Oz / Kiwi Suzuki DR650 Adv Riders Sign in Here please

Discussion in 'Australia' started by davorallyfan, Feb 20, 2007.

  1. Weldr

    Weldr Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2013
    Oddometer:
    134
    Location:
    SEQ,Australia
    Need to true up the rear wheel, where should the centre of the rim be positioned
  2. Born-to-ride

    Born-to-ride GSXR!!!

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    113
    Location:
    Australia
    Taking the DR to King Lake forest, VIC, for some mud play on Sunday. PM me if anyone interested to join


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  3. kezzajohnson

    kezzajohnson kezza

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,442
    Location:
    Cairns - Queensland Australia

    When I built my motard wheels, i took these measurements first to then work out the new offset for wider rims on stock hubs

    My stock rear hub and rim measurements are as follows:

    Lay a straight edge across the sprocket side of hub (with cush drive removed) and the measurement from straight edge to the outer edge of the rim should be 28.5 mm approx

    On the other side (disc brake side without disc) = 18.5 approx - with disc on add about 1.5mm (disc sits over a lip on the hub)

    Another measurement taken was with rear wheel installed the right side swingarm inside edge to the rim bead seat edge of rim (inner circumference of bead edge of rim) = 48mm

    If this doesn't make sense, please ask.
  4. Wetndry

    Wetndry Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    17
    Location:
    Australia
    Is the wheel buckled or are you replacing the hub or what?
  5. Weldr

    Weldr Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2013
    Oddometer:
    134
    Location:
    SEQ,Australia
    Thanks, that is good information
    I wouldn't say it's buckled, bought it recently, someone has tightened the spokes unevenly
  6. Wetndry

    Wetndry Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    17
    Location:
    Australia
    Do you have access to a couple Dial indicators? And a means of rotating the wheel off the bike IE vee blocks with the axel fitted? That being said what sort of riding do you mainly do road or off road? If mainly road you'll want it as true as possible. Nothing worse than out of round or crap balancing.:freaky
  7. kezzajohnson

    kezzajohnson kezza

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,442
    Location:
    Cairns - Queensland Australia
    You can do it on the bike if you have to with a pointer fixed to the swingarm for horizontal alignment. Its not so easy to check the vertical alignment with a tyre on the rim cause tyres aren't always that round themselves. If possible remove the tyre and use a fixed pointer on the ground to measure the rims vertical alignment. Not as accurate as a truing machine and dial indicators but dial indicators can be a headfuck too cause they measure very minor fluctuations that are hard to correct and that won't make any real difference anyway.

    Because I was building a set of motard wheels from scratch, I purchased a wheel truing machine and one dial guage (just shifted the dial guage to measure vertical and horizontal), because I wanted them perfect. Not so critical for the trail wheels but they are very handy to have around for doing balances after tyre changes.

    There's several pretty good 'how toos' on the net.

    Here's one.

    http://www.webbikeworld.com/motorcycle-wheels/spoke-wheels/
  8. Chill

    Chill Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2012
    Oddometer:
    359
    Location:
    QLD Australia
    When I've done bicycle wheels in the past I found it helped between truing checks to remove the wheel, place it on something to support the hub and apply weight to the rim on opposing sides of the wheel, turn the wheel, repeat, turn repeat etc. The spokes try to twist as they are tightened and often bind against each other. You'll hear things "pinging" as you go round the wheel and then when you go for another round of truing you'll have a more reliable starting point.

    Hope that made sense. It's probably not as applicable for motorcycle wheels as the spokes are a lot thicker and have less tendency to bind.
  9. slapper

    slapper Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    Oddometer:
    140
    Location:
    Adelaide
    well .. not completely as it turns out.

    Bike is still runnning but this morning's commute to work was accompanied by the "no power thing".

    It seems not to be speed related, but more decel related. If I'm sitting on 90 kph and I roll off - even just a little - the bike bogs for a few seconds when I roll on the accelerator. I'm pretty sure it did it at lower speeds too but I'm not super confident about that claim. It's not constant either - sometimes it will do it (the 90 kph on the highway seemed to be pretty "reliable", but 90 kph a little further down the track seemed to be happy), sometimes not.

    Thanks to my trusty new inline fuel filter, I could see that it still had fuel in it, so at least I can factor out the fuel tap.

    Looks like I get to pull the carb and at least give it a once over after all! :cry

    cheers
  10. JAKE91

    JAKE91 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    29
    Location:
    Queanbeyan NSW
    Sticky or worn slide perhaps? Possibly you back off the throttle which reduces the air flow and then the slide takes a short while to catch up. While the slides stuck up it's still allowing excess fuel through to the engine. The time it takes for the slide to catch up and the excess accumulated fuel to be burned off may be the flat spot that your feeling.
    Or perhaps something simpler that takes less words to explain?

    Edit: On second thoughts it just sounds like a rich needle. Could be a worn needle jet, unless it's been played with, then it could be the wrong needle, or the wrong clip position.




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  11. duckslider

    duckslider unintentionaldrifter

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,942
    Location:
    down from The Mount...Australia.
    fitted a 606 on rear today.Took off michelinT63,just about cactus after only 3500km.too much tar,not enough dirt!
  12. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Oddometer:
    5,181
    Location:
    Snowy Mountains Oz
    Presumably a Thai made T63? They seem to last a lot less than the Czecho made ones, at least for me.
  13. duckslider

    duckslider unintentionaldrifter

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,942
    Location:
    down from The Mount...Australia.
    Dunno where it was made....but dissapointed in wear.See what happens with 606,they are popular.Have used mitas e07 and got 8450kms out of it.
  14. kezzajohnson

    kezzajohnson kezza

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,442
    Location:
    Cairns - Queensland Australia
    How can one tell the difference between a Thai and Czecho made T63?

    I can't seem to find anything on the tyre that tells me. The last one I bought and had fitted by the local dealer and didn't think to check.
  15. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Oddometer:
    5,181
    Location:
    Snowy Mountains Oz
    Its moulded onto the sidewall along with all the other stuff 'Made in XXXXX'.

    The rubber has a different sheen to it too, Thai ones are shinier. Czecho ones last the same as a Mitas E09 with the same 'sheen to them', so presumably the same formula. Thai ones, about 60-70% life. This is with a couple of each to date on my DR, so I didn't just read it on the 'net. Still a limited sample though. I actually have a Thai T63 on right now, so more testing to come, as soon as its alive again. Real soon now in fact.

    'Mi' in Mitas is Michelin, who are major shareholders.

    They may also be made elsewhere. Michelin has factories all over, including Spain and France that I've had their tyres from before.
  16. duckslider

    duckslider unintentionaldrifter

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,942
    Location:
    down from The Mount...Australia.
    had a look,yep Thai made.
  17. Portly

    Portly Plodder

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Oddometer:
    378
    Location:
    North coast NSW Aus
    I recently bought another set of E07s and noticed they have changed the design of the centre rib to put more meat where the old ones used to crack. I am heading west next weekend for a 5 to 6000 km trip so will soon know if the wear is still good.
    I tried Heidenau K60s last and the rear was illegal at 7000 km.
  18. french horn

    french horn Just Add venture

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    475
    Location:
    Bundaberg Qld. Australia

    I guess this is current info:

    in this link, see #7 (on pic and list below it)


    http://www.dunlop.eu/dunlop_euen/what_sets_dunlop_apart/tyre_info/index.jsp?id=61418

    in this link, see top of page ... codes in numeric/alpha order so click appropriate square using code as found on tyre as-in #7 from prior link

    http://www.harriger.com/tires.htm


    confused? ... LOL

    hope this helps
  19. 0405canvet

    0405canvet Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2012
    Oddometer:
    641
    Location:
    brisbanish
    Hey Portly. Have you richened your jetting?? Pretty cold out there!
  20. Portly

    Portly Plodder

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Oddometer:
    378
    Location:
    North coast NSW Aus
    G,day Gordon, The bike is still running well I was up on the mountains at 5 degrees a couple of weeks back and all was fine. I had been slightly rich in the warmer months averaging 20, on the run into the mountains I averaged about 22 to 23 unloaded.
    You are right about it being cold, This has been the coldest winter in a few years around here.