Parents: did you all continue to ride immediately after your child was born?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Grad, Nov 27, 2012.

  1. Jacl-Kampuchea

    Jacl-Kampuchea Booze Merchant

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    In fact, I brought my in labour wife to the clinic to give birth on the back of one of my bikes - her demand, not mine:1drink.

    Yup, I only have owned bikes these last three years. It's going to be while before I own another car.

    I have one for roads, two for off-road and a scoot that's in three dozen pieces waiting for me to get a day off work. I do approximately 1000km per month, but more on months where I get out for more than a morning or the commute to work.
    #81
  2. JustLoping

    JustLoping n00b

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    I feel your pain.

    I haven't posted on ADV for a couple of years - not since I sold my last bike. My daughter turns three tomorrow, and I sold my last bike (I say last because five years ago I had four of them in the garage) two years ago in February. I had all the same reasons you and others have listed - my wife refuses to get on anymore, no time to ride, and oh yeah...I might not come home from a ride. :eek1

    I'm a MSF Course-trained rider, I used to practice on a regular basis, and I'm ATGATT even in the dead of summer. I've always had a motorcycle endorsement on my license; I turn 52 next week (yeah...do the math, I had a daughter a week before I turned 49). It took my wife and I 18 years, so needless to say parenthood is a big deal to us - a gift we'd given up on. So the bike is gone, has been for a couple of years, and I miss riding every day. FWIW, this was my decision. My wife was not supportive of selling to start since she knows how much I love to ride, but she understood the thought process.

    So my daughter's no longer a baby, and I have some time here and there to swing a leg over, but now I'm bikeless. My wife is mostly okay with me getting a new one...but we'll see how that goes if I fall off the wagon. I struggle with the big picture - what if I don't come home from a ride? Financially they'd be fine; frankly I'm worth more dead. But I'd hate to have someone else raise my kid, and I wonder if my passion is worth the risk. On the other hand, I don't want to lose who I am in the act of being a father. I'll most likely get another bike - maybe in the spring. Or in a year.

    I thought I'd move on...crap.:waysad

    I feel your pain.
    #82
  3. DefyInertia

    DefyInertia Saratogian

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    Life should be lived to the fullest. I try to lead by example. I have a 17 month old daughter and a almost born daughter.
    #83
  4. hugemoth

    hugemoth Long timer

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    We're all aware that street riding is dangerous but how about trail riding? There's a lot of fun to be had on a small bike on dirt roads and trails, and it's about as safe as walking. Fix up an old Trail 90 and make a rack to haul it to the trails on the family car.
    #84
  5. Dauntless

    Dauntless Been here awhile

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    I kept riding after my kids were born. They are 4 and 9 now. I have a two million dollar life insurance policy which is probably why my wife encourages me to ride more often. :eek1
    #85
  6. dirtyron

    dirtyron never grew up

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    continued to ride after child one and two and three and four and the grand children and the great grand children. not riding is not an option, never even considered it.
    #86
  7. dirtyron

    dirtyron never grew up

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    and fuck the stats man .
    #87
  8. NortwestRider

    NortwestRider TRIPOD ADVENTURER !!

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    Me and my wife were racing a local hare scramble back in 87,wife kept feeling sick snd at one of the checks she puked.Got home and she felt bad,went to the doctor the next day and found out she was pregnant.25 years and another kid later we are still both riding,me year around(15,000 miles a year ) she rides in good weather and both are riding to Dead Horse next June..


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    #88
  9. Mike in Atlanta

    Mike in Atlanta Oh Noes

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    Hi Grad,

    Doubt you remember me from Bob's tech day 4 or 5 years ago, heck it might have been even longer now.

    Anyway, same boat, we now have a 5 month old at home. Once I knew my wife was pregnant, I just could not bring myself to go take a ride and not "think" about what might happen. It changed riding for me completely, as it is always in the back of my mind. It was completely unexpected and took me by surprise, one day I realized that it had been 10 months since the GS had left the shop and over a year since I rode north of 53. I have been in the process of getting the GS ready to go on the chopping block, so to speak. Of course part of me thinks "keep riding, keep living etc" but on the other hand the numbers don't lie about the increased risk with riding. I plan on selling the bike, spending a few quality years with the boy and once he is old enough to start riding dirt bikes then I will gradually get back into dual sports/dirt bikes. I grew up riding with my Father and recently learned the only time in his life he did not have a motorcycle was from the time I was born to my 5th bd when he brought home a pair of RMs for the both of us. :clap
    #89
  10. Nadgett

    Nadgett Been here awhile

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    Or you could put the GS in storage and give it to him on his 18th birthday.
    #90
  11. RidingDonkeys

    RidingDonkeys Purveyor of Awesome

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    Best idea ever!

    Sent from the voices in my head and transcribed by their drinking buddy...
    #91
  12. RidingDonkeys

    RidingDonkeys Purveyor of Awesome

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    Reviving an old thread here. We Donkeys welcomed a new member to the family on December 3rd. This is how we got to the hospital.

    [​IMG]

    So yeah, we're still riding. :evil
    #92
  13. Balootraveler

    Balootraveler Been here awhile

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    Did not ride until my girls could drive themselves now I ride almost everywhere I go:)
    #93
  14. wjfawb0

    wjfawb0 Been here awhile

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    I had my first kid and then went out a month later and bought a WR250R. A few months later I bought another FZ1. I rode them for a couple years. When my kid started going to daycare and I had to pick her up everyday, the bikes never saw the road. I sold them due to lack of use. I will probably get another dual sport one day, but for now I'll stick to jeep's, buggies and cages. There's not enough time to do it all, but I'll have fun doing what I can.
    #94
  15. ObiJohn

    ObiJohn Screaming Banshee

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    It's all about assessing and mitigating the risk. There's only one guarantee in life: no one gets out of it alive.

    I don't ride at night, in bad weather, or when there's a chance of black ice (below 40 degrees, or early in the morning after a frost) on a street bike. I don't ride tired. I don't drink... not even one drink. I don't ride quickly enough where riding becomes a test of courage. I don't take stupid chances. (I waited until I was over 50 to ride a street bike; the way I drove when I was younger I'd have been dead by now. Getting older has a way of calming you down.)

    Looking at the stats, the average motorcyclist has approximately a 1:1430 chance of being killed in any year (4800+/- fatalities yearly among a 6.6M motorcyclist population). However, the stats are skewed heavily towards people who ride at night, have their ability degraded by drugs or alcohol, who don't wear sufficient protection, e.g., helmet, armored clothing, and/or drive recklessly. If you are not in that subset and instead are a prudent, responsible rider, you've probably decreased your risk by an order of magnitude (assuming the high risk pool is about 10% of the overall population).

    In short, you can never guarantee your safety. That's why people buy life insurance. What you can do is to put the odds in your favor by making behavioral changes. Whether you choose to continue to ride or not is up to you... but if you do, minimize your risk to maximize your odds.
    #95
  16. GoUglyEarly

    GoUglyEarly Boots Still Clean

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    Never understood the false dichotomy of riding before versus riding after having a family.

    Statistically, giving up the motorcycle while attempting to lower your overall risk profile for death is like going to an all you can eat pasta buffet and removing one strand of spaghetti and calling it a diet. You are more likely to die in your car, fall to your death or be poisoned than die from a motorcycle crash.

    You are 100 times more likely to die from heart disease.

    You are about as likely to catch on fire and die.

    Giving up the motorcycle in order to be a 'good parent' is not rational. It is based on fear assessment, not risk assessment.....or based on image consciousness.

    Of course, pretty much every other human endeavor is judged similarly so don't feel bad if you already sold your bike. You aren't dumb, just not rational.....like pretty much everyone else!
    #96
  17. Voluhzia

    Voluhzia iExplorer

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  18. Montague

    Montague UDF Adventurer

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    Geez, I took up motorcycles because of my kids..............

    Best way to blow off steam, especially since beating the little buggers is so politically incorrect nowadays.:evil

    And in our Golden Years (we hope) a bike and sidecar will be our RV.

    If you have to make an economic choice for your kids, that is understandable.

    But don't do it for risk management. Too many ways to die, not enough ways to live.
    #98
  19. r60man

    r60man Been here awhile

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    If you are ever scared of riding, stop riding, it will bite you and kill you.

    That said naturally riding time does decrease when you have little ones. I had two children, one 11 and the other 5. They are great and I love them, and now that they are older I can get away a little more. When I commuted on the bike it was great because I rode everyday no matter what, but my current position does not allow me to do that easily. But I still get in rides. My oldest has no desire to ride pillion, she tried it and didn't like it. The youngest can not reach the pegs yet, but maybe by the end of this school year. I have a feeling she will love it.
    #99
  20. 131unlimited

    131unlimited Been here awhile

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    I have always rode and have never taken a break. I will stop riding when I die. I take my kids for rides now that they are old enough. Wife will still hops on the back, but once the kids came, she definitly cut down on the miles per year. When we were dating we rode all the time.

    I've always made sure I had life insurance, disability insurance, a will, a living will and full medical coverage for myself and my family. I invest heavily for the kids future and our retirement.

    I've done what I feel I needed to do to be a responsible husband and father so that I can ride guilt free and enjoy how ever much time I get to rip around on this big blue orb.