On The Road Healthy Eating

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by dakardad, Feb 8, 2011.

  1. HardWorkingDog

    HardWorkingDog Harvey Mushman

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    Thanks, I'll see what I can find and give it a try...got an overnighter I'm planning.
    #61
  2. TheBreeze2010

    TheBreeze2010 Adventurer

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    Been reading the threads on this subject and it is "food for thought" (no
    pun intended). Have traveled alot 1 0r 2 up. What works for me is something light in the morning, coffee, oatmeal or a donut. I travel about 100 miles and stop and have a substantial breakfast. I love those Mom and Pop resturants that usually have a special that is cheap and filling. This meal will carry you over till dinner time. Be sure to drink water over
    the course of the day and have good snacks, fruit, nuts etc. A multivitamin is important too. Stay hydrated and enjoy the ride.
    #62
  3. Motojournalism

    Motojournalism motojournalism.com

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    Enjoying this thread guys, I'm taking notes...

    You might find some ideas at www.overlandgourmet.com

    They cater to the 4-wheel overland folks, but surely there's some things that would apply to us moto-travelers.

    Honestly, one of the best things about travelling outside North America (U.S. & Canada) is how nutritious, cheap and delicious the roadside food is.
    It's all rice, beans, fruit, veg' and meat. The fish is from close by, the chicken was running around the yard earlier that day :lol3
    You have to go out of your way to find greasy, unhealthy food.
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/antontrax/4220474580/" title="Way out West-1280109 by Motojournalism.com, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4058/4220474580_3b79d424f8_m.jpg" width="220" height="240" alt="Way out West-1280109"></a>

    Canada farmer breakfast (I do love this stuff too, I just know it ain't good for you!)
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/antontrax/3960737787/" title="Way out West-1230275 by Motojournalism.com, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3527/3960737787_af4cd24ab4_z.jpg" width="640" height="360" alt="Way out West-1230275"></a>

    USA Elvis breakfast
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/antontrax/4159319974/" title="Way out West-1260997 by Motojournalism.com, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2545/4159319974_8abe87f540_z.jpg" width="433" height="640" alt="Way out West-1260997"></a>

    Roadside fish lunch, Mexico
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/antontrax/4219716341/" title="Way out West-1280120 by Motojournalism.com, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2758/4219716341_35db335dc3_z.jpg" width="401" height="640" alt="Way out West-1280120"></a>

    $3 chicken dinner, Panama
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/antontrax/4492377728/" title="Way out West-1310938 by Motojournalism.com, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4032/4492377728_305839d955_z.jpg" width="640" height="412" alt="Way out West-1310938"></a>

    You know - if you can find them - green plantains travel well. They're those huge green bananas. "Unripe" green plantains taste somewhat like potatoes, but better. Just slice em, fry em, dash of salt and some salsa.
    [​IMG]
    #63
  4. PWRCRZR

    PWRCRZR Grumpy Old Bastard

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    Before the start of last season I set up to cook in camp. I purchased an MSR dragonfly stove, very loud, but very good for cooking. Boil to simmer and evrything in between. I also bought a set of pans, collapsible plate's and put together a small box of cooking stuff. I also have a polar bear cooler for keeping food cold.

    My personal preference when camping is to rise early, make coffee, then make breakfast. I like to make scrambled eggs with some ham,mushrooms,spinach. If I am hungry I will also add some canned hash(but that probably wont fit my new diet well)

    Egg's and hash from last spring..

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    For lunch I usually eat on the road, preferably in a restaurant. Usually a burger or sandwich..

    For dinner I like to stop at a local market or store and find something to cook up. Stirfry's work well, sausage, peppers, onions and shroom's is a favorite. I also carry a grill from time to time to be able to grill some chicken. I am really only limited by what I find for supplies along the way. Uncle Ben's ready rice is good stuff and an easy side dish.

    Steak stir fry
    [​IMG]

    Grilled chicken with some rice and veggies
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I actually prefer to cook in camp as I see it as part of the camping experience. When my wife travels with me she enjoys the fact hat I cook for her. It is also a great way to control our diet.
    #64
  5. intothenew

    intothenew Briar Patch Navigator

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    I would like to improve in the breakfast department, but I have some bad habits and prejudice.

    The bad habits revolve around time management. If it is past sun up before my kickstand is up, I feel like I am behind. So, I usually skimp on breakfast. Coffee and a bowl of grits is the usual. Some fruit if I had the chance to pick anything up the day before. I also carry a small softpack cooler.

    The prejudice concerns eggs. How do you carry and resupply? I sometimes carry egg solids bought from the local Amish. They travel well, but they lack in culinary delight. I can use them in a few recipes with some success, but trying to scramble or add them to something like grits has always ended with less than pleasing results.

    I think it has been mentioned before that some carry them poured into a fluid tight bottle. Is that the best method? A bottle big enough to hold a half dozen so that you can refill on the road? Is it common enough to be able to pick up a half dozen in most markets?

    I have one of the plastic cases supposedly suitable for whole egg transport. I just can't bring myself to trust it, it has been unused for over 20 years.
    #65
  6. rufusswan

    rufusswan Been here awhile

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    You can trust the plastic case // sort of// :D

    They are designed to prevent you from crushing the eggs while in a pack and are not really designed to keep eggs from breaking against the plastic while bouncing around on a moto bike.

    Some stores will not have eggs in a 6-pack, just find a store that does and by two of them to take home. Those store shelf paper packs are great if you are smart enough to pack them correctly. Use parts of an old rag to add some 'stuffing' inside the case to keep them from bouncing, and then insert into a quart ziplock. Voila, you can carry eggs. Hardboil the other 6 for quickie snacks on the first two days of the trip.
    #66
  7. HardWorkingDog

    HardWorkingDog Harvey Mushman

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    I don't think so. Eggs have a pretty highly evolved packaging system and will stay fresh in the shell for weeks as long as they stay relatively cool. Google usda & eggs. I would just take them in the cardboard carton, wrapped in a ziplock bag and some spare clothing.

    Course, I've never actually DONE this, but larryboy seems to be successful at this...
    #67
  8. BmoreBandit

    BmoreBandit nomo B

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    PWRCRZR, man I'd camp with you any day! :rofl
    That, looked good.
    Actually, I try to eat reasonably well and somewhat regualry, which means that I have to carry some stuff with me. Just trying to get some good lean protein.
    What really gets me is all those stories one hears about 'this great country cooking place, blah..blah', 90% of the times I frequented such establishment I ate beans and corn out of the can- in the middle of the damn corn country, but I guess WalMart/Cosco cans are cheaper.
    Usually what's implied is that it's going to be finger licking drenched in
    grease. I'll rather have an apple and a protein bar. Same goes for dual sports, I always read later how the food was 'delish!', and never do, but
    want to reply 'I pity you since you never had italian food apparently, what part of noodles with Ketchup was 'delish'?:lol3
    #68
  9. LasseNC

    LasseNC XSessive!

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    Over here you can get heat treated eggs in cartons like what milk comes in, albeit in smaller volumes. Surely that's the case in the US too?
    #69
  10. Motojournalism

    Motojournalism motojournalism.com

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    Yup, what he said:deal
    Grocers in many countries do not keep eggs in a refrigerator.

    Keeping them intact, off-road on a dual-sport is another matter. :ricky
    I've only lost a few using the above method (half-dozen eggs in cardboard package, double ziplock, packed in something soft.)

    I keep it simple, hard boiled with a bit of Maille Dijon
    #70
  11. intothenew

    intothenew Briar Patch Navigator

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    And I assume that to be true. Eggs, from the farm and unwashed, will keep for an extended time with very little attention. Unwashed is a key item in primitive storage. I buy a dozen every Monday morning from a local, brown and beautiful. I can't get that very often on the road, but in the time frame that we operate, I don't feel that is an issue.



    And that is where the overwhelming majority of my prejudice lies.
    #71
  12. HardWorkingDog

    HardWorkingDog Harvey Mushman

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    So what if a few don't make it? Some fresh eggs are better than none fresh eggs.
    #72
  13. intothenew

    intothenew Briar Patch Navigator

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    And, another of my bad habits. I'm a military planner. To the brig for the private that would break an egg. "We" carried it, "we" should eat it. Waste is something I cannot walk into willingly.

    No man, or egg, left behind.

    The truth is, I would consider the attrition ratio far too high. I consider the possibility of whisk eggs on my lounge wear too high. Prejudice?
    #73
  14. HardWorkingDog

    HardWorkingDog Harvey Mushman

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    :dunno

    Some might suggest stubbornness?

    I'll step away at this point. :wink:
    #74
  15. akadvntr

    akadvntr Frozen

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    #75
  16. Dan-O-Face

    Dan-O-Face Adventurer

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    80% of my breakfasts usually consists of a Whey protein shake, I bring along a large freezer bag (make sure its the heavy duty so they dont break), along with a Coffee press. The other 20% I pick up eggs the night before, along with some extra lean turkey breakfast sausage and whole wheat bread. The shake works great though, leaves you feeling full, gives you lots of energy throughout the morning, and best of all its quick so you can hit the road nice and early without having to do dishes.

    Lunch I usually stop at a Pita Pit, Extreme Pita, Subway type of deal, or hit up a grocery store pick up some meats, veggies and make my own.

    Dinner, I often pickup some chicken breasts with veggies and potatoes. Or cheaper alternative, Condensed Cream of Mushroom soup, add rice, buy some fresh Mushrooms toss it all in a pot and cook it for 25 mins.
    If I cook chicken breast, I will often cook 2-3 extra, and make a chicken stirfry (just buy a pack of mix frozen veggies the next day), quick lunch in like 15mins.

    Of course, if you like to have a drink from time to time, Vodka, water and a lemon or lime slice (48 calories)..."healthiest" drink choice you can do. If I feel like beer, I usually go with a Sleemans Clear (90 caloris) or Becks Light (64 calories).

    When I drink though, I'm usually not too concerned with caloric intake :p
    #76
  17. tripods

    tripods Adventurer

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    I rode my bicycle around Ireland, across Wales, to London. I packed a bunch of freeze-dried foods. They were lousy. I stayed in B&B's almost every night, with a few stays in hostels, and a few nights camping. In the mornings I would have the typical breakfast served in a B&B: some eggs, 'oatmeal', toast, tea, and they were always happy when I skipped the meat offered. Each morning I found a local bakery and loaded up with scones (Real ones, not the soft, sweet American type), a bread, and sometimes some cheese. This provided energy for pedaling. I would stop mid-day at a local pub for something good to eat for lunch. Dinner was usually in a restaurant unless I was camping or in a hostel, where I would cook locally bought fresh food.

    On motorcycle trips here in the US, I like a mix of nuts, seeds and dried fruit for snacking, along with good bread. Canned chick peas, some balsamic vinegar and olive oil are quick and easy to serve, and filling. Small tins of prepared food such as pasta and vegetables, or salmon and vegetables, etc are often found in our Ocean State Job lot store, and surprisingly, they have simple healthy ingredients, with no chemicals or preservatives. Some do have a high sodium content, so choose wisely or pee often. They also often have single serving meals in vacuum packed bags that require no refrigeration. Often they are Indian food, or rice based dishes. They are easy to heat in a small pan. Again, sodium content can be an issue. I find that too much salt makes it hard for me to sleep.

    I also carry peanut butter and bread. I also frequently buy fresh foods at local groceries, and cook if the situation requires it.

    I try to avoid greasy road food, because I hate having stomach problems while on the road.
    Part of travel is trying (Sometimes avoiding) local food.
    #77
  18. rosscoact

    rosscoact need constant supervision

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    On Friday night I pulled off the Sunset Track twenty metres and an hour later I was sitting in my camp chair, looking at the last remnants of light fading in the western sky, the campfire burning away and I ate a freezedried backwoods pantry "Roast lamb with mash".

    It was up there with some of the best meals I've ever had. Glorious.
    #78
  19. oldmanriver1951

    oldmanriver1951 Adventurer

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    Virginia Beach for now...Olympic Peninsula soon
    Whether hiking or biking, I have found Logan Bread to be one of the best values per weight and nutrition. Won't get into the recipe, you develop it yourself, lots of ideas on the net..but basically its a bread/bar/bscuit made from a variety off flours, nuts and grains and dried fruits. It's 'tasty' but not what you'd call great. It's also dry, packs well and lasts forever. Cup of tea in the morning and a piece of logan bread does me fine for hours, can nosh on it around lunch, and spend time around the stove making a hot meal for supper or enjoy a restuarant meal as a treat. One 2 in. square of logan bread has all the nutritional needs for a climber for most of the day. Idea is from a bunch of hippie climbers back in the 60's, climbing Mt. Logan in AK...Too high for an energy bar, but not high enough to be worth packing cooking equipment. You might have to make 3 or 4 variations till you find the mix that is right for your taste, but is sure is mighty handy. Freezes well also....always some in the freezer, ready for the trips.
    #79
  20. MTBRALPH

    MTBRALPH Adventurer

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    Location:
    Taos, New Mexico
    Breakfast:
    Homemade nut,grain and dried fruit mixture
    Fresh brewed coffee
    Dried figs or other fruit

    Lunch:
    Origional triscuit crackers (much less salt than the copies or flavored types)
    Tuna or salmon in olive oil. Small foil pack
    Dried fruit. If you don't dry your own be sure you get pure fruit. No added sugar or other shit
    Water

    Dinner:
    Sometimes I eat a mountain house or other brand back meal
    Sometimes cheese and crackers or bread
    Sometimes homemade venison jerky. If weather not too hot
    If at all possible a few pints of a good IPA

    These are some of my favorites. I don't do fast food. If in Northern New Mexico will ride a long way for good green or red chile

    Ralph
    #80