plug reading help.

Discussion in '2 smokers' started by stainlesscycle, Jun 28, 2012.

  1. AC Swank

    AC Swank Banned

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    Any way to add weight, like the stick on wheel weights or gluing some on?
    #21
  2. stainlesscycle

    stainlesscycle Long timer

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    [​IMG]

    i'm sure i could fab a flywheel weight up for it. i'd wanna add almost 16-20 oz. though..
    #22
  3. AC Swank

    AC Swank Banned

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    The face of that flywheel looks like a good place to add weight.

    You could make an impression in some clay and form a mold to pour some melted lead and attach with double backed tape.
    #23
  4. stainlesscycle

    stainlesscycle Long timer

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    dunno if i'd trust double backed tape at 10k rpm....
    #24
  5. AC Swank

    AC Swank Banned

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    #25
  6. stainlesscycle

    stainlesscycle Long timer

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    yes, i have several of their weights.



    as for the glued in magnets,they are internal to the rotor, so centrifugal force is not working against them like the external flywheel weight...

    either way, i'm slowly replacing bits of this stock ignition to see if that's the issue. spark has always appeared fine
    #26
  7. AC Swank

    AC Swank Banned

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    I wish I was closer, I'd love to see what you are doing first hand.
    #27
  8. V-rider

    V-rider Been here awhile

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    ...but I thought I would just comment since I work for the company (NGK) that makes the plugs you are using.

    Those deposits are not a heat range problem. Looks like too much oil. Are you sure you didn't have a bad crank seal on the wet (tranny oil) side?

    The heat rating only affects the temperature of the center electrode ceramic - not the side electrode. There are heavy oil carbon deposits all over the firing end of that plug. It's not a spark plug or heat range problem.

    I see that you mentioned that the spark seems fine. It's hard to tell without actually measuring the voltage required to jump the gap. If by chance you had a really weak spark then it could affect the combustion - but it's kind of rare to have enough spark to light the mixture but not do it well enough that it would create those heavy deposits (Hopefully that sentence makes sense).

    I would guess that you will still have those heavy deposits even if your ignition system was in tip-top shape. The spark itself will not clean off that kind of crud. The spark intensity and the heat range are completely separate things and do not affect each other at all. (Auto manufacturers have tried and found that there is no measurable correlation.) A "hotter" spark does not heat the end of the spark plug. In conventional ignition systems, a "hotter" spark only occurs when you increase the voltage required to jump the gap. For example, widening the gap will bring the voltage level up because it takes more voltage to jump the gap. But the temperature of the center electrode ceramic will not change.

    That being said, there are ways to help prevent fouling by running the spark over the edge of the ceramic, as on a semi-surface discharge spark plug. But that will not really help your problem.

    If you ever see this post I would like to find out what you did to fix it.
    #28
  9. Twin-shocker

    Twin-shocker Long timer

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    The first plug looks like transmission oil being sucked into the motor, through drive side crank seal or possibly damaged crankcase gasket.

    All CDI based ignitions suffer from reduced spark intensity over the years. This is due to the capacitor degrading, which results in less power going to the HT coil when the system is triggered.

    On almost all AC systems with an external CDI unit, its possible to replace them with a cheap pit-bike part costing less than $20.

    Finally its very difficult to get accurate plug colour readings when modern fuels are being used in 2T motors, but using a specific race oil such as Castrol XR77 developed to help give accurate readings, will make plug readings much less a matter of pinning the tail on the donkey as it were.
    #29
  10. stainlesscycle

    stainlesscycle Long timer

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    it was an ignition issue.
    #30
  11. PSchrauber

    PSchrauber Been here awhile

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    Have seen likewise -but not so much- carbon build up after using "over stored" gasoline in combination with too much oil, (as some amount of the gas had evaporated)

    After exchanging the fuel mixture, the effect was over.

    I'am now also using a colder Plug in my bike when just putting around, for faster riding with modultated terrain and long inbetween tracks I use the standard plug. Works pretty good so far.

    To determine the engine health by plug color has got difficult, this is slightly too lean:

    [​IMG]

    That is OK:

    [​IMG]
    #31