On Mexican Time

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by tricepilot, Nov 25, 2007.

  1. kennyanc

    kennyanc Long timer

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    Ride, Princess, Ride!!! Just go!!
  2. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Nah, I have a better plan.

    You would sit tight in whatever town you were in, and PM me, and I would come and fetch you and the KLR while you waited with a supply of cervazas and limes.

    :freaky

    I have an emergency stash of pesos on the bike for "contingency" logistics such as exactly you describe.

    People reading this thread and starting to think about what they would do should remember that the people of Mexico are incredibly helpful and creative. That, and any reasonable sum of money you offer to get help would probably be a godsend to them while at the same time getting yourself out of a jam.

    But hey, its adventure travel.

    "The adventure starts when things stop going according to plan"

    - Glen Heggstad
  3. kennyanc

    kennyanc Long timer

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    Woohoo!! Sounds like a plan to me. :freaky :rayof :beer
  4. SKINNY

    SKINNY Been here awhile

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    That was pretty much my plan, last January when the ignition module on my new Husky decided to take a dump in downtown Batopilas on a Saturday afternoon...I found a local on Sunday who took me and my wounded partner Teeds, back to Creel, where we hired another local to take us to Presidio...I'm still bummed about that...:2cry
  5. hgulledge

    hgulledge Adventurer-of-sorts

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    The first one to flash his lights expects to have the right-of-way. Especially important to know when meeting oncoming vehicles on really narrow bridges. :DDAMHIK
  6. Uncle Pollo

    Uncle Pollo Long timer

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    I still owe some retrieval of a bike for a fellow ADVrider that has his bike next to a creek somewhere in the sierras.

    Rescue has not yet been possible.

    Although you may have heard good rescue stories, some are not so good.
  7. Uncle Pollo

    Uncle Pollo Long timer

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    :ddog

    Where are my millions of pesos?
  8. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    :thumb Its all about the stories.........

    [​IMG]

    You know by now what you've won!
  9. RocknTroll

    RocknTroll Been here awhile

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    Been readin this during lunch the last couple days and all I can say is the story is GREAT lookin foward to hearing more bout the adventure yer on :clap
  10. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Leaving the state of Sonora and entering Sinaloa, we press on down to Mex 15 with Dave's bike elevated, and we roll twoards the wonderful town of El Fuerte.

    El Fuerte is probably best known as a stop on the Copper Canyon railway, although it is a picturesque town worth a stop in its own right.

    Dave's bike would be in this position until it left Mexico:

    [​IMG]

    We got to the hotel, which didn't look too promising from the outside. It was nicely located, just a block off of the plaza.

    [​IMG]

    We were pleasantly surprised when we got through the doors:

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Lots of hummingbirds all over the property:

    [​IMG]

    The owner, Francisco, told us the place had been in the family for a long time. His father was born in one of the rooms now rented as a guest room.

    [​IMG]

    The bar and the restaurant were in this building:

    [​IMG]

    The Plaza de Armas was again, very beautiful:

    [​IMG]

    The plaque in the park was dedicated during the presidency of Porfirio Diaz, who later was to clash with Pancho Villa.

    [​IMG]

    By wandering around and walking through doors, there are always interesting finds:

    [​IMG]

    The place was guarded by a single pistol carrying gentlemen. He didn't ask me what I was doing and I didn't ask him what he was guarding.

    This guy was keeping the street nice and tidy. I complimented him on his bike and he glady posed for a photo.

    He said nobody asked for his photo with his bike before.


    [​IMG]

    This is Benito, the caretaker at the hotel. Just after I took his picture, he asked me for some pesos to "tide him over" as he was heading out. No problem, Benito:

    [​IMG]


    Everywhere we went, we had a secure place for the bikes.

    This place was really secure, as all of the motorcycles were parked inside the compound behind a locked gate.

    [​IMG]

    Compare this photo:

    [​IMG]

    To this:

    [​IMG]

    That stuff is Solas Tape, which you can find on the internet. I bought an entire roll and use it for the kid's bikes and a lot of other uses.

    This night turned out to be an early go to the rack night for me. The rest of the gang went to dinner.

    I needed the rest.

    It was one of those evenings where a camera stroll through town to get the memorable pics was enjoyable, but relaxing at the hotel was what was on everybody's agenda. :freaky

    What was to come in Mazatlan over the weekend would be too incredible to be true, at least for me!
  11. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    :wave RnT!, glad you are enjoying the trip!:thumb

    Its time for another Mexican highway sign.

    CEDA CAMBIO DE LUCES was a challenge, but this next test should be a little easier.

    These signs are related. What do they mean?:

    PREPARE SU QUOTA

    and

    PARE EN CASETA

    :augie :ear

    As always, you know what you win!


  12. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

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    I'm impressed :bow, but despite the fact that this a Mexican custom, I think you owe Kenny (another?) dinner. The sign is not about that, rather about dimming your lights at night, like he said. :deal


    Gustavo
  13. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Ceder: To Yield
    Cambio: Change (flash)

    But after consulting my esteemed adviser at the Argentinian Consulate in San Antonio, I am advised that you, Gustavo, are correct. :bow

    That is why the roles in the photo are not reversed!:

    [​IMG]

    I am always willing to be here to learn more about Mexico:

    [​IMG]

    I am actually not in this photo when it was taken. I was in the boiler room being punished by Mr. Pricktard:whip


    :jose
  14. kennyanc

    kennyanc Long timer

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    :poser :poser :poser

    This report is great!!! Keep it up TP. You've got me hooked.

    K
  15. kennyanc

    kennyanc Long timer

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    I asked a Mexican friend of mine a while back about this sign and she just shrugged and said it means to dim your lights.... No mention of the MX custom about the first to flash...

    I hope not to get in the situation where I need to decide whether it is ok to continue a pass based on whether someone flashes their lights at me. MX is no place to take chances. I love riding there but you need to use a little common sense. On a bike it is usually no problem though. My only close calls passing other vihicles have been in the US.

    Carry on Bob!!
  16. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    These signs are related. What do they mean?:

    PREPARE SU QUOTA

    and

    PARE EN CASETA

    :augie
  17. princess jamaica

    princess jamaica OLD DOG-NEW TRICKS

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    in the mail.honest.
  18. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    I was asked in a message to comment here about my experience with gasoline in Mexico.

    [​IMG]

    Veteran Mexico riders should skip this, or chime in with an opinion if you'd like.

    PEMEX - Petroleos Mexicanos - is the single national brand of gasoline available everywhere in Mexico.

    The bottom line, and you can read this paragraph and then even skip the rest of this post, it that its great gas, cheap (on par with U.S. prices) and will work in any motorcycle without any issues.

    PEMEX stations are full service stations, meaning the pump attendant will pump your gas for you. But that's only if you want it that way.

    Most motorcyclists like filling their own tank, so just say so or motion for the handle saying a quick "por favor".

    [​IMG]

    You'll see two choices at the pump, verde (green) and roja (red - premium). I usually opt for the roja, but I've filled up and verde many times when it was the only option.

    [​IMG]

    Each time I pull into PEMEX, I have a 100 peso note ready - about ten bucks. On average, I'll spend in the 80 to 90 peso range, and give the other 10 to 20 pesos to the attendant as a tip. That's only one or two bucks.

    Only once have I thought I was almost been short changed at a PEMEX. But in thinking about it, I wasn't sure if it was me or the attendant. I've never met a dishonest person in Mexico, so it was probably me.

    In the back country, you can buy gas off the back of pickup trucks or from mom and pop garages. Of all the threads I've read, I have never heard of anyone getting bad gas. I'll let Kenny or Lone Rider or Gaspipe talk to this if the wish.

    PEMEX stations make great meeting points as well. If you split up, as I usually do, you can agree to meet at the "first PEMEX in town" type of thing. It works great

    The other habit most of us got into was to hydrate with gatoraid at each PEMEX. Not everybody carried water on their bike (although to do so is not only a good idea, it could save your bacon in certain situations). Long days in the saddle and the heat and the wind can combine to dehydrate a rider and at minimum make the day less pleasant than it could/should be.


    [​IMG]

    Don't worry about the gas at all, and don't worry if its red or green. Just tank up and fly!

    [​IMG]
  19. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Ooops I almost forgot.

    Speaking of PEMEX, it was at one when I had my bars turned while pushing the bike to the pump, and for some reason grabbed a handful of brake, and the combination of things started to lean the bike over to the point that I couldn't get it upright and it was taking everything I had to stop from laying it down.

    Peter saw what was happening and fortunately ran over to catch the bike before it hit the cement, but not before I popped a hamstring really, really good on my right leg.

    Well, not to worry, its Mexico.

    Alejo knew exactly what to get from the farmacia:

    [​IMG]

    Trust me. If Tylenol 3 works for you, these will be right up your alley! :choppa +100 :choppa

    This is the stuff to throw in your medical kit in case someone biffs or contracts some really serious pain. Just DON'T take any of this stuff while on your bike. Trust me.

    You'll want to write the name of this stuff down before you head for the border!

    And its over-the-counter, too

    WARNING. These claims have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Void where prohibited by law. Only sensible adults over 18 under the strict supervision of a physician should take Supradol while on a fantastic motorcycle trip to Mexico. Caution, may cause drug interaction. Use caution when combining with alcohol. Do not take more than 4 tablets in any 24 hour period. If you take more, you are having too much fun and should probably throttle back on the tequila a little bit.
  20. kennyanc

    kennyanc Long timer

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    I have bought gas all over MX: Baja and mainland and never had a problem. Bike always ran fine. My ST1300 called for premium but I often put in regular(verde) when that was all that was available and never had any problems.

    I have never been short changed or even had someone attempt it. And I always pay close attention to how much I owe and what I give the attendant. Most Mexicans are honest, hard-working people just trying to make a living. In my opinion you have as good a chance of getting gipped in the US as you do in MX.

    I always greet them in Spanish though so maybe it helps if they think I speak a little of the language.

    Kenny