Opinions please

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by BOETJE, Apr 7, 2006.

  1. BOETJE

    BOETJE Been here awhile

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    .
    #1
  2. Photog

    Photog Charismatic Megafauna Administrator

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    Yup--got two scoots in the stable in addition to an 1150GS, 500GS, and CB700SC.

    The two scoots are a Kymco Super 9, which is a liquid-cooled 50cc bike that's a poor-man's Aprilia or Derbi racer...and a Stella (LML-built Vespa PX150) with a 177 kit in it.

    My primary purpose for scootering was saving gas; another issue is that with some hip problems I've got, just being able to slide through the frame to get on was nice for running errands where I'm on/off the bike every few minutes; third was that they're just plain fun for slicing through traffic or enjoying a relaxed ride in the country.

    My commute is 7 miles each way, suburban and city. The 50 I have does great. The Stella eats traffic alive.

    Underseat storage on some scoots really rocks and makes a huge difference--just open up the seat and drop in your lid, or 3 bags of groceries. The grocery hook that's usually on the leg shield rocks, too--you can add another 2-3 bags there, and balance a pack of sodas on the floorboards. :D They really are errand-workhorses.

    As for weather protection, I can't speak for the larger scoots with windshields like the Burger, but on both the Stella and the Super 9 I've got good wind/rain protection up to mid-torso, especially on the Stella. However, I still need rain gear (at least a jacket) and I wear boots for protection, but I've gotten zero splash on either so it's not like I need stuff that's rated for a downpour. As with the motorcycle, eventually the tops of your thighs get wet but I don't get the drowned rat effect on my lower legs like I do on the GS. I suppose if I had the big windshield like on the Burger it would be more like an RT or Goldwing and you'd have even more protection....someone else can probably speak to how much raingear they need.
    #2
  3. Ken OBSC

    Ken OBSC -6.12, -7.64

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    What country do you live in? I don't think the Burgman 250 is available in the U.S.

    You might want to look at a Burgman 400 or 650. These bikes are highway capable, have enormous storage under the seats (two full-face helmets) and great handling.

    Either one will out-accelerate most cages and are very nimble in traffic.
    #3
  4. Drumwoulf

    Drumwoulf n00b

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    Bought a lightly used, almost new, 2004 Honda Reflex 250cc scooter back in Dec'05. Since then I've hardly been riding my 1991 Honda Nighthawk 750cc MC at all...

    The extra weight and clumsier manuverability of the heavier MC does not (for me) in any way justify that bike's ability to just go zoom-zoom faster!

    The Reflex can do 75MPH easily (fast enought for me), gets around 70 MPG's, and is about 1,000 times more comfortable and manuverable than the 750 Nighthawk.... It's got a full fairing, auto tranny, plenty of stretch-out room for my legs, and enough under-seat storage for my helmet plus. And the twin super bright headlights mean that night riding (which I do a lot of) is no longer an eye-strain! (Plus the 'Flex' is also one helluva lot easier to back pedal into a broken-U reverse turn on the long and narrow gravel driveway of my garage!)

    So the 750 is almost (but not quite yet) ready to be put up for sale. After 26 years of riding motorcycles ranging in size from 400 to 1100cc's, it's really like a change in an era for me... But I am really finding the lighter, easier, quick and flickable big scooter more fun than the heavier 750cc. It's put the joy of riding back into my life again......
    Suggestion: If you're a bit jaded with riding, don't go bigger. Hell no!Go smaller!!
    drummer
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    #4
  5. Photog

    Photog Charismatic Megafauna Administrator

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    Have you given the Belladonna a try? It might be more to your liking since it's got a more traditional appeal as a classic 4-speed scooter.

    http://www.retroscooter.co.nz/

    It has odd ergonomics but they make sense once you've been on it, and it's rugged...and parts availability is great (and cheap). Over here in the US it's sold as the Stella.

    You'll lose the storage under the seat but it has a pretty large glove box, and racks are easy to get.
    #5
  6. S/W

    S/W Been here awhile

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    I have had all sorts of bikes and now ride a Honda Silverwing. I don't need anyother bikes because the SW does it all, city, highway, or touring.
    #6
  7. rider33

    rider33 Long timer

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    scooters can be great fun and the weather protection, gas milage,
    and storage capasity are part of that. It use to be that they were
    fairly underpowered but with models offered in excess of 650cc that's
    less of an issue now. If your coming off a bike tho, the one thing that
    may really bother you (did me) is the tinny wheels. 10" wheels have
    significantly less gyroscopic stability than the more typical 16-18" wheels
    found on bikes. The result is they feel more twitchy at speed and less
    willing to forgive surface irregularites. The solution to that if it bothers you might be the newer larger wheeled scooter such as the BV 500:

    http://www.rockridgetwowheels.com/bv500.html

    Personally tho, for around the city I use a KLR (sits way up high for visablity, weighs only 400# w/6 gallons of fuel, and if need be can
    jump Cooper Mini's in a single bound). Then when I REALLY want to go fly weight, I pull out the '64 Solex I restored this past winter. 'Nothing like
    riding a bike that weighs a lot less than you for a giggle. I call it my
    "Wee Glide".
    #7
  8. S/W

    S/W Been here awhile

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    Of course the thing that will spoil you about scooters is the auto transmission. It makes city driving much more fun. Although some people think shifting is "cool", after 40 years of driving, not shifting is a pleasure
    S/W.
    #8
  9. JohnTM

    JohnTM I suck toes

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    Something that may help you with the feet AND the rough ride. For me, they are both due to having my feet in an unnatural position for riding - right close together and in front of me. Two things to try: hook your heels on the outside edge or the footwell fairing. This places your feet further apart and you feel like you can use your feet a bit more for stability.

    My real favorite is to put my feet on the passenger pegs. You can really use your legs then, and everything feels like a big bike then. It should be useful as a tool to ease the transition and help you get used to the different riding position.
    #9
  10. donsolo

    donsolo MasterOfLosingMaps

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    you're telling me that isn't automatic reaction?

    man, I love my riva but when I go to turn the little bastard It feels like a ton of work because of how inside the scoot I am so I do all of those things...

    I really want to put highway bars on das uberskoot.

    that or buy that nighthawk:evil
    #10