Piaggio/Aprilia/Vespa 200cc question please?

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by MODNROD, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. max57

    max57 Adventurer

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    Following this thread with interest.
    :ear
    #21
  2. bravada

    bravada Adventurer

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    Keep us posted this sounds like fun. I making popcorn right now........

    What diameter wheels come on the bike? Will you upgrade the tires also? Gravel and super sticky street tires don't sound like a good mix.

    I have a lx 150 and don't know if I would consider a 100 klick commute every day. When I do tour I like to stretch my legs every 35 k or so. My gas mileage averages between 60-63 mpg. Good Luck!!!!

    Looking to here of your adventure with the mods as I would like to do the something along the same to mine.

    Good Luck!!!!
    #22
  3. MODNROD

    MODNROD Decisions, decisions

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    The Sportcity One has 14" wheels, 120/70-14 tyres.The normal bigger liquid-cooled SCs have 15" wheels.
    Standard fitment is Cheng Shin, I'm sure they are an honourable company with good products, but my front tyre unfortunately isn't one of them, after 1000km it is so out of round it damn near shakes the tyre off the deck above 80kph........
    I thought if I had to change the tyres anyway, I've always been partial to Michelin Pilots, but all I can find locally is a Bridgestone for the tidy sum of $130 before fitting, so I might have to look around a bit. A carved block of wood would be an improvement at the moment........

    As for the gravel, scoots are rear weight biased which helps a lot, and very low CofG which helps again, so it's a bit like dealing with a junkie, no sudden movements and just keep cruising along and you should be fine! :lol3

    If you have the LX150, check out the link mentioned above, it will have more info than you could poke a stick at. I've been asked a dozen times why I bought a little 125 for an hour long commute on bumpy highways then modify it for more top end cruising speed, but basically it boils down to the ease in which I can make it what I want. It's almost impossible to buy a 1/2way decent 200cc-250cc aircooled scoot off the floor, which still handles like a scoot (not like a maxiscoot). A SC 250 or SC 300 Cube would probably do the job much better, but I'm loving the whole no radiator to worry about, and the 120kg wet weight already! I'm happy to potter along at 90-100kph all day anyway, so this little thing suits me fine.
    #23
  4. vortexau

    vortexau Outside the Pod-bay

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    [​IMG][​IMG]
    Meanwhile, over in Indonesia . . .
    Honda Beat Off-Road modification


    [​IMG][​IMG]
    Yamaha Fino . . . modded! Yamaha in India markets their 114cc Fino. Just two of various non-standard Finos.


    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Here in Oz, it is the humble ex-postie bike which comes in for (sometimes) radical makeovers.
    #24
  5. MODNROD

    MODNROD Decisions, decisions

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    Hey mate.
    You know if I had been able to buy a little 125cc Honda/Yamaha scoot, like the ones they have in SE Asia everywhere, that would probably have been high on my list. Honda Innova, I think they call them? I did consider the postie bike and also the Sym Symba, then a Lifan 150+ swap, but I'm glad I picked a "proper" scoot, I'm diggin it!

    They race those things in a version of Rallycross in Indonesia and Thailand, looks like bloody good fun too. :D
    #25
  6. redhandmoto

    redhandmoto Been here awhile

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    you know what's cool about this whole deal? your devotion and preference for maximizing small bikes, the little ones; those whose scale and size may mean that one's feet-as-outriggers can be as much an integral component as tires (or tyres, as you prefer), and the hightened influence of body weight-shifting as an input.

    I explain myself badly, as always...let me see...will anyone get my drift if I say that I found the Vespa GTS 250ie to be...too big, too heavy? I sold it off after a year or so with not a look backwards. it manuvered well, was certainly powerful and responsive enough, but somehow the mass and bulk of the thing seemed of a very great and dense specific gravity, like lead, or ukranian blackbread.

    the Yamaha Zuma 125, especially upgeared...now that was a scooter whose corpus amplified its power-plant; not real tiny but compact, amazingly whippable, unbeateable in city traffic. Astounding with a BBK...but I diverge, and veer close to a threadjack...
    #26
  7. bravada

    bravada Adventurer

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    I'm happy to potter along at 90-100kph all day anyway, so this little thing suits me fine.[/QUOTE]

    You hit it on the head. The size of these machines while not perfect are very flexible. Now targeting a 110-115kph cruise.
    One could do almost anything.

    In the States this target cruise speed would be perfect when needing to put on the miles yet still having all the advantages in the city.
    #27
  8. MODNROD

    MODNROD Decisions, decisions

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    Yeah, that's pretty much the deal for me too. These little toys respond to inputs almost telepathically, no steering into a bend, moving your head a bit is enough weight change to start it dropping in! :lol3 If I could keep that responsiveness and gain a 100kph cruise speed at 3/4 throttle, then aaaaahhhh! I got the bug big time after riding my daughters little 50cc, loved them ever since.

    The big bikes are fun, but very different. My Vmax takes off the line pretty quick, still easily the equal of most new bikes for the first 100m, but the highways are a an exercise in deliberate movements, subject to variation mid-corner for bumps and slight wallows, or occasionally when running over a small hairy elephant......not much other than it's own frame will move the thing off line. I need a whole lane to maintain a straight line on the highway at 120kph, and when I whack the throttle I always ensure the other lane is free too! It is a source of great angst to me that I have never done 200MPH on a bike before, only 198. These little scoots are a reminder that bikes are fun, they don't have to be stoooopid fast or set a record.

    Anyway, I'm just loving this little thing. Sitting on 90kph at the moment really doesn't concern me at all. The Vmax flexes and wobbles it's way to 100MPH in just under 7secs, the dragbike does it nearly a second faster than that (after I've plucked my eyeballs out of my bum after the launch), but neither of them are as much fun as going round that series of 60kph-marked bends on the little scoot while having the throttle pinned.........:clap
    #28
  9. MODNROD

    MODNROD Decisions, decisions

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    Well, I've just arrived at work after riding the 100km through the dark for the first time, leaving home at 0130am. I now have a few pertinent observations.......

    When the sun goes down, it gets to 10*C. When you haven't ridden at night or in the cold for a while, extremities go numb......then you start shivering, even at only 90kph.......then at my age you start to ache! :lol3

    The bike now has nearly 1500km on it (over 600km last week! :clap), and the motor is freeing up nicely. No headwind combined with the proper run-in now has me sitting on 90kph true speed (105kph steady on the speedo) all the way here, and since my trip is almost exactly 100km, I can measure the fuel consumption pretty easily and repeatably. I filled up on arrival here tonight, and it took 4.2L/100km. This is with 2/3 - 3/4 throttle all the way.

    The low beam light (left one) has a really good wide spread pattern. The high beam light (right one) has sufficient depth, but no width. Both run 35W Halogen globes. I tried running both on together by using the "passing" button (?!?!?!?!?! :lol3), and the light beam was excellent, so now I'm going to try to save lighting power by fitting LEDs where possible, so I can have enough spare alternator output to wire up both lights together for high beam.

    I'm also thinking of putting in HID, at least on high beam. That will make it easier to see the roos that insist on jumping in front of me (the brakes work really well.........).

    When you run over a small 6" tall rabbit, the bike jumps into the air, and you heart jumps into your mouth!

    Now, excuse me while I turn that heater on.........
    #29
  10. redhandmoto

    redhandmoto Been here awhile

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    suicidal bunnies, hypothermia, ninja roos...for more than 60 miles...in the dark...not your average commute.
    #30
  11. MODNROD

    MODNROD Decisions, decisions

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    Not your average commute indeed, but one I enjoy.

    I have a new helmet on order, my current one is a really light kevlar-composite blah blah race full-face thing, very stable at high speed, but also unfortunately with a low-over-the-eyes vision port. This means that while riding along at night using the force (coz the headlights aren't quite there yet!) I need to use even more of the force to take my eyes off the road while zinging along at 90kph so I can stare at the bright Milky Way........

    The new open face helmet also means I can drink out of my coffee thermos riding along while staring at the stars.
    It's all good.
    #31
  12. MODNROD

    MODNROD Decisions, decisions

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    I'm bored.
    I'm also tired, it's 9:15pm and I've been up since 2:30am.
    But I also rode the little-engine-that-could home today, and gave it a little bit of hard time, so for any future owners I have some more info........

    I left work early afternoon, and the temp was 37*C, and 100km later when I got home the temp was 38.5*C. I also chased a few trucks, trying to get a slipstream. Well I tried to anyway, they're still about 5kph faster than me generally, oh well. Once off the gravel and corrugations (try to avoid them by the way.......), I wound it in to 3/4-7/8 throttle in the heat to see how it would cope. If it blew up I figured some upgrades would be in order. Unfortunately, it just kept zinging along happily, so I guess the upgrades will have to wait for a bit.
    Dammit! :rofl
    Anyway, the speed averaged 86kph into a 15kph headwind for the whole highway rolling hills trip home, even with the higher air temps hovering around the 100F mark for those on the other side of the world. It also averaged 4.4L for the 100km trip. I did the old-fashioned "glove-to-the-fins" trick (well, as best as I could) when I arrived home, and it was cooler than my old Kwaka Zed used to get on a really hot day, so it coped fine basically. Oil smelled fine too, not too hot.

    So there you go, don't be afraid to ride these little Leader's in Summer.
    Tough little buggers! :lol3

    When I get the Puig windscreen here, and also the Dr Pulley sliders and Kevlar belt I have on order, I was thinking of doing a before-and-after quicky performance test. Nothing flash, I was thinking just 0-50kph (0-30mph), 0-80kph (0-50mph), and the end speed after a set distance, like 800m (1/2 mile) or something. Top speed I'm not interested in, and would be too hard anyway, too reliant on wind speeds and inclines. I remember when I was Googling high and low for any sort of real info it was pretty thin. I certainly didn't buy the thing based on a 1/4 mile test, but sometimes it's nice to see whether changing parts actually does anything at all. Most of the info could probably be applied as a % basis to other 125s I guess. It will probably be a couple of weeks away, but if anyone's interested I'll stick it in here I guess, no need for a new thread.

    Ride safe.
    #32
  13. redhandmoto

    redhandmoto Been here awhile

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    So you got an average 86kph using 3/4 to 7/8 throttle into a 15kph headwind, with the engine settled nicely into optimum operating temp while riding in an ambient 100* F. Niiiice....

    Love the esprit of adventuresome yet objective & scientific inquiry, too: "Right, then...we're riding in this broiling effin' desert, keeping a smart rate for a goodly stretch where some o' yer brand-name air-cooled mills would carmelize in the heat n' well, if she blows, we''ll see the smoke 'n trow 'er cross the shoulders fer home & bang out some nice parts orders on the interWebs. Aye."

    Aussies; fair dinkum right down the line. :1drink
    #33
  14. MODNROD

    MODNROD Decisions, decisions

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    Yep.

    I'm impressed. Not bad really, my lawnmower has a bigger engine I think!

    Oooh, where's my tape measure?
    #34
  15. MODNROD

    MODNROD Decisions, decisions

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    I've just hotrodded the scoot!
    I spose it was only a matter of time, I possibly, maybe, MIGHT have a bit of prior history........

    I managed to add 7kph indicated to the top speed (averaged 3 runs, up and back, before and after, down a flat road with no wind), and it cost me all of $135 inc freight. Talk about bang for your buck.

    Yep, I fitted a screen! :rofl I liked the look of the Puig City Touring, the mounts looked easy to use and/or modify to taste, and it fits well, quality product.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This a shot from the riders perspective, I've set it up so it has a slight rearwards angle that looks pleasing, and the height is level with my nose (6ft1, 34" inseam).
    [​IMG]

    And if you are 1.12m tall, or 3ft8, like my just turned 4 yr old boy, it would protect you during a cyclone I rekn! :lol3
    [​IMG]

    Very quiet at a 90kph cruise, wind goes just over my helmet. In case your size is different to mine, I still have 2" downwards, 2" upwards, and 2" forward/back range of adjustment.
    Now.
    Where's my coffee to sip while riding?
    :clap
    #35
  16. redhandmoto

    redhandmoto Been here awhile

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    nice shape to that screen, in profile; more a sculpted fairing & not just a flat board.
    #36
  17. MODNROD

    MODNROD Decisions, decisions

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    Yep, the screen works well.
    My reasoning is when I rode the little thing to work a couple of days ago, I managed to average 74kph for the trip. Huh?

    We had a storm brewing, and I had to ride into the teeth of a 40-50kph headwind. I almost had to hold it flat for the trip, and got here with only a few minutes to spare before going on watch. I already get up at 0100 to get ready and ride, getting up at 0030 is just too hard. Then I had to ride home in between watches to repair some storm damage at home, so up at 0230 to go on watch, get off watch at 1500, ride home through blustery 40kph sidewinds, fix the light damage (mainly to stop the dog going walkabout! It took out the fence), have a quick bowl of "Salami soup" (mmmmm! Vege soup with split peas and finely sliced thin salami stick), then ride back to work into the blustery headwind again. I got back at 1900 just in time to go to bed and do it all again. The total travelling time compared to something that will sit on 110kph was an extra 35 minutes. I've done the trip variously in an old crappy dinosaur Ford ute (1hr5mins), Supra TT (an hour easy or less), Vmax (42mins!!! HAHA!), but 1hr20mins is too long.

    So now it's crossroads time. I rekn it will sit on 90kph normally, but winds kick it around big time. I really need something that will easily do 100kph without too much strain, and 110+ when really needed (like yesterday), just in case of emergencies at home, and to ensure punctuality at work.

    I can get double the power pretty easily out of this little aircooled motor, with a combination of parts from Germany and Italy, and a healthy dose of good-old-fashioned race knowhow and tools in the shed, and it will do what I want I think, parts cost should be around $700. The other option is to trade the little feel-good scoot on a Sportcity 250/300 or a big fat-bummed maxiscoot (gotta love girls with big bums! :lol3), which sounds way too much like common sense to me! The resale value of the bike isn't important, once it does what I want I'll keep it, but they're not worth a lot anyway.

    Decisions, decisions.......
    :ear
    #37
  18. redhandmoto

    redhandmoto Been here awhile

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    Mmmmmm. Should think it'd be emotionally hard to leave off the littl'un before sort of getting to the bottom of its potential with some add-on bits. Still, when the distances are great, and with the chance that emegencies may arise any time at the far end, it is tempting to have the built-in assurance of performance...a tough call.
    #38
  19. MODNROD

    MODNROD Decisions, decisions

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    Yeah Bill, it's tough for the reasons you said.
    I'm not too worried about not reaching the little one's potential, over the years now I've done it a few times with different rides and racers, so having confidence in the achievable end result means I feel less inclined to prove it all again, if you sorta see what I mean? :huh
    I have to admit at the moment I'm 50/50. A SC250 has a 10L tank, which helps, and the radiator air inlet is nowhere near the front wheel, so no chance of rock damage on the highway either.
    I rekn I'll contemplate my navel for a while, and ring around, there may be a really good deal out there, maybe not. I'm still leaning towards keeping it, coz it's nearly new, but I am pondering the ease of switching to a slightly faster ride.
    #39
  20. redhandmoto

    redhandmoto Been here awhile

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    ah. Letting em go. Couldn't do it for the longest time. The reg fees and insurance were killing me when we had six - four crammed in the shed, one locked down outside, and the amped Tomos feller in the basement, carried up stairs for outings. Each got its perf. mods done, too; pipes and intakes, upjets, final drives, variators. Spiderweb of tender cables in the shed and the circuit breaker going. In the end, it was the trouble keeping all those bikes ridden, just the two of us, batteries charged, fuel systems purged of water and the expense to keep them all current.
    Oh to be Leno. with Leno's staff.
    Oops, threadjack, sorry.
    #40