Our Life Behind Bars – Father & Son Doing Time in The Northern Frontier

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by GrizzLee, Jun 23, 2013.

  1. kildala2000

    kildala2000 The GS Store.

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
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    2,074
    Location:
    Northern BC Canada
    PM sent your way..
    Rick
    #81
  2. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2010
    Oddometer:
    679
    Location:
    Pacific NorthWest
    Thxs... tire installed... on my way.
    #82
  3. Bark

    Bark Panic Dancer

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    66
    Location:
    Kenai Peninsula Alaska
    Glad you are back on the road.

    Don't believe everything you read:D.

    You just drove the road at the wrong time to see many Caribou.
    Even PBS had to finally admit that there was no impact to the Caribou herds in fact there are more now than before the pipeline.
    This is from their website:
    The Impact on Caribou
    One particular concern was to protect Alaskan wildlife. Conservationists had feared the worst for caribou herds. They believed the pipeline would disrupt the animals' migration routes. When the engineers designed the pipe, they added 554 elevated sections (ten feet high) so the animals could cross under. The engineers also buried the pipe in 23 locations so the caribou could cross over it. Again, reports of how the caribou fared are different. Oil industry experts say caribou populations have doubled, while some wildlife biologists say this could be due to long term factors like climate change.

    So there are actually more caribou now than when the pipeline started but some groups want to convince you otherwise.

    LoL, sorry, just realized I made this post kind of long and got away from the important thing---your current trip.
    #83
  4. Yukon Johann

    Yukon Johann Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    35
    Leaving Dawson and heading towards home Yukon Johann has an unexpected accident.

    Yukon Johann's account:
    "We were one the flip side and returning home when something bad happened. I crashed the bike just 85 miles South of Dawson City, Yukon on the Klondike Hwy. We were going about 60 miles an hour, we were coming up on a corner, just before it my steering started wobbling slightly, it didn’t seem like much at first, it started to correct itself. I couldn’t have been more wrong though, I must have hit something in the road that made the wobble more violent. The rear wheel swung out to the right and got caught on the soft, gravel shoulder which had quite the steep drop to it. The bike got sucked into the gravel and now both of my wheels were in the dirt with one going all over the place. I didn’t want go down the steep slope (more like a cliff with trees) to my right so I turned the bike over to the left and slid the bike all the way across the road. I remember looking back toward where I came from when the bike spun around and seeing all of the things flying off the bike, the mirror snapping, the right turn signal light breaking off and pieces of my boot being shredded to pieces and being thrown all over the road. The bike spun around a little more, facing the ditch on the side of the road I was sliding into, I remember seeing the ditch. The next thing I saw was the bike flying right over my head, barely missing me. I stood up almost immediately and thought "WOW! i cant believe this just happened." Immediately after I got up someone pulled over to help us, he offered to get all of my gear and put it in his truck and take me to the nurses office. We went to the local nurses office in Dawson City, she told me I was one of the luckiest people to ever come out of a motorcycle crash at that speed and come out walking with only scratches, burns, and bruises. Despite how fast I was going, and what happened, the bike is in really good shape and looks like it can be repaired.

    That same night, we unpacked everything and looked all of the things my dad would need and set that all aside, and the things he didn't need we packed into my panniers. The following morning we took all the panniers over the airport and got them checked into the flight. we said our good-bye's and departed. I could tell my dad was very sad about what happened, so was I, but i was just really glad that I came out okay and i'm able to tell about what happened."

    Here are a few pics of the incident...

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    both of my boots were ripped to shreds

    [​IMG]
    the helmet really did save me

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    im so glad i had the lower pad on my jacket

    [​IMG]
    The riding pants did their job as well.


    And now for the pics of the bike :cry

    [​IMG]
    It was quite the sad sight

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    The bike's unrideable

    [​IMG]
    Handle bars bent, and pannier totaled, the wind shield took some damage too.
    #84
  5. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    545
    Location:
    Denver
    Um . . . . HOLY CRAP! I'm very glad you are okay. Your ATTGATT approach to riding saved you.

    I can't imagine the severe sphincter contraction you must have experienced as the GS flew over your head!

    Quick thinking to lay it down low side rather than catapult yourself off the tree-lined cliff!
    #85
  6. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2010
    Oddometer:
    679
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    Pacific NorthWest
    Can a parent be too cautious? Am I bad father? Did I push to hard? Was I too anxious? Selfish? These are the questions I asked myself over and over again as I rode home, solo... reflecting on the ride so far and the previous trips to the north. Johann was Ok “this time”. What about next time? It is true, that Johann and I have lived on the margins of the wilds before. I had a lot on my mind riding solo the last 2000 miles home.

    One summer we lived up there for 4 months… hiking the tundra above the arctic circle, paddling 500 miles on the Yukon River, he in his own Kayak at age 11. We took off across unknown tundra above the circle with nothing but our packs, a GPS, maps, Bear Spray and sparse route description from a local native.
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
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    Again at age 15, I took him on a trek in Kluane park. A trek that has no trails, lots of grizzly bears and only GPS points to guide us through the bush. Fear was in the back of my mind the entire 10 days we bush wacked and climbed through glacier encrusted peaks. The fear and the unknown made it fun and challenging. It was more than physically challenging. It was a very mental exercise in all aspects and a real test of fortitude (route finding, map, compass, GPS, knowing the limitations of your party and pushing them to the edge).
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    But when does a father cross the line? I have no answer for this and I wrestled with this the entire ride home. I think back now, when he at age 11, we paddled Prince William Sound, he in his Kayak and me in my own. We hired a water taxi to take us out to a bay and leave us there for 3 days as we paddled the wild sound under our own power. An incredible experience. But in hindsight, was I foolish?


    Yes, I am experienced paddler/hiker/mountaineer, trained and taking all precautions, but there is always danger. I know that anything worthwhile comes at a price. Like when we hiked for 3 days in a pouring rain, lightning striking the ground within mere yards of us as we hurried off the ridge in the tundra down to the valley.. all the time I had to hide my fear to avoid a sense of panic and fear in front of my son. But still, is this the price I was willing to pay?
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    Rain, bears, wolves... nothing can intimidate us.

    [​IMG]
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    The ultimate campsite... Priceless




    My friend in WH told me that these things happen and you can’t live your life in a shell. But, this was my son. I feel I was lucky… This Time. But what about next time? Could I live with myself? I hope that there is no next time.


    I find solace in the fact that he is nearly an adult, and soon all choices on these matters will be his. I can only hope that I made positive influence in his life. Yes, he has done and experienced more than may adults. I suspect that when he is 40, married with kids, he will come to realize what we did together was incredible... maybe even foolish. I don&#8217;t know. Maybe his wife (if he marries) will think I am crazy&#8230; maybe even think he is crazy. I don&#8217;t know the answer. I do know that I wouldn&#8217;t have traded a moment of any of these experiences with my son for anything. And that&#8230; is probably my best answer I am comfortable with. I feel like the luckiest father in the world&#8230; my son holds nothing against me, says it isn&#8217;t my fault, asked me to continue the ride for him and thanked me for taking him along and sharing in the wanderlust. He says we wants to go back and finish the ride. And for that I am grateful. It has a been a fun ride (figuratively speaking) with my son from his day of birth to the present. I wouldn&#8217;t trade any of the experiences we&#8217;ve shared together for anything.<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>

    More Research and searching for answers.
    The evening we came back from the Arctic circle and we were back in Fairbanks, Johann mentioned that he experienced some wobble. We discussed this a bit as he said it occurred over an area with severe frost heaves. Unfortunately, I dismissed this discussion to something minor due to the road conditions. In hindsight, should I have been more diligent? I don't know.

    I did a bit of research on speed wobble and discussed this with my experienced mechanic here in Seattle. There are many factors that contribute to it. Higher suspension bikes are more susceptible. Load the bikes up for a long trip and throw in a few frost heaves.. who knows... I am in the process of seeing if I can get a steering damper installed. Johann seems to have no fear on getting back on the bike, but I am afraid now.

    Next steps, get the bike back from Dawson, where it is currently being stored. That will be a story in itself to be posted here.

    Now that we are both back home, we can give a proper accounting of the entire trip from beginning to end. There are many things we have not shared, many thoughts, insights and people we've met that have yet to be accounted for.

    Stay tuned... The adventure isn't over.:deal
    #86
  7. Yukon Johann

    Yukon Johann Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    35
    it's very strange, because shortly after the wreck I couldn't really remember much of what happened almost as if i had blacked out. as the days came and went, i was remembering more and more...

    overall the crash didn't really scare me in a way that i don't want to ride anymore, it really just reinforced the whole ATGATT idea. I will say that I am ready for another ride when the opportunity presents itself:thumb
    #87
  8. TigerXC

    TigerXC Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 28, 2012
    Oddometer:
    87
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    First, Yukon Johann, you are the poster child for ATGATT. The pictures of your gear reflect the impact that they absorbed. It is much easier to replace any piece of gear than any piece of you. I crashed my first street bike, a 1977 RD400, at the age of 17. The crash changed my attitude toward riding safely but not my passion for riding.

    GrizzLee, in your earlier posts you document your opinion on ATGATT, you put Johann through the MSF course prior to him taking it formally, you meticulously prepared the bikes for this trip. These are not reckless actions but the actions of a loving father who wants to instill your spirt of adventure and the outdoors in your son. I have already commented on my observations when the three of us rode together in May. I immediately saw the coaching and mentoring and can only imagine that it continued throughout your trip North.

    This is not the way that anyone wants to end a trip. But you are now both back home safely. You have many great memories to reflect on. Sometimes in life, it is the setbacks that make us better in the future.

    I still hope that we have the opportunity to all ride together again this fall.

    All the best,
    Tim
    #88
  9. IDRider

    IDRider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    253
    Location:
    Back to God's Country - nurturing my soul!
    GrizzLee, I am a father of three. It is our responsibility to raise our children and prepare them to live their lives. This alone carries risk. While I hope and pray that my children live long and wonderful lives, holding them in a cocoon is not living. Life is full of risk and rewards. We/they will never receive the rewards without some risk.

    You prepared your son and yourself quite well. Accidents do happen,such is life.

    I hope that one day I will be able to experience a similar adventure with at least one of my children.

    Ride safe.
    #89
  10. Bark

    Bark Panic Dancer

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    66
    Location:
    Kenai Peninsula Alaska
    Wow! As has been said you are a perfect demonstration of the importance of wearing gear.
    Sorry for the crash but you have a great story to tell instead of us reading a story about a fatality in Canada.

    GrizzLee: You are doing it right!
    #90
  11. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2010
    Oddometer:
    679
    Location:
    Pacific NorthWest
    I hope you can have adventures with your kids. These trips have been among the most rewarding things I've done in my life. I've no regrets... Just some guilt that maybe I could have done more. You are correct. It's a rewards vs risk equation. Kids have to experience it to understand it. I am glad my son is ok and not soured from the whole ordeal. He has been researching speed wobble a bit and even found a couple of YouTube videos whereby he shows me the bike behaving just like his.




    Tim, many thanks for the kind words.
    I look forward to riding with you and your son this fall. Hopefully I can get Johann's bike put back together by then. He needs new riding gear as well. The ol credit cards are going to take a continuos beating for awhile. :becca:fight

    BTW: There will be no guessing on Birthday and Christmas gifts this year. :lol3
    #91
  12. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    545
    Location:
    Denver
    Grizz,

    I think it's natural to question yourself but don't beat yourself up about Johann's accident. You took the necessary training, bike preparation and gear precautions in case of such an instance. Instead, pat yourself on the back for having him as prepared as he could be should the worse-case scenario occur.
    #92
  13. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2010
    Oddometer:
    679
    Location:
    Pacific NorthWest
    Consider this the start of our Formal Trip Report. Some of this may be redundant, but hang in there. Despite the somber ending to Johann's Ride, it was still magical. Read on and find out more.


    Our Life Behind Bars &#8211; Father & Son Doing Time in The Northern Frontier (Mile 0 to Mile 328)<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Day 1 (June 29, 2013)<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    The trip started joyfully. Wow, another dream comes true.<o:p></o:p>
    I am finally going to get to ride to Alaska. I always wanted to do this. Never thought I would be able to until Johann was through college or at least partially through college.

    (Note - Click on Pictures to see larger version)

    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
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    <o:p>We are ready for launch</o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Clean, loaded and ready for Adventure</o:p>
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    Preamble<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>All the weeks leading up to the trip were hectic. We had to get the gear. Thankfully, we were outfitted pretty good in the lightweight camping gear department and clothing as well. Having been on several expeditions and treks in the north already, we knew what to take and what to leave behind.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    I got my affairs at work in order as best I could. However, late technical problems came my way and I had to make adjustments as best I could. I got the house in order. Roof cleaned, yards re-seeded, all the yard trimming of the trees and bushes were done. I then focused on the bikes. First and foremost, I had to plan for tires. I knew we were going to ride about 6000 miles in total. On average I get about 10K miles on my tires. But that is a mixture of riding, mostly without big loads. I figured that I would get about ½ to ¾ of that mileage on a loaded bike. So I ordered new tires and removed the exiting sets on both bikes. I was in between service intervals on both bikes, but I decided to have them fully checked out by AlyxMoto here in the Seattle area. Alyx is a knowledgeable and thorough BMW specialist and more importantly, trust worthy. He is full of knowledge , experience and helpful suggestions. I trust his judgment and implicitly. Sooooo about $2500 later, I have both bikes tuned up, parts replaced, maintenance items all taken care of, new Touratech farkles installed and a new set of tires on both bikes. I begin packing the gear many weeks before. I was meticulous in selecting what would go and what wouldn&#8217;t. Unfortunately, Johann was still in school on the other side of Puget Sound here in Washington. So I could not get much input from him.<o:p></o:p>
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    The plan was to camp 2 out of every 3 days to catch up on laundry, shower, etc...<o:p></o:p>


    Among other things, our gear included the following: <o:p></o:p>
    • Sleeping bag x 2<o:p></o:p>
    • Sleeping Pad x2<o:p></o:p>
    • Small sleeping pillow (for dad)<o:p></o:p>
    • A 4 season tent (3 man as I figured we would like some elbow room)<o:p></o:p>
    • A Tarp with poles<o:p></o:p>
    • Jet Boil Stove<o:p></o:p>
    • Cooking Pan x 2<o:p></o:p>
    • Lightweight soup bowl/mug x 2<o:p></o:p>
    • Spork x 2 (combination spoon/fork)<o:p></o:p>
    • Camp Ladle<o:p></o:p>
    • Spatula<o:p></o:p>
    • 3 changes of clothes x 2<o:p></o:p>
    • 6 small rags (for cleaning the bikes)<o:p></o:p>
    • 6 small soft towels (for cleaning the windscreens and helmet faceshields)<o:p></o:p>
    • Soap<o:p></o:p>
    • Razors (Dad shaved, Johann did not)<o:p></o:p>
    • Backpackers towel x 2<o:p></o:p>
    • Toothbrush x 2<o:p></o:p>
    • Toothpaste<o:p></o:p>
    • Deodorant x 2<o:p></o:p>
    • Dehydrated food (16 days worth)<o:p></o:p>
    • Laundry Detergent<o:p></o:p>
    • Nintendo DS x 2 (entertainment in the tent)<o:p></o:p>
    • 35 mm SLR Digital Camera<o:p></o:p>
    • GoPro Camera and accessories<o:p></o:p>
    • Miniature Tripod<o:p></o:p>
    • Personal Locator Beacon<o:p></o:p>
    • Bear Spray<o:p></o:p>
    • Comprehensive First Aid Kit<o:p></o:p>
    • Laptop<o:p></o:p>
    • 2 TB USB drive (Backup pictures/video)<o:p></o:p>
    • GPS<o:p></o:p>
    • USB power cords to charge everything<o:p></o:p>
    • Camera battery charger<o:p></o:p>
    • Extra Camera Batteries<o:p></o:p>
    • Extra Micro SD cards<o:p></o:p>
    • Cell Phones x 2<o:p></o:p>
    • iPod<o:p></o:p>
    • Completes set of tools (all maintenance and repairs on the road if needed)<o:p></o:p>
    • Air Compressor<o:p></o:p>
    • Tire Gauge<o:p></o:p>
    • Tubes x 3<o:p></o:p>
    • Chain Lube<o:p></o:p>
    • 409 Cleaner<o:p></o:p>
    • Cleaning brush<o:p></o:p>
    • Bike straps<o:p></o:p>
    • Waterproof bike covers x 2<o:p></o:p>
    • 1 Gallon Rotopax Gas Cans x 4<o:p></o:p>
    • Extra oil<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Johann graduated from the Washington Youth Academy about 2 weeks prior to us leaving and would take the Motorcycle Safety Class to complete his formal training and get his official motorcycle license. Again, family came to visit and many of Johann&#8217;s friends and such all came by to say goodbye for the summer and many forever. Many evenings passed during the last 2 weeks where we didn&#8217;t get anything done towards getting ready for the trip. With work ramping up (instead of down) I was getting pretty stressed. It all worked out somehow.

    The Day Has Arrived<o:p></o:p>
    On Saturday June 29<SUP>th</SUP>, we left. Father and son were on there way to the north. After a coupel of weeks of hard rain, we found ourselves leaving in the middle of a northwest heat wave that was also high in humidity. No worries I thought. The farther north we go, the cooler it would get. This was a bad assumption as later we would find that high heat and humidity followed us all the way beyond the Yukon border. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Bad News at the Border</o:p>
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    All was good&#8230; until we got to the Sumas Border crossing into Canada. The little town decided that they needed host a parade down main street, blocking the border crossing for about an hour. WTF!!! So we sat in line with our HOT M/C gear on sweating. Many people wouldn&#8217;t turn their cars off and the tractor trailers... they never shut down. It was a pretty miserable sitting there waiting to cross the border. The parade ends and we have another 40 minutes or so to cross&#8230; there is a big line of cars/trucks/RVs waiting. It was the type of deal where you really couldn&#8217;t turn your engine off. Having an air cooled bike, this was bad. Both Johann and I could feel the heat of our engines roasting us. By the time we got to the border, we were cooked. We turned off our bikes, removed our sweaty helmets and handed them our passports. All was well and they waved us through. Except Johann&#8217;s bike wouldn&#8217;t start. We had to push it out of the road. I began checking all the fuses. They were good. Next I checked the electrical system. No juice anywhere. Arrrghhhhh!! A few months prior, the battery imploded and I had to replace it. I thought to myself &#8220;not again!!!!&#8221;. I pulled the battery and left Johann to guard all the gear as I went into Abbotsford to locate a new battery. About 2 hours later I return&#8230; without a new battery. I had located 3 stores (one a John Deer Shop and 2 other general Power Motor Sport type shops). They tested the battery and said it was good. Hmmm&#8230; What to do. It was now about 3 PM in the afternoon and M/C shops are closed the next 2 days. I decided that we&#8217;d put the battery back in, button the bike up and get a ride back home or camp nearby until Tuesday. What a bummer of start I thought this was going to be. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Moving again... Yipppeeee!!!!</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    I put the Dakar back together and what do you know. The ignition lights lit up!!! Huh!! Will it start? I turn the key and YES, YES, YESSSSS!!!! :clap:clap:clap:clap

    I don&#8217;t know what happened. I figured a chip or something overheated and had now cooled off. I thought about it for 15 minutes, trying to decide if we should go or have the bike checked out. To heck with it I said. Let&#8217;s go. We&#8217;ll deal with it later.
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Fraser River Canyon</o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>The Road</o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Break TIme</o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>A storm was brewing... Oh no!?!</o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>More Break Time</o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Lilloet In the Evening Sun</o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
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    From there we rode over to Mission B.C. over to Maple Ridge past Harrison Lake to Hope. We then truned north on Highway 97 towards Lytton. Once at Lytton, we took a side road over to Lilloet. This is a great M/C road. However, by now it was about 8:00 and a thunderstorm was brewing. We headed over toward Clinton B.C. hoping to arrive at Downing Provincial Park via a shortcut known as the Pavilion road. The road is all gravel and has 12-18% grades on either end. It would be Johann&#8217;s first test on his bike in the dirt. How would he do?
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>We brought Riding Companions with us..</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Near Fountain Valley.. A scenic Train and tunnel</o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Looking back... See the train tunnel?</o:p>
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    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>The begging of the dirt and then into camp for the night.</o:p>
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    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>The Pavilion Road (see the rain squall chasing us)</o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
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    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Looking east toward the Marble Range Mtns</o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>

    I am pleased to say that he did fantastic in the dirt. :freaky
    We arrived at Downing Park only to find it closed. We headed towed the Day Use area and despite the crowds there already setup and camping, we got a nice spot by the lake. Free Camping!!! As we were setting up camp (it was nearly 10:00 pm by now), a friendly Canadian gent offered us a beer. Johann declined, but I jumped at it. :1drink
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>One last look before we plunge into the dark forested valley below to our camp.</o:p>
    <o:p>Beautiful eh?</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>

    Awe what a day I thought. I hope tomorrow is less stressful.:kumbaya<o:p></o:p>
    #93
  14. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2010
    Oddometer:
    679
    Location:
    Pacific NorthWest
    Thanks Sean...
    I am very grateful for the safety aspects and the ATTGATT. Johann thanked me for gearing him up properly and even telling him how to handle himself if the bike goes down. In fact, the first thing he said to me (after I swallowed hard to digest what I was witnessing at the crash scene) was that he was grateful that I told him not to put his foot down at high speed to keep the bike up. He may have broke his leg, or even worse got thrown from the bike. All the while, I am looking at his feet poking through his boots.. he still had his helmet on and the bike was in pieces in the ditch. I welled up for a good hour or so as we headed back to Dawson to the nurses station.

    He wants to ride again.. without hesitation he says so. We are going to get him some off-road training in the future. I also told him that when a bike wobbles that one need to press your knees into the tank and lean forward to dampen the oscillatory motion. He is diligently researching bike wobble. I am working with my mechanic to install a steering damper (if it is possible) when I get the bike home and repaired. I am still afraid of that bike now.

    Trying to move on and show the brighter side of the trip. We didn't get a chance to post very often, so please read on and we'll fill in the gaps. It was a fantastic experience. We personally met a 1st nations Chief, saw wildlife, Glaciers, and many, many interesting people. We even got invited to a native salmon bake.

    If my computer stays alive, I should be posting some videos as well. I have a lot of great footage and even video of a near miss accident on my ride home.... darn cager not paying attention :eek1
    #94
  15. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2010
    Oddometer:
    679
    Location:
    Pacific NorthWest
    Our Life Behind Bars &#8211; Father & Son Doing Time in The Northern Frontier (Mile 328 to Mile 919)<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Days 2-3 (June 30 - July 1, 2013)<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    The next couple of days we got no reprieve from the heat and humidity. The heat wasn&#8217;t so bad, but the high humidity made for uncomfortable riding.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    We left Downing Provincial park intending to camp at Purden Lake, another park just outside of Prince George on the Yellow Head Highway. Along the way we learned that the park was full due to the Canadian holiday weekend. So we planned to camp in McBride instead (about 1 ½ hrs south). Which we did.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Along the way we took a road near 70 Mile House off of Hwy 97 towards Green Lake and up to Hwy 24. Green Lake and the other lakes in the area were superb. I had never been on these roads. We did take quite a bit of video. However, at one of our stops, I must have forgot to put my camera bag away and I lost the bulk of my GoPro gear. All I had was just the camera, as it was mounted to my helmet. All my cables, cards, extra batteries and the LCD screen were lost.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Johann at Green Lake</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    [​IMG]
    It's going to be a bright sun shiny day

    We ended up on the Little Fort Hwy and passed by a bunch of small lakes including Sheridan and Bridge Lake, all of which made for a nice casual morning ride.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    Once at Little Fort, we headed north on the southern portion of the Yellow Head Highway through Clearwater. We stop for lunch and gas in Clearwater. The high noon sun was prominent in the sky by now and we were both suffering from the heat and humidity. It was in the mid 90&#8217;s by now. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Avoiding Heat Exhaustion </o:p>
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    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>This was typical of our stops</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    We stopped at Blue River totally exhausted from the heat. We found a nice sign with an overhang, advertising for Helicopter Skiing. It has cool grass and shade. We hydrated and took a nap there. After a snack we proceeded up through Valemount and arrived at McBride. We stopped several times to admire the waterfalls and the high mountain views. All-in-all a pretty day for riding.
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Looking good on the Yellow Head Hwy </o:p>
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    <o:p>Need some of that snow down here :D:D</o:p>
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    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Our Camp at McBride.. they had showers and Horseshoes!!!</o:p>
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    <o:p></o:p>

    The next day was looking nice and we packed and headed out before the heat set in. About 2 hours into the ride, we were suffering from heat. Aside from the heat, the ride was enjoyable and scenic. At one point we saw a wolf run across the road like a greyhound at full speed. A couple of stops for rest and water&#8230;. we finally made it to Prince George. Just outside of Prince George is an interesting road named Boeing Road. Interesting to me that is, as that is the name of my employer back in Seattle. We stop and get a soda and a burger before heading on. Oh, and we did find a Future Shop to replace some of the bits of my lost GoPro. We were now back in the video business.

    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Strange graffiti at a rest stop... Anti-Logging?!?!</o:p>

    [​IMG]
    Boeing Road

    [​IMG]
    Riding on the Boeing Road

    We made the decision to ride up north via the Cassiar Hwy instead of the Alaskan Hwy. This meant that we had a long, somewhat boring ride between Prince George and Smithers. I say boring, because the road is all 2 lane hwy and is rather featureless without much to see. We passed through very small towns like Vanderhoof, Fraser Lake, Topley, etc&#8230; It was still miserably hot and humid. We had to stop many times to ease the fatigue. Eventually we had dinner in Burns Lake. The weather to the west began to show signs of rain. We were actually excited to have it cool off. The winds came up and it began to drizzle. At one point we spotted a black bear along the road eating garbage that someone had thrown from their car... which was disturbing to us.
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Another typical rest stop</o:p>
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    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Darn heat made riding so exhausting </o:p>

    We rode into a town called Houston (they claim the have the worlds largest Fly Rod which is on display in the town center park) when the sky opened up and it began to rain hard. We decided that it was time to get a room for the night. So our first non-tent night began 3 days into the trip. Just as planned. :clap<o:p></o:p>
    #95
  16. gbmaz

    gbmaz Power Newb

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Oddometer:
    491
    Location:
    Los Alamos, NM
    GrizzLee-

    As others have said everything has risk and you did everything you could to make sure your son was geared up right. No parenting fail there. Letting your kid sit at home playing XBox all summer - that is a parenting fail!

    On a personal note I have observed that the vast majority of really cool, well balanced people I meet who also have a good relationship with their parents as adults have one thing in common - time spent outdoors with their family as kids. Whether it is serious adventures like the ones you and your son have taken in AK or just family road trip to National Parks that is the one common factor. It is that quality time spent together in an environment that demands self reliance combined with working together that does it.

    Every one of the amazing trips you have taken with your son are an act of love. Down the road it is the shared experience of those trips that will define your relationship. That is some quality fathering.

    Keep up the good work and keep writing ride reports about all your adventures together.
    #96
  17. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2010
    Oddometer:
    679
    Location:
    Pacific NorthWest
    Hey, good words. I never thought about the outdoor aspect of well balanced people. Acts of love... Absolutely!!

    We are moving on and telling our story up to and even beyond the accident. There is some good value in it for both of us. I made that decsion and I hope you folks enjoy traveling with us. It is what is. And Johann agrees. He wants to get his bike back ASAP and get back to riding. I value his enthusiasm and opinion in these matters.

    Thanks buddy!!!
    #97
  18. Lupin 3rd

    Lupin 3rd Raygun Gothic

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    816
    Location:
    MoCo, MD
    Hey Grizz don't beat yourself up, accidents happen. At least you were around to help your son, few are so fortunate!
    #98
  19. Yukon Johann

    Yukon Johann Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    35
    Our Life Behind Bars – Father & Son Doing Time in The Northern Frontier (Mile 919 to Mile 1376)<?xml:namespace prefix = "o" ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Days 4-5 (July 2- 3, 2013)<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    The day after in Houston was marvelous… Until the heat and humidity arrived… AGAIN!!<o:p></o:p>
    We had a nice breakfast in Smithers with a couple on a Can-Am trike whom wet met a couple of days before.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Downtown Smithers</o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Parking for Breakfast</o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Leaving Smithers</o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>We went to New Hazleton and Moricetown to see if the natives were dip netting for Salmon yet. We arrived at Hwy 37, the Cassiar hwy. We took a few pictures and met a few more riders heading north. We also met a nice RCMP who highly recommended a good Mexican Restaurant in Terrace. He gave us directions. Since we were heading that way, it sounded good. <o:p></o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Buckley River</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
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    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Buckley River Canyon</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    We arrive in Terrace a little bit early for dinner. So we gassed up the bikes and took off for the Nisga’a Lava beds. The park is about 60 miles north of Terrace and one heck of a beautiful ride through some glacier peaked mountains and inland fjords. Absolutely wonderful.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>The bikes getting a Rest</o:p>
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    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>WOW!!!!!</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Stopped to admire many lakes, and waterfalls along the way. We ended up staying in the Nisga’a park campground.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    The Tseax Cone situated in a valley above and east of the Tseax River was the source for an eruption during the 18th century that killed approximately 2,000 Nisga’a people from poisonous volcanic gases.

    The real spelling/pronunciation is Anhuluut’ukwsim Laxmihl Angwinga’Asanskwhl Nisga’a (a.k.a. Nisga’a Memorial Lava Bed Park).

    [​IMG]
    Lichen Growing on the Lava Rock

    <o:p></o:p>
    It is an amazing place to visit which features lava damned ponds and lakes, tree molds, cinder cones, lava tubes and abundant wildlife.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>looking west from the park</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Some views of the lava beds</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Views from camp</o:p>
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    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Camp</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Nisga'a Visitor's Center - A Long House with some cool artifacts and history.</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    We traveled to the end of the Nass river valley, following the amazing Nass river where it emptied into the inside passage (Ocean). It was a very scenic ride and the road ended in Gingolx a Nisga'a Village. Form the terminus of the road we could see Alaska and the entrance to the Portland Canal. The community itself has four clans which are Killer Whale, Eagle, Raven and Wolf. Apparently, the name Gingolx comes from the Nisga'a language words meaning "place of the skulls." Apparently they were attacked by another nation, the people of Gingolx held their own. They hung their enemies' skulls on sticks, lining them up along the river as a warning. We didn’t dare even think about spitting or littering in this village.

    [​IMG]
    A tree mould

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    More Lava and lichen

    [​IMG]
    Me and another tree mould

    [​IMG]
    Hey, I fit...

    [​IMG]
    Heading West

    [​IMG]
    Cool suspension bridge at Caynon City

    [​IMG]

    <o:p></o:p>
    After lunch, we rode to New Aiyansh (traditionally known as “Gitlakdamix”). It is the capital of the Nisga’a nation.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    After a good burger, we headed for Stewart and Hyder, Alaska. We took the Nisga’a Hwy over to the Cassiar hwy. It was about 34 miles of dirt road that was pretty dusty, but fun.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Just before we arrived at Meziadin Lake we saw our second , third and fourth bears of the trip. All black bears and cute as heck.

    [​IMG]

    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    We had to stop and get our complementary pictures at the Bear Glacier on the way to Stewart. Along the way we encountered a black bear along the road that was caught between the river and a rocky cliff. The bear had no escape except to waddle down the road for a bit until it could egress the hwy safely. We had a great time herding this bear and even have GoPro video of the event.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Hey, hey, hey</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>
    <o:p>Nice road to Stewart</o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    We arrived in Stewart with a threat of rain and checked into the King Edward Hotel for the night with hopes of heading up to the Salmon Glacier the next day.

    [​IMG]

    Thanks for riding with me and my dad....

    Oh and don't forget to contribute to my fundraiser.
    Yukon Johann's Ride to Alaska
    #99
  20. looksha

    looksha n00b

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2013
    Oddometer:
    9
    Just glad that Johann and Lee made it home in one piece!