One more for the cheap seats....Scram-ster!

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by Ginger Beard, Dec 4, 2012.

  1. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yeah man. That's why I'm readin' this thread... to pick up tips and tricks that'll help me when and if I ever get around to building the "Scramster" idea I've had rattling around in my noggin for the last few months. Glad you didn't mind my small "contribution" as "payment" for the things I take away from your ideas. I sorta hate to "step on" someone else's build thread with my own tinkerin' but I figure a lot of people that read threads of this type are kinda like me and pick up little ideas that can be useful in their own projects.

    Being a cheap-ass with limited funds, I try to find economical solutions to help me afford my projects. Just wanted to show people that you don't have to have a lot of dough tied up in equipment to get good results. And with paying for powder coating it's usually much more economical to carry all your parts in at once as a "batch". But, I know for me, it doesn't work out that way. So, being able to do it at home, piece by piece as they're built, allows me to afford a better finish on all the parts as needed. Although the pics I posted pretty much suck (taken with my iPhone) and really don't show it, the finish quality is really quite nice, and the ease of the process can make the HF powder coat rig a real bargain for projects of this sort. Same with the little spot blaster for helping the coating adhere well to small parts.

    And the bike lift is much more stable than the more typical under-the-bike-lifts, lifts the bike up to three feet in the air for good access, and supports the bike fully from the frame so you can remove the front and rear suspension. I looked at a lot of lifts before settling on this one. One of the most common complaints on most of the others is that on some of them the hydraulic rams go out and can't be replaced, rendering the lift just so much scrap iron. When I looked at one of these I could see that when and if the ram does crap out, due to the way this one is designed, it'll be pretty easy to pick up a cheap scissor jack from the nearest junk yard, and with a little simple fabrication, use it to replace the ram. That'll provide nice controllable up and down, and can be ran off of a variable speed drill motor for ease of operation if you want. And will pretty much last forever without a problem. ALMOST makes me want the ram to crap out, just so I can make it "better". :D But, in the meantime it's working great just as it came. :thumb

    Looking forward to your next installment...
    #81
  2. sanjoh

    sanjoh Purveyor of Light

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    Are you riding this to the Polar Bear?
    #82
  3. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard I have no soul

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    Right now that's the plan. Hopefully I am able to get it all together and tested prior to the shindig. If not I will ride up on the KLX. Are you headed to the Polar Bear ?
    #83
  4. boatpuller

    boatpuller Been here awhile

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    +2 on how great and useful the Harbor Freight forklift style motorcycle lift is. I have access to both a industrial motorcycle lift table like is used in the dealerships shops, and the HF lift Randy mentioned. The HF lift is used much much much more than the lift table. As long as you have a frame under your motorcycle, I can't see any reason to use the lift table instead. The HF lift is that useful. I had a Road King that we rebuilt on my HF lift all winter long, and it held it great. I was nervous about it supporting 900+/- pounds at first, but soon learned to trust it, and eventually even get under the motorcycle when needed to service the undercarriage, like changing tires; that's not something easy to do on a lift table.
    #84
  5. sanjoh

    sanjoh Purveyor of Light

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    No need to test it:D Just ride it.

    Planning on the Polar Bear, see ya there.
    #85
  6. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard I have no soul

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    Cool, see you there. :freaky
    #86
  7. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard I have no soul

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    Teaser...


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    #87
  8. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard I have no soul

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    Two sneaky animals that really are no help on this project...Okay, they do provide me with comic relief at times. I have built a lot of bicycle wheels so I figured I would give building this wheel a go. I had already scored a late model Dyna hub from Ebay but I needed a hoop and spokes to go with it. I ordered an 18x2.5 Excel from Woody's Wheel Works as well as their oversize spokes and nipples. Zach was awesome and got my order processed quick. Ordered Monday afternoon and had it Friday morning. Thanks! :clap


    I see you ...BOTH of you!!

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    Spoke number one.... One thing that was odd for me is that the spokes cross but don't weave like a bicycle wheel. I already knew this since I have been truing my own MC wheels since I was a kid but it was still counter intuitive when building the wheel.
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    All the lower spokes in place. I thought that it looked kind of neat like this and contemplated just leaving it this way for arts sake. Wucha think? :ear

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    Okaaaay..Moving right along....

    Time to set the rim in place and start putting on the nipples...Hehe, NIPPLES!! :lol3 I'm freakin' 12.....
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    Much like the hokey pokey you will have left and right legs in... Time to go the other way. (Don't tell The Duck Dynasty guy that we are going both ways in this thread...)

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    If you have a bit of "fluff" on you, this part may be a bit tedious. Under and over...
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    The other side is rinse and repeat so I won't bore you with a rerun.



    Last nipple and I have a loose lace. WOOHOO! I also have a TenFidy which should make the rest of this go by more "smoothly". :wink:

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    Now to put it into my "custom" truing stand (patent pending) and get this thing useable!!

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    Hey look, a dirt wheel for an HD !! :D

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    Just waiting on my rim locks to show up so that I can get the wheel mounted. :freaky
    #88
  9. woody's wheel works

    woody's wheel works Built to Last

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    LOOKING good,,,,FYI ya could be riding by now if you'da asked Zach for the proper HEAVY DUTY ones we have in stock:wink:
    Have fun
    later
    woody
    #89
  10. Brian Keith

    Brian Keith Been here awhile

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    That is going to look killer. Of all the build threads I'm following this is my favorite.
    #90
  11. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard I have no soul

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    I needed to set the bike up with a tensioner for the belt. As luck would have it the stock exhaust mount is in the right place and it's damn strong. I picked up a Buell pulley off of ebay on the cheap, I later found out why...The bearings wear bone dry!! I pulled the seals, cleaned them and repacked them. Good as new. :clap

    The diameter of the bolt hole for pulley is slightly less than that of the exhaust mount hole so I made a little brass sleeve to take up the extra space.

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    A quick fit just to be sure it's all going to work...

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    Decided that I want a little extra support "just in case". :D

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    All welded up and mounted. Need to cut down the bolt and paint it so that she is show ready!! :lol3

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    #91
  12. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard I have no soul

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    Since I had previously knocked the bearing out of my new wheel I need to get them out of the stocker in order to refit them into my off road worthy wheel.


    The bearings in the stock wheel were a little crusty but felt good. I decided to pull them apart anyway just to be sure.

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    Anyone ever wonder why the older HD wheel bearings seemed to last longer than the new ones? Double freaking seals on each side of the bearing!! :eek1

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    The grease was still in tact and there was no dirt or grime inside. I cleaned them up a bit just to be sure that my removal of the seals didn't add something undesirable then I re-greased them and put the seals back in.

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    Since my bearing press didn't fit I reverted to my redneck ways and pressed them in "manually". :huh

    A little tap here and a little tap there...just to get things started.

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    Then out comes the flat board in order to make sure the bearing is going in straight .

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    Then a switch to big socket in order to sink them in where they should be. Just a note, if you plan on doing it the way I did be patient and DO NOT hit the bearing in the center!!! Be sure to only hit it on the body.

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    I also needed a rim strip and since I don't like the rubber ones I picked up the Armor Rim Tape from Motion Pro...

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    Here's the new wheel with a Kenda k270 4.5x18 installed.

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    #92
  13. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Or, just use a big socket, some all-thread, couple of big washer (plate with hole in it, etc), and nuts to make a bearing press...
    #93
  14. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard I have no soul

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    Yeah that was my plan as well but I quickly discovered that I didn't have any threaded rod or bolts long enough to fit through the hub. Figured I would put the warning out there in case someone decided to ham fist their bearings by beating them laterally right on the race...They don't like that. :lol3
    #94
  15. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard I have no soul

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    Thanks man!! :freaky
    #95
  16. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard I have no soul

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    So one of the things that needed to be addressed is the fork...I know that the 1983 xl600 was no featherweight but compared to a Sporty? It's a fringin carbon road bike in a sea of gas pipe Schwinns. It was recommended to me that before I go cutting springs, ordering new ones, etc that I add a preload spacer to the fork. 3in ought to do it..

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    Cut and installed the fork is notably stiffer. Let me just tell you that hand compressing the spring to reinstall the topcap was the opposite of fun. :lol3...We shall see if it works out. :huh
    #96
  17. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard I have no soul

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    I also needed to mount the fender to the fork. I wanted a low traditional scrambler fender. The XL forks do not have provisions for mounting a low fender. Time to improvise!!

    First the chrome HD fender support MUST go! I needed to drill out the factory rivets and tap them out.

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    I found some U bolts that were just about the right diameter.. Not perfect but the XL forks have little nubs where "something" may have been cast into another Showa fork model that uses the same sliders and strangely those little bumps are right where a fender would go. :D

    I made some arched supports to weld up to the u bolts.

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    Front
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    Rear
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    And a quick test fit to make sure that they will fit the way that I want them to.

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    And welded up to the brackets.

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    The u bolts were a bit long so they needed a trim..

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    And a quick cleanup of the threads..

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    Everything worked out swimmingly so it's off to the paint booth.

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    Add some stainless hardware to hold it all together and she's ready to mount.

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    Aaaannnnd....Here's mud in yer' ...Oh wait, make that no mud in yer' eye!! :D

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    The great thing about having it setup like this is that I can raise the fender if need be.
    #97
  18. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    How much static sag are you gettin with that much preload?

    One thing that I'm sure you've already considered is getting better damping control from the damper rod forks. I, among others, have found the Ricor Intiminators to really improve the Sportster's stock fork action. I know that in my case the improvement in damping actually allowed me to get away with the softer stock springs. Another member recently reported the same thing on his KLR over in rodteague's MPS thread. Not sure if they make anything specifically for the older XL600 forks, but since they are 39mm OD the ID may be the same as, or close enough to, the stock Sportster's forks to allow the Ricors for the Sportster to fit. Just thought I'd throw that out there just in case you hadn't already looked into them....

    And I know what you mean about trying to compress a lot of preload by hand! Geesh! When I was doing the mods to my Sporty last year I thought I'd NEVER get the damn caps back on! And that was just with the factory springs. Seems that on my bike, for some reason, Harley's suspension gurus decided excessive preload was the ticket. Once I had everything back together again I discovered that I had NO sag at all. After a lot of figurin and cypherin, and no small amount of experimentin, I ended up cutting 2 inches off the stock springs to get my sag set where I wanted it. I figured I'd need new springs anyway, so what the hell. But once I had everything done and started doing my road testing I actually found them to work pretty damn well set up that way. Full on panic braking over bumpy pavement still hasn't managed to bottom the forks and yet under everyday riding conditions I'm using what I feel is an appropriate amount of total travel. Nice and supple, and yet firm and controlled. Pretty happy with it now. :thumb

    Of course, my bike is strictly a street bike, and I know your application will be different. Apples to peaches and all that... so YMMV...
    #98
  19. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Awesome fender mount idea! :thumb
    #99
  20. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard I have no soul

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    Getting about an inch of static sag on the bike right now. According to people that know more than me ( not hard to do :) ) the xl fork was undersprung yet over damped. Supposedly the additional preload should be good for general riding....Sadly it won't work for big gap jumps or a 70ft table top. :lol3 Worse case scenario I will cut the springs down a bit and lessen th travel some which should stiffen things up a bit.



    On my street sporty I went with the Works performance kit... Rear shocks and new fork cartridges. The setup has worked exactly as I needed. Can't say enough great things about the guys at Works, especially Sandy who has listened to and responded to all of my dumb questions. :D