Oregon 300 vs. Montana 650

Discussion in 'GPS 101 - Which GPS For Me' started by Critt, May 13, 2014.

  1. Critt

    Critt Rambling on

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2010
    Oddometer:
    481
    Location:
    Manitoba
    Hello all. I have a line on two used GPSes: Oregon 300 and Montana 650.

    The Montana is a lot more money, but comes with some mounts and extra maps. I really have no need for the camera on the GPS. The Oregon is probably capable of fulfilling my needs, but maybe is getting a little older. Apparently the screen is difficult to see.

    Can somebody help explain to me (or help me justify) why I should spend 4 times the money on a Montana over an Oregon.

    Montana ~ $400
    Oregon ~$100

    My uses are going to be mostly on-road motorcycling, with some back-road and off-road interspersed. Also, it would be nice to be able to use the unit in my car when I am not riding. (Trying to save money on the cell phone plan by reducing data usage).

    Thanks in advance. Trying to make a decision soon, so your help is appreciated.
    #1
  2. Emmbeedee

    Emmbeedee Procrastinators

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    10,651
    Location:
    Near Ottawa, ON, Canada
    If you have the $400, the Montana is a far better GPS than the Oregon. The power connection alone is one huge advantage the Montana has over the mini USB the Oregon uses.
    #2
  3. Critt

    Critt Rambling on

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2010
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    Manitoba
    True, it will be convenient to wire it right to the bike (not have to worry about non-waterproof connection and NiMH batteries).
    #3
  4. Critt

    Critt Rambling on

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2010
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    Manitoba
    Went with the Montana. The wallet sure felt the hit though.
    #4
  5. Emmbeedee

    Emmbeedee Procrastinators

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    You'll forget that fast enough. If you'd bought the Oregon, you would have regretted it far longer.


    Sent using strings and tin cans and Tapatalk.
    #5
  6. IdahoRenegade

    IdahoRenegade Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,689
    Location:
    Sagle, Idaho
    I have an Oregon and have used it pretty extensively. If you create a track (or multipoint route) offline, it's adequate to use for following it. Or if you just want to route to an address, it will do it. I found it useless for "in the field" route planning or updates. The screen is too small and the resolution isn't there. You're zooming and panning all over trying to see actual roads/trails and put a route together. I also had issues keeping the charger plugged in-took some redneck engineering with velcro and shoelaces to keep it charging. Montana looks to have a much more useful sized screen and a better charger plug, though I personally have never used one.

    One hint, don't get one with "built in" maps, buy the CD/DVD. You'll want to load them on both the computer and the GPS device. If you get the one with the "built in" map, you can't upload it to your computer, you'll have to spend another ~$100 for one. If you have the disc, you can load it on your device and computer-and I believe multiple devices. Don't do what I did and lose the damn disc though.
    #6
  7. DennisK_ID

    DennisK_ID Old and In the Way

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Oddometer:
    59
    Location:
    Idaho
    I have the Montana and love it. Don't have the audio hooked up but can almost always see the screen. it got this small town boy through rush hour traffic in Flagstaff.

    If the unit isn't connecting well with the pins on the mount, it won't work. It is odd. It isn't that it just won't charge, it won't recognize satellites or work at all. First I encountered that was after lunch. I'm pretty sure someone tried to steal the unit. Jerking it around in the locked RAM mount must have gotten it to a bad connection condition. I noticed it didn't recognize when the power was switched on (I have it wired to switched power). I had to turn the unit on by hand then it would recognize that it had power supplied to it. A few miles down the road it completely quit working. Couldn't find a satellite. Removing the unit and remounting fixed the problem but freaked me out a little. I screw in the lock on the RAM mount while riding but unscrew it and take it along if I'm away from the bike more than 5 minutes.
    #7