes. Then I read Peter Egan's Leanings, and then Leanings II, and it changed the way I viewed all motorcycles. Now, I like all types of bikes, and I am more of the "its not what you ride but that you ride" type of person.

    That said, no matter what you ride to Mexico, I would really, really make sure you have done all you can possible do to get it ready for longs days in hot weather and also for altitude. If you take care of the rubber and the battery, and have everything else checked out, then you'll probably be fine.

    And have a plan on what you'd do if you broke down in the middle of nowhere.

    :pope
    #98
  19. kennyanc

    kennyanc Long timer

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    Excellent point Bob. The best bike to take to Mexico is the one you have. Prep it right; new tires, good battery, etc. and hit the road. Very seldom do the stars align to where everything is perfect. If you sit around and wait for that you may never go. Just get off your butt and go!! It will all work out.

    I have never really had a plan in case something broke. Just figured I would pay somebody with a truck to get it back to the border and then rent a u-haul or something to get it back to NC.

    On the other hand, it is after all just a KLR. :lol3 :lol3 Not the end of the world if it never comes home.

    Kenny
    #99
  20. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    :wave FC!

    Dude, what will it take to get your Honda 90 off your hands?!?!?! :ear

    I know you wouldn't/shouldn't sell it, but man, that was supposed to be my bike back in the day!


    :wave PJ!

    Don't wait too long to get to Mexico! I'd even ride your Ducati if I were you, if you haven't sold it yet!

    :jose